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Encyclopedia > John Loosemore

John Loosemore (August, 1616 - April 18, 1681) was an English builder of pipe organs. He is best known for his organ at Exeter Cathedral in Devon, which he completed in 1665. == {| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1613 1614 1615 - 1616 - 1617 1618 1619 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1580s 1590s 1600s - 1610s - 1620s 1630s 1640s |- tall> 16th century - 17th century - 18th century |} randomised 1616 was a leap year starting on Friday... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article or section should be merged with Organ (music) The Casavant pipe organ at Notre-Dame de Montréal Basilica, Montreal. ... The west front. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


John Loosemore was born in Barnstaple where he was baptized on August 25, 1616. His father was also a builder and repairer of organs, and passed on the trade to his son John, who moved to Exeter sometime before 1645. The other two sons of the family, Henry and George, also had a connection with organ music as they were eventually appointed organists at King's College, Cambridge and Trinity College, Cambridge, respectively, probably under the patronage of Dudley North, 4th Baron North. Statistics Population: 34,000 (April 2006 Est. ... August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (238th in leap years), with 128 days remaining. ... == {| align=right cellpadding=3 id=toc style=margin-left: 15px; |- | align=center colspan=2 | Years: 1613 1614 1615 - 1616 - 1617 1618 1619 |- | align=center colspan=2 | Decades: 1580s 1590s 1600s - 1610s - 1620s 1630s 1640s |- tall> 16th century - 17th century - 18th century |} randomised 1616 was a leap year starting on Friday... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this articles infobox may require cleanup. ... // Events January 10 - Archbishop Laud executed on Tower Hill, London. ... Full name The King’s College of Our Lady and St Nicholas in Cambridge Motto Veritas Et Utilitas Truth and usefulness Named after Henry VI Previous names - Established 1441 Sister College(s) New College Provost Prof. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Dudley North, 4th Baron North (1602-1677), increased the family fortune by marrying the daughter of Sir Charles Montagu, brother of the 1st earl of Manchester. ...


During the rule of the Puritans in Exeter from 1646-1660, church music was frowned upon. Many church organs, including the previous instrument in Exeter Cathedral, were vandalized or destroyed during the English Civil War. During this period, Loosemore was employed primarily in repairing organs and building other keyboard instruments for private ownership. One of his virginals dated 1655 has been preserved in the Victoria and Albert Museum. The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... 1646 (MDCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... The English Civil War consisted of a series of armed conflicts and political machinations that took place between Parliamentarians (known as Roundheads) and Royalists (known as Cavaliers) between 1642 and 1651. ... A harpsichord is the general term for a family of European keyboard instruments, including the large instrument nowadays called a harpsichord, but also the smaller virginals, the muselar virginals and the spinet. ... Events March 25 - Saturns largest moon, Titan, is discovered by Christian Huygens. ... The Victoria and Albert Museum viewed from Thurloe Square. ...


With the restoration of Charles II to the throne in 1660, Loosemore was commissioned first to repair the old organ in Exeter Cathedral, and then, in 1662-1663, to build a new one. This was completed on May 27, 1665. Loosemore reported the cost of the new organ as £847.7s.10d. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... // Events January 1 - Colonel George Monck with his regiment crosses from Scotland to England at the village of Coldstream and begins advance towards London in support of English Restoration. ... Events February 1 - The Chinese pirate Koxinga seizes the island of Taiwan after a nine-month siege. ... // Events Prix de Rome scholarship established for students of the arts. ... May 27 is the 147th day (148th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 218 days remaining. ... 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Loosemore constructed at least two other organs during his lifetime, another in Exeter Cathedral for the choir school and one at Nettlecombe Court for Sir George Trevelyan.


After the marriage of his eldest daughter Joan to his assistant John Shearme in 1674 or 1675, Loosemore turned over much of his business to him and lived in semi-retirement. After a period of increasing infirmity, he died on April 18, 1681, and was buried in Exeter Cathedral. His gravestone was originally placed in the floor at the east end of the nave near the entrance to the south aisle of the choir, close to his organ, but has since been moved to the north choir aisle near the north wall. Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ... Events January 5 - The Battle of Turckeim June 18 - Battle of Fehrbellin August 10 - King Charles II of England places the foundation stone of the Royal Greenwich Observatory in London - construction begins November 11 - Guru Gobind Singh becomes the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs. ... April 18 is the 108th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (109th in leap years). ... Events March 4 - Charles II of England grants a land charter to William Penn for the area that will later become Pennsylvania. ...


He is the namesake of the John Loosemore Centre for Organ and Early Music in Buckfastleigh, Devon, originally founded in 1974 as a teaching establishment offering tuition in both organ playing and history, and construction of organs in an adjoining workshop. The teaching program has since been discontinued, but the organ-building workshop remains under the direction of William Drake. Buckfastleigh is a small town in Devon, England, partly within Dartmoor National Park, and on the A38. ... For other uses, see Devon (disambiguation). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


External links

  • Exeter Cathedral organ
  • Loosemore genealogy site
  • More Loosemore genealogy information
  • William Drake, organ builder

  Results from FactBites:
 
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John 1808, the third son, married Charlotte Partridge in Thelbridge parish on 30 April 1862, where their family of five daughters and two sons were born.  Neither of their two sons, William Henry and Sidney John, survived to marry so this branch became extinct.
John W 1842 moved to London where he married Ellen Jane Edwards in Camberwell on 1868.  Their family and descendants settled mainly in south-west London, where they are still to be found.
John 1811, baptized 19 May 1811, the seventh child and youngest son of Richard 1768, married Jane Hancock on 18 October 1836 in George Nympton, her home parish, as was reported in a local newspaper.  Ten children were born to them by 1851.
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