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Encyclopedia > John Lennon
John Lennon
John Lennon in the photo taken by John Kelly to promote The White Album
John Lennon in the photo taken by John Kelly to promote The White Album
Background information
Birth name John Winston Lennon (later changed to John Winston Ono Lennon)
Born October 9, 1940
Liverpool, England
Died December 8, 1980
New York City, New York, USA
Genre(s)
Psychedelic Rock
Rock
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, poet, activist
Instrument(s) Guitar
Harmonica
Piano
Bass
Melodica
Banjo
Years active 1957-1975, 1980
Label(s) Parlophone
Capitol
Apple
Vee-Jay Records
EMI
Geffen Records
Associated
acts
The Beatles
Plastic Ono Band
The Dirty Mac
Website Official website

John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. He and fellow-Beatle Paul McCartney formed the massively successful Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership throughout the 1960s, writing songs for The Beatles and other artists to record.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata JohnLennonWhiteAlbum. ... The White Album redirects here. ... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... Template:Warningbox Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in North West England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... A music genre is a category (or genre) of pieces of music that share a certain style or basic musical language (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... Psychedelic rock is a musical style inspired by or attempting to replicate the mind-altering experience of drugs such as cannabis, psilocybin, mescaline, salvia divinorum, and especially LSD. There are also other forms of psychedelic music that started from the same roots and diverged from the prevalent rock style into... Rock is a form of popular music from the mid 20th century which typically features a vocal melody (often with vocal harmony) that is supported by accompaniment of electric guitars, a bass guitar, and drums, often with a strong back beat. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... A poet is some one who writes poetry. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Classical and Bass Guitar The guitar is a fretted and stringed musical instrument, used in a wide variety of musical styles, and is also widely known as a solo classical instrument. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Harmonica A harmonica is a free reed musical wind instrument (also known, among other things, as a mouth organ or mouth harp, Hobo Harp, French harp, tin sandwich, lickin stick, blues harp, simply harp, or Mississippi saxophone), having multiple, variably-tuned brass... A grand piano, with the lid up. ... Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case. ... A Hohner melodica The melodica is a free-reed instrument similar to the accordion and harmonica. ... Old 6-string zither banjo For other uses, see Banjo (disambiguation) The banjo is a stringed instrument of African American origin, early or original examples sometimes being called the gourd banjo. One African banjo predecessor is called the Akonting. ... See also: 1956 in music, other events of 1957, 1958 in music, 1950s in music and the list of years in music // Events Pat Boone stars in his first two Hollywood motion pictures: Bernadine and April Love Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Será, Será), from 1956s Alfred Hitchcock... See also: 1974 in music, other events of 1975, 1976 in music, 1970s in music and the list of years in music // Events January 2 - New York City U.S. District Court Judge Richard Owen rules that former Beatle John Lennon and his lawyers can have access to Department of... See also: 1979 in music, other events of 1980, 1981 in music, 1980s in music and the list of years in music // [edit] Events [edit] January January 1 - Cliff Richard is appointed an MBE by Queen Elizabeth II. The only other pop music acts to be created MBEs are the... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Parlophone is a record label which was founded in Germany prior to World War I by the Carl Lindstrom Company. ... Capitol Records is a major United States-based record label, owned by EMI. // The Capitol Records company was founded by the songwriter Johnny Mercer in 1942, with the financial help of movie producer Buddy DeSylva and the business acumen of Glenn Wallichs, (1910-1971) (owner of Music City, at the... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ... Vee-Jay Records was a record label, specializing in blues, rhythm and blues and rock and roll. ... The EMI Group is a major record label, based in Kensington in London, in the United Kingdom. ... Geffen Records is an American record label, owned by Universal Music Group. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ... The Plastic Ono Band is the band John Lennon formed after he left the Beatles. ... The Dirty Mac was the name of a British supergroup which consisted of John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Mitch Mitchell that John put together for The Rolling Stones ill-fated TV special entitled The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus. ... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are... October 9 is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... Ercole de Roberti performing the song Freinds Of P: Concert, c. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ... Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE, (born June 18, 1942) is an English songwriter, musician and singer, best known as a member of The Beatles and one half of the songwriting partnership known as Lennon/McCartney. ... The songwriting credit Lennon/McCartney appears on all Beatles songs that were written by John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ...


Lennon's songwriting was often full of pain and hope. His melodies were at times beautiful and at times dark. His lyrics reflected his personal and career demands, philosophical outlook, his unease with his fame, and current events. As a writing pair, Lennon's hard-edged and McCartney's optimistic styles complemented one another. The Beatles, largely under Lennon and McCartney's influence and with their record producer George Martin, revolutionised rock music with their lyrics, instrumentation, harmony, and electronic effects, changing the nature of popular music at the time and paving the way for the music of the 1970s,  1980s and beyond. In his solo career distinct from The Beatles, Lennon wrote and recorded songs that became icons of the age, such as "Imagine" and "Give Peace a Chance". Look up Fame in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Fame may refer to a number of different topics, including: Fame, the condition of being known to the general public. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rock is a form of popular music from the mid 20th century which typically features a vocal melody (often with vocal harmony) that is supported by accompaniment of electric guitars, a bass guitar, and drums, often with a strong back beat. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Imagine is a utopian song performed by John Lennon, which appears on his 1971 album Imagine. ... Give Peace a Chance was a hit song written by John Lennon and originally credited to Lennon-McCartney. ...


Lennon, on television and in films such as A Hard Day's Night (1964), and by press conferences and interviews, revealed his rebellious, iconoclastic nature and quick, irreverent wit. He channeled his fame and penchant for controversy into his work as a peace activist, artist and author. Film is a term that encompasses motion pictures as individual projects, as well as the field in general. ... // The British release A Hard Days Night was The Beatles third album, released in 1964 as the soundtrack to their first film of the same name. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Drawing is the act of defining (or delineating) the outlines of a figure against a background, using any of a wide variety of tools and techniques. ... The term writer can apply to anyone who creates a written work, but the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ...


