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Encyclopedia > John Loewen

John Loewen (pronounced Lay-ven) (born December 21, 1949) is a businessman and politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1999 to 2005 as a member of the Progressive Conservative Party, and campaigned for the Canadian House of Commons in 2006 as a Liberal. December 21 is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Motto: Gloriosus et Liber (Latin: Glorious and free) Official languages English (some French services are provided, but French does not have official status at the provincial level) Capital Winnipeg Largest city Winnipeg Lieutenant-Governor John Harvard Premier Gary Doer (NDP) Parliamentary representation  - House seat  - Senate seats 14 6 Area Total... The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The House of Commons (French: Chambre des communes) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor General) and the Senate. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ...

Contents


Early life and career

Loewen was born in Elkhorn, Manitoba, and raised in Winnipeg. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Manitoba in 1973, and joined the payroll services company Comcheq Services Ltd. (now called Ceridan) in the same year. He served as company president from 1984 until 1998.
Elkhorn is a village in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. ... Motto: Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Area: 465. ... A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ... The University of Manitoba (established in 1877) is one of four universities in Winnipeg, Manitoba and was the first university ever established in Western Canada. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


In 1993, Loewen oversaw Comcheq's transformation into a subsidiary of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC).[1] Despite concerns that the Winnipeg company's autonomy would be undermined by the national bank, the CIBC initially allowed it to remain fairly independent.[2] Loewen attempted to reacquire the company in 1998, but was unsuccessful.[3]
1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce TSX: CM NYSE: BCM, better known to most customers as CIBC, is one of Canadas major banks. ...


Loewen has for many years been a prominent figure in supporting Manitoba's sports community. He developed a plan in the early 1990s to financially support the province's Olympic atheletes and, along with future mayor Sam Katz, helped establish the Winnipeg Thunder basketball team in 1992.[4] He has also provided financial assistance to several athletic programs. In 1994, a newspaper columnist in Winnipeg described Comcheq as "probably the most generous private-sector supporter of elite athletes in the province".[5]
For months before the Olympic Games, runners relay the Olympic Flame from Olympia to the opening ceremony. ... List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba: 1874 Francis Evans Cornish, Q. C. 1875–76 William Nassau Kennedy 1877–78 Thomas Scott 1879–80 Alexander Logan 1881 Elias George Conklin 1882 Alexander Logan 1883 Alexander McMicken 1884 Alexander Logan 1885 Charles Edward Hamilton 1886 Henry Shaver Wesbrook 1887–88 Lyman Melvin... Samuel (Sam) Michael Katz, OM , BA (born Rehovot, Israel, 1951) is the 42nd mayor of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. ... The Winnipeg Thunder was a professional basketball franchise based in Winnipeg, Manitoba from 1992 to 1994. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


He helped create the Manitoba Entertainment Complex Group (MEC) in 1994 in an effort to purchase controlling shares in the Winnipeg Jets hockey franchise, and keep the team in the city.[6] Loewen chaired the MEC and participated in plans to build a new arena for the team. Despite his efforts, the Jets were forced to leave the city in 1995. Loewen has argued that the National Hockey League and commissioner Gary Bettman undermined his efforts, by presenting unreasonable demands shortly before an official deadline.[7]
1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... The Winnipeg Jets was an ice hockey franchise that existed in both the World Hockey Association and the National Hockey League. ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The modernized NHL shield logo debuted in 2005, replacing the orange and black shield, which had been used since the leagues inception. ... Gary Bruce Bettman (born on June 2, 1952 in Queens, New York) has served as commissioner of the National Hockey League since February 1, 1993. ...


He has been a board member and chairman of Economic Development Winnipeg, a council member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Manitoba, a board member and president of the Big Brothers and Sisters Association of Winnipeg and president of both the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra and the Linden Woods Community Association. He has also been involved with the United Way of Winnipeg, serving on the United Way Cabinet from 1994 until 1999 as Chair of the Major Corporate Division and Deputy Chair of Business. He is a founding Director of the Business Council of Manitoba.
The United Way of America is a coalition of charitable organizations that has traditionally pooled efforts in fund raising. ...


