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Encyclopedia > John Letcher
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John Letcher (1813-1884) of Lexington, Virginia, was an American lawyer, journalist, politician, served as Representative in U.S. Congress (1851-1859), Governor of Virginia (1860-1864), Delegate in Virginia General Assembly 1875-1877, and on the Board of Visitors of Virginia Military Institute 1866-1880.

John Letcher (March 29, 1813-January 26, 1884) was a lawyer, journalist, and politician. He served as a Representative in the United States Congress, was Governor of Virginia during the American Civil War, and later served in the Virginia General Assembly. He was also active on the Board of Visitors of Virginia Military Institute. Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the state of Virginia. ... For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The Virginia Military Institute {VMI} is the first state-supported military college and is located in Lexington, Virginia, USA. It has been referred to as the West Point of the South. Early history On November 11, 1839, the Virginia Military Institute was founded on the site of the Lexington state... March 29 is the 88th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (89th in Leap years). ... 1813 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... For information on the type of fish called Lawyer, see the article on Burbot. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism. ... A politician is an individual involved in politics. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The Virginia Military Institute {VMI} is the first state-supported military college and is located in Lexington, Virginia, USA. It has been referred to as the West Point of the South. Early history On November 11, 1839, the Virginia Military Institute was founded on the site of the Lexington state...

Contents

Childhood, education

John Letcher was born in the town of Lexington in Rockbridge County, Virginia. He attended private rural schools and Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia. In 1833, he was graduated from Washington Academy in Lexington. He studied law was admitted to the Virginia State Bar and opened a practice in Lexington in 1839. Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the state of Virginia. ... Rockbridge County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... Randolph-Macon College is a private, co-educational liberal arts college located in Ashland, Virginia, near Richmond. ... Ashland is a town located in Hanover County, Virginia. ... Events January 3, Britain seizes control of the Falkland Islands in the South Atlantic. ... Washington and Lee University (originally Washington College) is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


Lawyer, journalist, Congressman

Letcher was editor of the (Shenandoah) Valley Star newspaper from 1840 to 1850. He was active in the presidential campaigns of 1840, 1844, and 1848, serving as Democratic elector in 1848. Although never a true abolitionist, he signed the Ruffner Pamphlet of 1847, which proposed the abolition of slavery in that part of Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountains; however, he soon repudiated this antislavery stand. He was a delegate to the State Constitutional Convention in 1850. 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Slavery is any of a number of related conditions involving control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or other clear forms of coercion. ... Blue Ridge Mountains (NPS) Most of the rocks that form the Blue Ridge Mountains, United States, are ancient granitic and metamorphosed volcanic formations, some exceeding one billion years in age. ... Events January 4 - The first American ice-skating club is formed (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania). ...


He was elected as a Democratic candidate and served as a Representative in the United States Congress from 1851-1859. In Congress, he was known as "Honest John" because of his opposition to government extravagance. The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...


American Civil War

John Letcher was elected as Governor of Virginia in 1859, and served from 1860-1864. Letcher was prominent in the organization of the peace convention that met in Washington, D.C., February 8, 1861, in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending American Civil War. He discouraged secession, but was active in sustaining the ordinance passed by Virginia on April 17, 1861. In 1864, his home in Lexington was burned by Union troops during General David Hunter's raid. Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the Northern states during the American Civil War. ... Categories: Stub | 1803 births | 1888 deaths ...


Postwar: General Assembly, VMI

After the Civil War, Letcher resumed the practice of law in Lexington. He was elected as a member of the House of Delegates in the Virginia General Assembly 1875-1877. He was a member of the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Military Institute (VMI) 1866-1880 and served as president of the Board for ten years. The Virginia General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Virginia. ... The Virginia Military Institute {VMI} is the first state-supported military college and is located in Lexington, Virginia, USA. It has been referred to as the West Point of the South. Early history On November 11, 1839, the Virginia Military Institute was founded on the site of the Lexington state...


He died on January 26, 1884 at the age of 70, and was interred in the Presbyterian Cemetery (Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery) at Lexington, Virginia.


Sources

Books

Boney, F.N. (1966) John Letcher of Virginia; The Story of Virginia’s Civil War Governor. University, Ala.: University of Alabama Press, 1966.


Websites


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Letcher - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (471 words)
John Letcher (1813-1884) of Lexington, Virginia, was an American lawyer, journalist, politician, served as Representative in U.S. Congress (1851-1859), Governor of Virginia (1860-1864), Delegate in Virginia General Assembly 1875-1877, and on the Board of Visitors of Virginia Military Institute 1866-1880.
John Letcher was born in the town of Lexington in Rockbridge County, Virginia.
John Letcher was elected as Governor of Virginia in 1859, and served from 1860-1864.
John Letcher Biography | Encyclopedia of World Biography (452 words)
John Letcher was born in Lexington, Va., on March 29, 1813.
Letcher attended the state constitutional convention of 1850-1851 and was a vigorous advocate of retaining the Caucasian basis of representation in both houses of the legislature.
Letcher was nominated by the Virginia Democratic party for the governorship in 1859 and was elected by a slight margin after a spirited campaign.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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