He had one son, Julian, with his first wife, Cynthia; he later married his second wife, avant-garde artist Yoko Ono, and they had one son, Sean. John Lennon was murdered in New York City on December 8, 1980 by a deranged fan, as he and Ono returned home from a recording session; he was, and continues to be, mourned throughout the world. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cynthia Powell Lennon, (born September 10, 1939), was the first wife of Beatle John Lennon. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ... Sean Taro Ono Lennon (aka Sean Ono Lennon, born October 9, 1975) is the son of musician and peace activist John Lennon by his second wife, artist Yoko Ono. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


In 2002, the BBC polled the British public about the 100 Greatest Britons of all time. Respondents voted Lennon into eighth place. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... // In 2002, the BBC conducted a vote to discover the 100 Greatest Britons of all time. ...

Contents

Youth

Parents

John Lennon was born in Liverpool to Julia Stanley Lennon and Alfred "Freddie" Lennon, supposedly during the course of a German air raid during the World War II Battle of Britain. (Historical records show a minor raid on Merseyside during the night of 9-10 October.) Lennon's father, a merchant seaman, walked out on the family when John was five years old. Years later Lennon met him again, during the height of Beatlemania. Both of his parents had musical backgrounds and experience, though neither pursued music seriously. Template:Warningbox Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough in North West England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... John Lennon John Winston Lennon, later John Ono Lennon, (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), was best known as a singer, songwriter, and guitarist for The Beatles. ... Alfred Freddie Lennon (14 December 1912—1 April 1976) was the Father of British musician John Lennon. ... Strategic bombing is a military strategem used in a total war style campaign that attempts to destroy the economic ability of a nation-state to wage war. ... Combatants Major Allied powers: United Kingdom Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Major Axis powers: Nazi Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Harry Truman Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead... Combatants United Kingdom Germany Commanders Hugh Dowding Hermann Göring Albert Kesselring Strength 700+ Grew to nearly 1000 during end of the Battle. ... Arms of the former Merseyside Metropolitan County Council Merseyside is a metropolitan county, located in the North West of England. ... In most seafaring countries, the merchant marine (or merchant navy) is a fleet of ships used for commerce that sometimes complements the navy. ... The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ...


Aunt Mimi and Uncle George

Due to a lack of home space and concerns expressed about her relationship with a male friend, John's mother handed over his care to her sister, Mary Smith (known as Mimi), after receiving a considerable amount of pressure from both Mimi and child services to do so. Throughout the rest of his childhood and adolescence, Lennon lived with his "Aunt Mimi" and her husband, George Smith at 251 Menlove Avenue, Mendips, Liverpool. Mary Elizbeth Mimi Smith, (neé Stanley, 1903 - 1992) was the Maternal aunt of of British musician John Lennon. ... The name George Smith refers to a number of people: George Smith, former valet and footman to Charles, Prince of Wales George Smith, Victorian Assyriologist George Smith, founder of the Glenlivet Distillery in Ballindalloch, Scotland George Smith southeast London architect George Smith, Republican representative for Pennsylvania (1809-1812) George Smith... Mendips is the childhood home of John Lennon, singer and songwriter with the Beatles. ...


He was raised as an Anglican. Like much of the population of Liverpool, Lennon had some Irish heritage. While Lennon had little exposure to his Irish background growing up, he came to identify with it later in life. He lived in a fairly middle class section of Liverpool. The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ...


Mimi and George, who had no children of their own, became strong parental figures to Lennon. On 15 July, 1958, when Lennon was 17, his mother was struck and killed by a car driven by a drunk, off-duty police officer, as she returned from Mimi's house. Julia Lennon's death was one of the factors that cemented his friendship with McCartney, who had lost his own mother to breast cancer in 1956, when he was 14. Years later, Lennon named his firstborn son Julian after his mother, and later wrote a song, "Julia", as a love song for her. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Julia is a song by The Beatles. ...


School

Lennon attended Dovedale County Primary School until he passed his Eleven-Plus, and from September 1952 to 1957 he attended Quarry Bank Grammar School in Liverpool, which he referred to as the start of his misery. He was a trouble-maker there and did little work, sinking to the "C-stream". He started drawing cartoons, and making fun of his teachers by mimicking their odd characteristics. Dovedale County Primary School is a small school in the Mossley Hill area of South Liverpool. ... The Eleven Plus is an examination which was given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom under the Tripartite System. ... Calderstones School is an English comprehensive school located on Harthill Road in the Liverpool suburb of Allerton. ... An impressionist is a performer whose act consists of giving the impression of being someone else by imitating the other persons voice and mannerisms. ...


Though failing at his exams by one grade at grammar school, Lennon was accepted into the Liverpool College of Art with help from his school's headmaster and his Aunt Mimi, who was insistent that her young ward should have some sort of academic qualifications. It was there that he met his future wife, Cynthia Powell. Lennon would steadily grow to hate the conformity of art school, which proved to be little different from his earlier school experience, and ultimately he dropped out. Grammar school can refer to various types of schools in different English-speaking countries. ... Liverpool College of Art Hope Street, Liverpool, England. ... In the UK and elsewhere, a head teacher is the most senior teacher in a school. ... Cynthia Powell Lennon (born September 10, 1939) was the first wife of John Lennon. ...


The move to music

He then devoted himself to music, inspired by American rock 'n' roll with singers/musicians like Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Little Richard. Mimi bought him his first guitar, but hoped that he would soon grow bored of it. Though she loved John, Mimi was skeptical about a lot of things, including his claim that one day he would be famous, telling him frequently, "The guitar's all very well, John, but you'll never make a living out of it." Years later, when The Beatles were the top act in show business, he presented her with a silver platter, engraved with those words. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer and actor. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born October 18, 1926) is an American guitarist, singer, and song writer. ... Charles Hardin Holley (September 7, 1936 – February 3, 1959), better known as Buddy Holly, was an American singer, songwriter, and a pioneer of Rock and Roll. ... Little Richard (born Richard Wayne Penniman, December 5, 1932 in Macon, Georgia) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist, an early pioneer of Rock n Roll, Penniman has influenced generations of R&B and Rock artists. ... Classical and Bass Guitar The guitar is a fretted and stringed musical instrument, used in a wide variety of musical styles, and is also widely known as a solo classical instrument. ...