There were rumours that Loewen would run for Mayor of Winnipeg in 1998, but he declined.[8] List of mayors of Winnipeg, Manitoba: 1874 Francis Evans Cornish, Q. C. 1875–76 William Nassau Kennedy 1877–78 Thomas Scott 1879–80 Alexander Logan 1881 Elias George Conklin 1882 Alexander Logan 1883 Alexander McMicken 1884 Alexander Logan 1885 Charles Edward Hamilton 1886 Henry Shaver Wesbrook 1887–88 Lyman Melvin... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ...


Provincial politics

Loewen entered political life in Manitoba's 1999 provincial election, winning election for the newly-created south Winnipeg constituency of Fort Whyte. Running as a Progressive Conservative, he defeated New Democrat Bidhu Jha by 3,665 votes. The New Democratic Party won the election, and Loewen became a Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) in the Official Opposition. He was appointed as his party's critic for Intergovernmental Affairs,[9], and was later promoted to Finance Critic. Loewen was considered a rising star in his party, and there was some speculation that he would run to succeed Gary Filmon as party leader in 2000.[10] He decided against this when the party establishment united behind Stuart Murray.
The election of September 21, 1999 in Manitoba, Canada returned to power the New Democratic Party (NDP), which had been out of power since 1988. ... Fort Whyte is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... Bidhu Jha is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... A Member of the Legislative Assembly, or MLA, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to the Legislature or legislative assembly of a subnational jurisdiction. ... The Parliamentary Opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. ... The Honourable Gary Albert Filmon, PC, P.Eng. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... Stuart Murray (born November 24, 1954) is a Manitoba politician. ...


He was a moderate in the Progressive Conservative Party, and supported the centre-right Progressive Conservative Party of Canada rather than the right-wing Canadian Alliance at the federal level although many of his colleagues backed the Alliance. In 2001, he was the only member of the provincial PC caucus to attend a Winnipeg fundraiser for federal PC leader Joe Clark.[11] Also in 2001, Loewen criticized the provincial New Democratic government of Gary Doer for not going far enough in extending rights to same-sex couples. He specifically criticized the government for not providing adoption rights as part of its legislative package, even though the Progressive Conservative Party as a whole did not support adoption rights.[12]
The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada (PC) was a Canadian centre-right conservative political party that existed from 1867 to 2003. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Joe Clark (born Charles Joseph Clark on June 5, 1939 in High River, Alberta) was the sixteenth prime minister of Canada from June 4, 1979, to March 3, 1980. ... Gary Doer (March 31, 1948-) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ...


Loewen became involved a serious controversy in early 2002, after issuing a media notice that was strongly critical of Manitoba's Crocus investment portfolio. He wrote that the company held investments "in a number of Manitoba companies" that were "in financial difficulty", and requested that the government halt sales of the fund. His statement was not approved in advance by the Progressive Conservatives and was met with strong opposition from the fund, which threatened legal action.[13] Loewen was demoted from his position as Finance Critic,[14] and made a formal apology to the legislature in April 2002.[15] Almost three years later, Crocus stopped trading and was forced into receivership. Many believe Loewen's concerns were vindicated by the trust's eventual failure.[16]
For the Cusco album, see 2002 (album). ... The Crocus Investment Fund is a labour-driven investment fund in Manitoba, Canada. ...


He was re-elected in the 2003 election by a slightly reduced margin. In late 2003, he introduced a bill to phase out Video Lottery Terminals from the province.[17] The June 3, 2003 provincial election in Manitoba, Canada was won by the New Democratic Party, which won 35 seats out of 57. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Video Lottery Terminal or VLT is a gambling machine that allows gamblers to bet on the outcome of a video game. ...