Early bands

Lennon started a skiffle band in grammar school that was called The Quarry Men after his alma mater, Quarry Bank Grammar School. With the addition of Paul McCartney and George Harrison, the band switched to playing rock 'n' roll, taking the name "Johnny and The Moondogs", followed by "The Silver Beetles" , which was later shortened to The Beatles spelled with an "a" in reference to their identification with "beat groups". Skiffle music is a type of folk music with a jazz and blues influence, usually using homemade or improvised instruments such as the washboard, tea-chest bass, kazoo, cigar-box fiddle, or a comb and paper, and so forth. ... The Quarry Men were a little-known skiffle group formed around Liverpool, England in March 1957 by John Lennon. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Beatles were a pop and rock music group from Liverpool, England, who continue to be held in the very highest regard for their artistic achievements, their huge commercial success, and their groundbreaking role in the history of popular music. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ...


Role in the Beatles

Main article: The Beatles
John Lennon in 1964.
John Lennon in 1964.

The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (497x621, 52 KB) Cropped part of Image:Beatles. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (497x621, 52 KB) Cropped part of Image:Beatles. ...

Leader

Lennon was usually considered the "leader" of The Beatles, as he founded the original group, inviting his art school friend Stuart Sutcliffe and McCartney to join; McCartney in turn invited Harrison. But most group decisions were democratic, with the unwritten rule that if any member objected to an idea, the group wouldn't pursue it. A self portrait by Sutcliffe. ...


Lennon usually played rhythm guitar,[2] while George Harrison played lead guitar and McCartney bass guitar after bassist Sutcliffe left the group. Lennon also frequently played keyboards, as did McCartney. Ringo Starr, brought into the group last, played drums. Lennon often sang lead, with McCartney and Harrison providing the harmony parts; or Lennon would take the harmony role when McCartney, Harrison, or Starr were singing lead, especially in live performances. As recording technology improved, and they were doing more work in the studio than live, overdubbing was used so that Lennon might provide the harmony parts as well as the lead for his songs. The unique and recognizable "Beatles" sound, however, was the classic three-part harmony with Lennon or McCartney at lead and harmony provided by the others. Rhythm guitar is a kind of guitar playing that provides accompaniment for a singer or other instruments. ... Lead guitar refers to a role within a popular music band, especially a rock band, that provides melody or melodic material, as opposed to the rhythm of the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums. ... Martin EB18 Bass Guitar in flight case. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born July 7, 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is a popular English musician, singer, and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Overdubbing is a technique used by recording studios to add a supplementary recorded sound to a previously taped musical recording. ...


"More popular than Jesus" controversy

Lennon often spoke his mind freely, and reporters were used to querying him on a wide range of subjects. On 4 March 1966, Lennon was interviewed for the London Evening Standard by Maureen Cleave, who was a friend, and made an off-the-cuff remark regarding religion.[3] March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... Maureen Cleave was a journalist with the London Evening News and London Evening Standard who conducted interviews with famous musicians of the 1960s, including Bob Dylan and John Lennon. ...

"Christianity will go. It will vanish and shrink. ... I don't know what will go first, rock 'n' roll or Christianity. We're more popular than Jesus now. Jesus was all right, but his disciples were thick and ordinary. It's them twisting it that ruins it for me."

The article was printed and nothing came of it — until five months later, when an American teen magazine called Datebook reprinted part of the quote on its front cover.[4] Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on Jesus of Nazareth, and on his life, death, ressurection, and teachings as presented in the New Testament. ... Jesus (8–2 BC/BCE to 29–36 AD/CE),[1] also known as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity. ... In Christianity, the disciples were the students of Jesus during his ministry. ...


A firestorm of protest erupted across the American Bible Belt in the South and Midwest, as conservative groups staged public burnings of Beatles records and memorabilia. (The Beatles at first viewed this in a wry way, saying, "They've got to buy them first before they burn 'em.") Many radio stations banned Beatles music, and some concert venues cancelled performances. Even the Vatican got involved, issuing a public denunciation of Lennon's comments. The approximate extent of the Bible Belt, indicated in red A Bible Belt is an area in which socially conservative Christian Evangelical Protestantism is a pervasive or dominant part of the culture. ... Southern United States The states shown in dark red are usually included in the South, while all or portions of the striped states may or may not be considered part of the Southern United States. ... The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Social conservatism is a belief in traditional or natural law-based morality and social mores and the desire to preserve these in present day society, often through civil law or regulation. ... A souvenir stall in London, England A souvenir (from the French for memory) is an object that is treasured for the memories associated with it. ...


On August 11, 1966, The Beatles held a press conference in Chicago, in order to address the growing furor. August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook Incorporated March 4, 1837 Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area    - City 606. ...

Lennon: I suppose if I had said television was more popular than Jesus, I would have got away with it, but I just happened to be talking to a journalist friend [Maureen Cleave], and I used the words "Beatles" as a remote thing, not as what I think — as Beatles, as those other Beatles, like other people see us. I just said "they" are having more influence on kids and things than anything else, including Jesus. But I said it in that way, which is the wrong way.
Reporter: Some teenagers have repeated your statements — "I like The Beatles more than Jesus Christ." What do you think about that?
Lennon: Well, originally I pointed out that fact in reference to England. That we meant more to kids than Jesus did, or religion at that time. I wasn't knocking it or putting it down. I was just saying it as a fact, and it's true more for England than here. I'm not saying that we're better or greater, or comparing us with Jesus Christ as a person or God as a thing, or whatever it is. I just said what I said and it was wrong. Or it was taken wrong. And now it's all this.
Reporter: But are you prepared to apologise?
Lennon: I wasn't saying whatever they're saying I was saying. I'm sorry I said it really. I never meant it to be a lousy anti-religious thing. I apologise if that will make you happy. I still don't know quite what I've done. I've tried to tell you what I did do, but if you want me to apologise, if that will make you happy, then OK, I'm sorry.

The governing members of the Vatican accepted his apology; however, the Southern Baptist Convention, the predominant religion in the U.S. Bible Belt, did not. [5] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) is a United States-based cooperative ministry agency serving Baptist churches around the world. ...


No more touring

The furor eventually died down, but constant Beatlemania, mobs, crazed teenagers, and now a press ready to tear them to pieces over any quote was too much to handle. The Beatles soon decided to stop touring, and never performed a scheduled concert again. A firework was thrown on the stage at one of their last concerts and McCartney later said that the band all looked at Lennon - fearing a gun had been fired at him. The pressure of dealing with incidents like that convinced even McCartney to say that he had had enough. Lennon wrote later "I always remember to thank Jesus for the end of my touring days."


"Turn on, tune in, drop out"

Lennon largely abandoned his leadership role under the influence of LSD and Timothy Leary's book The Psychedelic Experience, believing he needed to "lose his ego" to become enlightened. He resented McCartney's taking effective control of the band after Brian Epstein's death in 1967, and disliked some of the resulting projects, such as Magical Mystery Tour, and particularly Let It Be ("That film was set up by Paul, for Paul," as he said later to Rolling Stone). Lennon was the first to break the band's all-for-one sensibility, and also the rule that no wives or girlfriends would attend recording sessions, as he brought Yoko into the studio. Turn On, Tune In, Drop Out (Original Movie Soundtrack) Turn on, tune in, drop out is a counterculture phrase coined by Timothy Leary in the 1960s. ... For other uses, see LSD (disambiguation). ... For the American baseball player use Tim Leary (baseball player) Timothy Francis Leary, Ph. ... Brian Epstein, The Beatles manager and a force behind the groups early success. ... Magical Mystery Tour is an album by British rock band The Beatles, first released in late November 1967. ... Let It Be was an album by The Beatles, released on May 8, 1970. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ...


Lennon was also the first member to permanently quit the group (Starr had left during 1968, but was persuaded to return; Harrison walked out on a filming session early in 1969, but turned up at a business meeting a few days later), which he did in September 1969. He agreed not to make an announcement while the band renegotiated their recording contract, and blasted McCartney months later (with the negotiations complete) for going public with his own departure in April 1970. With the public unaware of the details, McCartney appeared to be the one who dissolved the group, depriving Lennon of the formalities. Lennon told Rolling Stone "I was a fool not to do what Paul did, which was use it to sell a record," and later wrote "I started the band. I finished it."


McCartney later admitted Lennon had been the first to quit, re-explaining the circumstances to CBS-TV's 48 Hours in 1989. In a subsequent Playboy interview,[6] McCartney asserted "We all looked up to John. He was older and he was very much the leader; he was the quickest wit and the smartest and all that kind of thing." radio and United States. ... 48 Hours Logo 48 Hours is a documentary and news program broadcast on the CBS television network since Jan. ... Playboy is an American adult entertainment magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ...


Lennon and his families

Lennon is alleged to have slapped his first wife, Cynthia, in the early years of their relationship, as she claimed in her book, John. The rise of Beatlemania and rigours of touring only furthered the strain on the relationship. He was also distant to his son, Julian, who felt closer to McCartney than to him. As the younger Lennon later said, "I've never really wanted to know the truth about how dad was with me. There was some very negative stuff talked about me... like when he said I'd come out of a whiskey bottle on a Saturday night. Stuff like that. You think, where's the love in that? Paul and I used to hang about quite a bit... more than dad and I did. We had a great friendship going and there seems to be far more pictures of me and Paul playing together at that age than there are pictures of me and my dad."


John is quoted as saying: "Sean is a planned child, and therein lies the difference. I don't love Julian any less as a child. He's still my son, whether he came from a bottle of whiskey or because they didn't have pills in those days. He's here, he belongs to me, and he always will." Sean Taro Ono Lennon (aka Sean Ono Lennon, born October 9, 1975) is the son of musicians and peace activists John Lennon and Yoko Ono (Kyoko Chan Cox and Julian Lennon are therefore his half-siblings). ...


According to Cynthia, after the break-up with John, Paul visited Cynthia and jokingly suggested marriage. He is reported as saying, "How's about you and me, Cyn?" After that visit, he did not stay in touch with her, and in her book John, she published a copy of the first postcard from Paul — after 17 years of no contact — that he sent to her.


In the last major interview of his life conducted in September 1980, three months before his death — published in the January 1981 issue of Playboy— Lennon said that he'd always been very macho and had never questioned his chauvinistic attitudes towards women until he met Yoko Ono. By the end of his life, he had embraced the role of househusband and even said that he had taken on the role of wife and mother in their relationship. While Lennon was always distant with his first son (Julian) he was very close to his second son (Sean), and called him "my pride". Lennon also spoke about having a child with Ono: "We were both finally unselfish enough to want to have a child." Playboy is an American adult entertainment magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... Chauvinism is extreme and unreasoning partisanship on behalf of a group to which one belongs, especially when the partisanship includes malice and hatred towards a rival group. ... A stereotypical housewife A homemaker is a person whose prime occupation is to care for their family and home. ...


In the same interview, Lennon said he was trying to re-establish a connection with the then 17-year-old Julian, and confidently predicted that "Julian and I will have a relationship in the future." [7]


Both Julian and Sean Lennon went on to have recording careers years after their father's death.


Lennon and Yoko Ono

John Lennon and Yoko Ono with Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, 22 December 1969 Ottawa, Ontario
John Lennon and Yoko Ono with Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, 22 December 1969 Ottawa, Ontario

On November 9, 1966, after their final tour ended and right after he had wrapped up filming a minor role in the film How I Won the War, Lennon visited an art exhibit of Yoko Ono's at the Indica art gallery at No. 6, Mason's Yard in London. Lennon began his love affair with Ono in 1968 after returning from India and leaving his estranged wife Cynthia; Cynthia filed for divorce later that year, on the grounds of John's adultery with Ono which was evidenced by Yoko's apparent pregnancy and miscarriage of their son. Lennon and Ono became inseparable in public and private, as well as during Beatles recording sessions. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ... The Prime Minister of Canada, the head of the Canadian government, is usually the leader of the political party with the most seats in the Canadian House of Commons. ... Trudeau redirects here. ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... How I Won the War is a 1967 film directed by Richard Lester. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... The unborn baby of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, conceived during the spring of 1968 and miscarried by Ono on November 21 of that year. ...