Federal politics

The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada merged with the Canadian Alliance in early 2004 to create the Conservative Party of Canada. Loewen initially supported the new party, but announced on September 23, 2005 that he would seek the federal Liberal nomination for Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia in the upcoming federal election. In making the announcement, Loewen said he was uncomfortable with the social conservatism of Conservative leader Stephen Harper. He was quoted as saying that he "never believed in the policies of the former Alliance and Reform parties", which he described as "dominat[ing] the [Conservative] party". [18] He resigned from the provincial legislature on September 26, 2005, and subsequently defeated Gennarino Conte for the Liberal nomination.[19]
The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... Charleswood—St. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... Stephen Harper (born April 30, 1959) is the 22nd Prime Minister of Canada and leader of the Conservative Party of Canada. ... The Canadian Alliance (in full, the Canadian Reform Conservative Alliance) was a Canadian right-of-centre conservative political party that existed from 2000 to 2003. ... The Reform Party of Canada was a Canadian federal political party founded in 1987. ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 96 days remaining. ...


Loewen lost to Conservative incumbent Steven Fletcher in the 2006 federal election, as the Conservatives gained twenty-five seats to form a minority government. Loewen acknowledged that the national trend worked against his candidacy.[20] Steven John Fletcher, MP, B. Sc. ... The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... A minority government or a minority cabinet is a cabinet of a parliamentary system formed by the leading political party when it has won a plurality but not a majority of seats in the parliament. ...


Table of offices held

Preceded by:
constituency created in 1999
Member of the Manitoba Legislature for Fort Whyte
19992005
Succeeded by:
Hugh McFadyen

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge ridings. ... Fort Whyte is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hugh McFadyen (born 1967) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ...

External links

  • Official website

Electoral record

2006 federal election: Charleswood—St. James—Assiniboia
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Conservative (x)Steven Fletcher 20,791 46.98
     Liberal John Loewen 16,099 36.37
     New Democratic Party Dennis Kshyk 5,669 12.81
     Green Mike Johannson 1,700 3.84
Total valid votes 44,259 100.00
Total rejected ballots 157
Turnout 44,416 69.93
Electors on lists 63,517
2003 provincial election: Fort Whyte
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Progressive Conservative John Loewen 4,960 52.71 $13,693.53
     New Democratic Party Janine Ballingall Scotten 2,647 28.13 $18,368.88
     Liberal Gerry Sankar 1,803 19.16 $14,257.51
Total valid votes 9,410 100.00
Rejected and declined votes 24
Turnout 9,434 56.61
Registered voters 16,664
1999 provincial election: Fort Whyte
Party Candidate Votes % Expenditures
     Progressive Conservative John Loewen 6,480 61.73 $25,444.88
     New Democratic Party Bidhu Jha 2,815 26.82 $24,511.00
     Liberal Malli Aulakh 1,202 11.45 $18,808.08
Total valid votes 10,497 100.00
Rejected and declined votes 66
Turnout 10,563 76.33
Registered voters 13,838

All electoral information is taken from Elections Canada and Elections Manitoba. Provincial expenditures refer only to candidate expenses. The 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the Canadian House of Commons. ... Charleswood—St. ... The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a right-of-centre political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Steven John Fletcher, MP, B. Sc. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party positioned around the centre of the political spectrum, combining a generally progressive social policy with moderate economics. ... The New Democratic Party (NDP) is a political party in Canada with a social democratic philosophy and moderate democratic socialist tendencies that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... The New Democratic Party won fielded a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 federal election, and won 29 seats to become the fourth-largest party in parliament. ... The Green Party of Canada is a federal political party in Canada. ... The Green Party of Canada is intending to run a full slate of 308 candidates in the 2006 Canadian federal election. ... The June 3, 2003 provincial election in Manitoba, Canada was won by the New Democratic Party, which won 35 seats out of 57. ... Fort Whyte is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba fielded a full slate of candidates in the 2003 provincial election, and won a majority government with 35 of 57 seats in the Manitoba legislature. ... The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Manitoba Liberal Party won two seats out of 57 in the 2003 provincial election, making the party the third-largest in the legislature. ... The election of September 21, 1999 in Manitoba, Canada returned to power the New Democratic Party (NDP), which had been out of power since 1988. ... Fort Whyte is a provincial electoral division in the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a right-of-centre political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The New Democratic Party of Manitoba is a social democratic political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... Bidhu Jha is a politician in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. ... The Manitoba Liberal Party elected one member to the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba in the 1999 provincial election. ... Elections Canada is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Canada responsible for the conduct of federal elections and referendums. ... Elections Manitoba is the non-partisan agency of the Government of Manitoba, responsible for the conduct of provincial elections. ...