The press was extremely unkind to Ono, posting a series of unflattering articles about her - frequently with racist overtones - with one even going so far as to call her "ugly". This infuriated Lennon, who rallied around his new partner and said publicly that there was no John and Yoko, but that they were one person, "JohnAndYoko". These developments led to friction with the other members of the group, and heightened the tension during the 1968 White Album sessions. The White Album redirects here. ...


At the end of 1968, Lennon and Ono performed as Dirty Mac on The Rolling Stones' Rock and Roll Circus. During his last two years as a member of The Beatles, Lennon spent much of his time with Ono partaking in public protests against the Vietnam War. He sent back his MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) (which he had received from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II during the height of Beatlemania) "in protest against Britain's involvement in the Nigeria-Biafra thing and its support of America in Vietnam," adding as a joke, "as well as 'Cold Turkey' slipping down the charts." Dirty Mac was the name of John Lennons performance project in The Rolling Stones 1968 television project The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Special Theatre Version: The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, 2004. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Commanders Badge of the Order of the British Empire The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of 16 sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... National motto: Peace, Unity, Freedom Official language Igbo, English Capital Enugu Largest city Port Harcourt Head of State Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu Chief of General Staff (VP) Philip Effiong Area ?- Total ?- % water Population;- Total 13,500,000 (1967) Currency Biafran pound (BIAP) Created May 30, 1967 Dissolved January 15, 1970 National... Cold Turkey was a 1969 single by John Lennon and The Plastic Ono Band. ...


On March 20, 1969, Lennon and Ono were married in Gibraltar, and spent their honeymoon in Amsterdam in a "Bed-In" for peace. Behind their bed were posters displaying the words "Hair Peace. Bed Peace." They followed up their honeymoon with another "Bed-In" for peace, this time held in Montreal at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel. During the second "Bed-In" the couple recorded "Give Peace a Chance", which would go on to become an international anthem for the peace movement. They were mainly patronised as a couple of eccentrics by the media, yet they did a great deal for the peace movement, as well as for other related causes, such as feminism and racial harmony. As with the "Bed-In" campaign, Lennon and Ono usually advocated their causes with whimsical demonstrations, such as Bagism, first introduced during a Vienna press conference. Shortly after, Lennon changed his name to John Winston Ono Lennon. Lennon wrote "The Ballad of John and Yoko" about his marriage and the subsequent press it generated. March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 741,329 (1 August 2006) Demonym Amsterdammer Coordinates Website www. ... John Lennon and Yoko Onos Bed-In video During the Vietnam War in 1969 John Lennon and Yoko Ono held two week-long Bed-Ins for Peace, which were their non-violent ways of protesting wars and promoting peace. ... Motto: Concordia Salus Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 City Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area    - City 366. ... Queen Elizabeth Hotel, with Mary, Queen of the World Cathedral in the foreground Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth, commonly called The Queen Elizabeth Hotel (Le Reine Elizabeth), is a grand hotel in Montreal, Quebec. ... Give Peace a Chance was a hit song written by John Lennon and originally credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Feminism is a diverse collection of social theories, political movements and moral philosophies, largely motivated by or concerned with the experiences of women. ... Bagism is a term which was created by Yoko Ono and the late Beatle, John Lennon, as part of their extensive peace campaign in the late 1960s. ... The Ballad of John and Yoko is a Beatles song written by John Lennon. ...


The Break-up of The Beatles

Portrait of John Lennon by Richard Avedon.
Portrait of John Lennon by Richard Avedon.

The failed Get Back/Let It Be recording/filming sessions did nothing to improve relations within the band. After both Lennon and Ono were injured in the summer of 1969 in a car accident in Scotland, Lennon arranged for Ono to be constantly with him in the studio (including having a full-sized bed rolled in) as he worked on The Beatles' last album, Let It Be. While the group managed to hang together to produce one last acclaimed musical work, soon thereafter business issues related to Apple Corps came between them. Image File history File links JohnLennonByAvedon. ... Image File history File links JohnLennonByAvedon. ... Richard Avedon (May 15, 1923 – October 1, 2004) was an American photographer. ... Let It Be is the title of a 1970 documentary about The Beatles. ... Motto: (Eng: No one provokes me with impunity)1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots 2 Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen of the UK Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of the UK Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by... Let It Be was an album by The Beatles, released on May 8, 1970. ... Apple Records logo, featuring a Granny Smith apple. ...


Lennon decided to quit The Beatles but was talked out of saying anything publicly. Phil Spector's involvement in trying to revive the Let It Be material then drove a further wedge between Lennon (who supported Spector) and McCartney (who opposed him). Though the split would only become legal some time later, Lennon and McCartney's partnership had come to a bitter end. McCartney soon made a press announcement, declaring he had quit The Beatles, and promoting his new solo record. Harvey Phillip Spector (born December 26, 1940) is an American record producer of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Let It Be is the twelfth and final album by The Beatles, released on May 8, 1970 by the bands own Apple Records label. ...


In 1970, Jann Wenner recorded an interview with Lennon that was played on BBC in 2005. The interview reveals his bitterness towards McCartney and the hostility he felt that the other members held towards Yoko Ono. Lennon said: "One of the main reasons The Beatles ended is because... I pretty well know, we got fed up with being sidemen for Paul. After Brian Epstein died we collapsed. Paul took over and supposedly led us. But what is leading us when we went round in circles? Paul had the impression we should be thankful for what he did, for keeping The Beatles going. But he kept it going for his own sake."[8] 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brian Epstein, The Beatles manager and a force behind the groups early success. ...


Solo career

John Lennon, early 1970; his Beatle locks shorn — as were Yoko's — for a charity auction.
John Lennon, early 1970; his Beatle locks shorn — as were Yoko's — for a charity auction.

Of the four former Beatles, Lennon had perhaps the most varied recording career. While he was still a Beatle, Lennon and Ono recorded three albums of experimental and difficult music, Unfinished Music No.1: Two Virgins, Unfinished Music No.2: Life with the Lions, and Wedding Album. His first 'solo' album of popular music was Live Peace in Toronto 1969, recorded in 1969 (prior to the breakup of The Beatles) at the Rock 'n' Roll Festival in Toronto with The Plastic Ono Band, which included Eric Clapton and Klaus Voormann. Apparently, they learned the whole set of songs on the plane from England to Canada. Lennon remembered that the conversation was mostly questions like, "Is it in E, or A?" Image File history File links John Lennon promotional image This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work in the media. ... Unfinished Music No. ... Unfinished Music No. ... The Wedding Album was an experimental album released by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969. ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and mostly distributed commercially. ... Live Peace in Toronto 1969 is a live album recorded by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969 in Toronto, Canada, at a rock and roll revival show. ... The Plastic Ono Band is the conceptual group John Lennon and Yoko Ono formed in 1969 before the dissolution of The Beatles. ... An example of the famous Clapton is God graffiti craze Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE (born March 30, 1945), nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award winning English guitarist, singer and composer, who is one of the most respected and influential musicians of the rock era, garnering an unprecedented three inductions into... Klaus Voormann (born April 29, 1942) is a German artist, musician, and record producer who was associated with the early days of The Beatles in Hamburg and later designed the cover of their album Revolver. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


He also recorded three singles in his initial solo phase, the anti-war anthem "Give Peace a Chance", "Cold Turkey" (about his struggles with heroin addiction) and "Instant Karma!" Give Peace a Chance was a hit song written by John Lennon and originally credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... Cold Turkey was a 1969 single by John Lennon and The Plastic Ono Band. ... Heroin or diamorphine (INN) (colloquially referred to as junk, babania, horse, golden brown, smack, black tar, big H, lady H, dope, skag, juice, diesel, etc. ... Instant Karma! (We All Shine On) was John Lennons third solo single on Apple Records, and is notable for three reasons. ...


Following The Beatles' split in 1970, Lennon released the John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band album, a raw, brutally personal recording, which was directly inspired by what he had experienced earlier that year while going through Primal therapy with Dr. Arthur Janov in Los Angeles. (For more on this subject, see the webpage, "John Lennon - Primal therapy,"which includes an account of one of John's therapy sessions written by Pauline Lennon.) The influence of the therapy, which in part consists of screaming out one's emotional pain, is apparent in songs like "Mother" ("Mama don't go!/Daddy come home!"), "Remember," "Isolation," "I Found Out", "My Mummy's Dead," and "Well Well Well". John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band is John Lennons first official solo album, released in 1970 after having issued three experimental albums with Yoko Ono and Live Peace In Toronto 1969, a live performance in Toronto credited to The Plastic Ono Band. ... Primal therapy is a trauma-based psychotherapy developed and popularized by Arthur Janov, Ph. ... Dr. Arthur Janov is the inventor of Primal therapy and directs a Primal Center in Venice, California, USA. He is a licensed psychologist in that state. ... The single Mother is an edited version of the lead-off track from John Lennons 1970 album John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. ...


The centrepiece of the album is "God", in which he lists all of the people and things he no longer believes in -- ending with "Beatles". Lennon's growing political radicalisation is especially evident in the song "Working Class Hero", whose lyrics show clear traces of Primal therapy all the way through (beginning with "As soon as you're born they make you feel small ... 'til the pain is so big you feel nothing at all"). The song's repeated use of the word "fucking" got it banned from the airwaves. Lennon continued his effort to demythologise his old band and reclaim his individuality with a lengthy, no-holds barred interview published in Rolling Stone magazine. Many consider Plastic Ono Band to be a major influence on later hard rock and punk music. God is a song from John Lennons first post-Beatles solo album, John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band. ... Working Class Hero is a song from John McPeniss first post-Beatles solo album, 1970s John McPenis/Plastic Ono Band. ... Rolling Stone is an American magazine devoted to music, politics and popular culture. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ...


That album was followed in 1971 by Imagine, Lennon's most successful solo album, which alternates in tone between dreaminess and anger. The title track has become an anthem for anti-religion and anti-war movements, and was matched in image by Lennon's "white period" (white clothes, white piano, white room, etc.). He specifically wrote one track, "How Do You Sleep?" as a biting personal attack against McCartney, but later admitted that, in the end, it was really about himself. George Harrison played slide guitar on the incisive song. Imagine is John Lennons second solo album and is the most popular of his solo works. ... Imagine is a utopian song performed by John Lennon, which appears on his 1971 album Imagine. ... How Do You Sleep? is a song from John Lennons 1971 album Imagine, in which he implicitly disparages former Beatles songwriting partner Paul McCartney. ...


Perhaps in reaction, his next album, Some Time in New York City (1972), was loud, raucous, and explicitly political, with songs about prison riots, racial and sexual relations, the British role in the sectarian troubles in Northern Ireland, and his own problems in obtaining a United States Green Card. Lennon had been interested in left-wing politics since the late 1960s, and was said to have given donations to the Trotskyist Workers Revolutionary Party.[9] Some Time in New York City is John Lennons third post-Beatles album, and fifth with Yoko Ono, and was released in 1972. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Motto: [citation needed] (French for God and my right)2 Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Irish, Ulster Scots 3, NI Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair... A United States Green Card. ... Trotskyism is the theory of Marxism as advocated by Leon Trotsky. ... Logo of the current Workers Revolutionary Party The Workers Revolutionary Party is a small Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ...