Notes and sources

  1.   "CIBC becomes leading supplier of payroll services", Canada NewsWire, 25 January 1993.
  2.   Martin Cash, "Comcheq flourishes on a long leash", Winnipeg Free Press, 11 March 1994.
  3.   "Leadership hope gone up in smoke", Winnipeg Free Press, 15 February 2002, A4.
  4.   Ashley Prest, "Katz loses some of his thunder", Winnipeg Free Press, 25 March 1994.
  5.   David Roberts, "Consortium wants to buy Jets", Globe and Mail, 27 August 1994, A14.
  6.   Kelly Taylor, "Share the glory", Winnipeg Free Press, 23 April 1994,
  7.   John Douglas, "'Demands outrageous', Loewen says", Winnipeg Free Press, 28 April 1995, City Page. Bettman denied this, claiming that advance notice had been given and that his conditions were necessary for creating a stable franchise. See Mary Ormsby, "Winnipeg group not serious, Bettman says", Winnipeg Free Press, 3 May 1995, C3.
  8.   Kim Guttormson, "Thompson decides she won't seek third term in mayor's office", Winnipeg Free Press, 25 April 1998, A1.
  9.   "Tory eyes on NDP", Winnipeg Free Press, 23 October 1999, A5.
  10.   "Possible contenders", Winnipeg Free Press, 5 November 1999, A2.
  11.   Helen Fallding, "Joe Clark - the $1,000 man Conservatives feast on Alliance follies", Winnipeg Free Press, 18 May 2001, A1.
  12.   Helen Fallding, "Limited gay rights bill passes second reading", Winnipeg Free Press, 28 June 2001, A3.
  13.   Helen Fallding, "Tory comes out blazing, shoots himself in foot", Winnipeg Free Press, 14 February 2002, A1.
  14.   Helen Fallding, "Murray flip-flops, demotes Loewen", Winnipeg Free Press, 16 February 2002, A1.
  15.   Murray McNeill, "Loewen dodges the bullet", Winnipeg Free Press, 8 May 2002, B3. Loewen's apology prevented a defamation suit from Crocus.
  16.   "Murray had chance to be a hero over Crocus", Winnipeg Free Press, 1 June 2005, A15.
  17.   Mia Rabson, "Phase out most VLTs, Tory urges", Winnipeg Free Press, 28 November 2003, A3.
  18.   Michelle MacAfee, "Federal Tory MP prepares to fight Liberal opponent plucked from his own ranks", Canadian Press, 23 September 2005, 16:40 report.
  19.   Carol Sanders, "Candidates can't be assured of votes from ethnic groups", Winnipeg Free Press, 22 January 2006.
  20.   Leah Janzen, "Alcock loss jolts Liberals, but Keeper keeps it even", Winnipeg Free Press, 24 January 2006, B3.

Some biographical information is taken from Loewen's website.


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Loewen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1364 words)
John Loewen (pronounced Lay-ven) (born December 21, 1949) is a businessman and politician in Manitoba, Canada.
Loewen was born in Elkhorn, Manitoba, and raised in Winnipeg.
Loewen was considered a rising star in his party, and there was some speculation that he would run to succeed Gary Filmon as party leader in 2000.
John Loewen - definition of John Loewen in Encyclopedia (241 words)
John Loewen (born December 21, 1949) is a politician in Manitoba, Canada.
Loewen was born in Elkhorn, Manitoba, and received a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Manitoba in 1973.
Loewen was re-elected in the 2003 election, by a slightly reduced margin.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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