It was during the period of the recording of this album that his links to this group were perhaps at their strongest. On 30 August 1972 Lennon and his backing band Elephant's Memory staged two benefit concerts at Madison Square Garden in New York; it was to be his last full-length concert appearance. Lennon and Ono also did a week-long guest co-host stint on the Mike Douglas Show, in an appearance that showed Lennon's wit and humour still intact. August 30 is the 242nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (243rd in leap years), with 123 days remaining. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Elephants Memory were a New York band most notable for backing up John Lennon and Yoko Ono during 1972, on a pair of albums and a handful of TV and live appearances. ... A benefit concert is a concert featuring musicians, comedians, or other performers that is held for a charitable purpose, often directed at a specific and immediate humanitarian crisis. ... Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation). ...


In 1972, Lennon released an anti-sexism song, "Woman Is the Nigger of the World", implying that as black people were discriminated against in some countries, so were women globally. Radio refused to broadcast the song, and it was banned nearly everywhere, although he managed to play it to television viewers during his second appearance on The Dick Cavett Show. The sign of the headquarters of the National Association Opposed To Woman Suffrage Sexism is commonly considered to be discrimination and/or hatred against people based on their sex rather than their individual merits, but can also refer to any and all systemic differentiations based on the sex of the... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Dick Cavett Show has been the title of many talk shows hosted by Dick Cavett on several television networks, including: ABC daytime (March 4, 1968–January 24, 1969) (originally titled This Morning) ABC prime time (May 26–September 19, 1969) ABC late night (December 29, 1969–January 1, 1975...


Lennon rebounded in 1973 with Mind Games, which featured a strong title tune and some vague mumblings about a "conceptual country" called "Nutopia", which satirised his ongoing immigration case. His most striking song of that year was the wry "I'm the Greatest", which he wrote for Ringo Starr's very successful Ringo album. Mind Games is John Lennons fourth post-Beatles solo album, and was recorded and released in 1973. ... Im The Greatest is a song written by John Lennon for Ringo Starr. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born July 7, 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is a popular English musician, singer, and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Ringo is the third solo album by Ringo Starr, released in 1973. ...


The Anti-War Years and the Deportation Battle

Recording "Give Peace A Chance", by Roy Kerwood
Recording "Give Peace A Chance", by Roy Kerwood

"Give Peace a Chance", recorded in 1969 at the height of the Vietnam War, marked Lennon’s transformation from loveable mop-top to anti-war activist, and began a process that culminated in 1972, when the Nixon Administration sought to silence him by ordering him deported from the US. Image File history File links Jlbedin3. ... Image File history File links Jlbedin3. ... Give Peace a Chance was a hit song written by John Lennon and originally credited to Lennon-McCartney. ... See also: 1968 in music, other events of 1969, 1970 in music, 1960s in music and the list of years in music // Events Perhaps the most famous musical events of 1969 are two legendary concerts. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ...


The Vietnam War mobilized a great many young people to take a stand opposing US government policy, but few pop stars joined them: antiwar protest was more common among folk musicians like Phil Ochs, Joan Baez and Bob Dylan (the British musician Donovan was a notable exception). A U.S. postage stamp depicting the increase in birthrate experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of males returning to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II in many... Demonstrators march in the street while protesting the World Bank and International Monetary Fund on April 16, 2005. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940 – April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman on May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... Donovan Philips Leitch (usually known simply as Donovan) (born May 10, 1946, in Maryhill, Glasgow) is a Scottish musician. ...


Lennon, however, was determined to use his power as a superstar to help end the war, especially after he left the Beatles and teamed up with Yoko. The couple declared their honeymoon at the Amsterdam Hilton, in March 1969, a "bed-in for peace," winning world-wide media coverage. At a second "bed-in" in Montreal, in June 1969, they recorded "Give Peace a Chance" in their hotel room. Super Star (سوبر ستار) is an Arabic television show based on the popular British show Pop Idol & developed by Fremantle Media. ... A honeymoon is the traditional trip taken by newlyweds to celebrate their marriage. ... Amsterdam Location Flag Country Netherlands Province North Holland Population 741,329 (1 August 2006) Demonym Amsterdammer Coordinates Website www. ... The Hilton Hotel chain is owned by Hilton Hotels Corporation and is based in Beverly Hills, California. ... Motto: Concordia Salus Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 City Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area    - City 366. ...


The song quickly became the anthem of the anti-war movement, and was sung by as many as half a million demonstrators in Washington, D.C. at the second Vietnam Moratorium Day, in November 1969. They were led by the reknowned folk singer Pete Seeger, who interspersed phrases like, "Are you listening, Nixon?" and "Are you listening, Agnew?", between the choruses of protestors singing, "All we are saying... is give peace a chance".[10] An anthem is a choral composition to an English religious text sung in church services. ... The global peace movement refers to a sense of common purpose among organizations that seek to end wars and minimize inter-human violence, usually through pacifism, non-violent resistance, diplomacy, boycott, moral purchasing and demonstrating. ... A man carries a sign at the September 24, 2005 anti-war protest, a demonstration in Washington, D.C. American Civil Rights March on Washington, leaders marching from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial, August 28, 1963. ... Nickname: DC, The District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia. ... The Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam was a large demonstration against United States involvement in the Vietnam War that took place across the United States on October 15, 1969. ... Folk music, in the original sense of the term, is music by and of the people. ... Seegers album Clearwater Classics. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew, born Spiro Anagnostopoulos (November 9, 1918–September 17, 1996), was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon. ... A refrain (from the Old French refraindre to repeat, likely from Vulgar Latin refringere) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the chorus of a song. ...


When John and Yoko moved to New York City in August 1971, they became friends with antiwar leaders Jerry Rubin, Abbie Hoffman, and others, and planned a national concert tour to coincide with the 1972 presidential election. It would have been the first U.S. tour by any of the ex-Beatles since the lads had waved farewell at Candlestick Park in San Francisco at the end of their 1966 tour. But it would not have been the usual rock tour. 1972 was the first year 18-year-olds had been given the right to vote in the U.S., and Lennon wanted to help persuade young people to register to vote and to vote against the war — which meant voting against Nixon. Thus, the planned tour was to combine rock music with anti-war organizing and voter registration. Jerry Rubin (July 14, 1938 – November 28, 1994) was a high-profile American social activist during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Abbott Howard Abbie Hoffman (November 30, 1936 – April 12, 1989) was a social and political activist in the United States, co-founder of the Youth International Party (Yippies), and later, a fugitive from the law, who lived under an alias following a conviction for dealing cocaine. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Monster Park (colloquially, The Stick or Candlestick, after its original name of Candlestick Park) is an outdoor sports and entertainment stadium located in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Suffrage is the civil right to vote, or the exercise of that right. ... Voter registration is the requirement in some democracies for citizens to check in with some central registry before being allowed to vote in elections. ...


The Nixon Administration found out about Lennon's plans from an unlikely source: Republican Senator Strom Thurmond, who suggested in a February 1972 memo that "deportation would be a strategic counter-measure." The next month the Immigration and Naturalization Service began deportation proceedings against Lennon, arguing that his 1968 misdemeanour conviction for cannabis possession in London had made him ineligible for admission to the U.S. Lennon spent the next two years in and out of deportation hearings, and constantly under a 60-day order to leave the country, which his attorney managed to get extended repeatedly. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was a part of the United States Department of Justice which used to handle legal and illegal immigration and naturalization. ... Misdemeanors are lesser criminal acts which are generally punished less severely than felonies; but more so than infractions. ...


The 1972 concert tour never happened, but Lennon and his friends did put on one of the events they had been thinking about: the "Free John Sinclair" concert in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in December 1971. Sinclair was a local antiwar activist and poet who was serving ten years in state prison for selling two joints of marijuana to an undercover cop. Lennon and Ono appeared onstage (in his first live appearance since the Beatles' breakup) along with Phil Ochs, Stevie Wonder and other musicians, plus antiwar radical Jerry Rubin and Bobby Seale of the Black Panthers. Lennon performed the song, "John Sinclair", which he had just written, calling on the authorities to "Let him be, set him free, Let him be like you and me." Some 20,000 people attended the rally; two days after the concert, the state of Michigan released Sinclair from prison. (A recording of the live performance circulated for years in bootleg versions, and was later released on the 2-CD John Lennon Anthology [1998], as well as on the album, Acoustic [2004]).[11] John Sinclair (born October 2, 1941 in Flint, Michigan) was a Detroit poet, one time manager of the MC5 and leader of the White Panther Party, from November 1968-July 1969. ... Ann Arbor is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... A joint. ... A Cannabis sativa plant Look up marijuana in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Philip David Ochs (December 19, 1940 – April 9, 1976) was a U.S. protest singer (or, as he preferred, a topical singer), songwriter, musician and recording artist who was known for his sharp wit, sardonic humor, earnest humanism, political activism, insightful and alliterative lyrics, and haunting voice. ... Stevie Wonder (born Stevland Morris[1] on May 13, 1950), is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, musician, and social activist. ... The term Radical (latin radix meaning root) has been used since the late 18th century as a label in political science for those favoring or trying to produce thoroughgoing or extreme political reforms which can include changes to the social order to a greater or lesser extent. ... Jerry Rubin (July 14, 1938 – November 28, 1994) was a high-profile American social activist during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Bobby Seale Bobby Seale (born October 22, 1936) is an American civil rights activist, who along with Huey P. Newton co-founded the Black Panther Party in 1966. ... The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was a revolutionary Black nationalist organization in the United States that formed in the late 1960s and grew to national prominence before falling apart due to factional rivalries stirred up by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. ... A bootleg recording is a audio or video recording of a performance that was not officially released by the artist or under other legal authority. ... John Lennon Anthology is a box set of home demos, alternative studio outtakes and unreleased material recorded by John Lennon over the course of his solo career from Give Peace A Chance in 1969 up until the 1980 sessions for Double Fantasy and Milk And Honey. ... Acoustic is a live and acoustic album by John Lennon, released on November 2 2004. ...


While his deportation battle was going on, Lennon spoke often against the Vietnam War, appearing at rallies in New York City and on TV shows, including a week hosting the Mike Douglas Show in February 1972, where Jerry Rubin and Bobby Seale appeared as his guests. He was tailed by a team of FBI agents, who concluded "Lennon appears to be radically oriented however he does not give the impression he is a true revolutionist since he is constantly under the influence of narcotics." For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation). ...


In the end, Nixon left the White House in the Watergate scandal, and Lennon stayed in the USA, winning his green card in 1975. The full story didn't come out until after Lennon’s murder, when historian Jon Wiener filed a Freedom of Information request for FBI files on Lennon. The FBI admitted it had 281 pages of files on Lennon, but refused to release most of them, claiming they were national security documents. In 1983 Wiener sued the FBI with the help of the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court before the FBI settled it in 1997, releasing all but ten of the contested documents. (The pages are reproduced in the book Gimme Some Truth: The John Lennon FBI Files, by Jon Wiener; some of them are posted online at http://www.LennonFBIfiles.com.) The story is told in the documentary, "The U.S. Versus John Lennon," by David Leaf and John Scheinfeld, released by Lions Gate in September, 2006. The Watergate building. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Freedom of information can mean: whether a particular piece of information can be freely created, read, modified, copied and distributed; see free content (as well as free culture and free software) freedom to express ones opinions or ideas, generally, within a society; see freedom of speech the accessibility of... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is a major American non-profit organization with headquarters in New York City, whose stated mission is to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed to every person in this country by the Constitution and laws of the United States.[1] It... The U.S. Versus John Lennon is a film that is coming out in the United States, September 2006. ... Lions Gate Films is a Canadian film production and distribution company that is currently the largest and most successful independent film distributor/studio in North America. ...


The "lost weekend" period

In 1973, Yoko approached May Pang — their personal assistant at the time — with a unique proposal. Ono, who thought May Pang would be an "ideal companion" for Lennon, asked her to "be with John and to help him out and see to it that he gets whatever he wanted." Lennon's personal life then fell into disrepair after Yoko kicked him out of the house. Lennon and Pang soon moved to Los Angeles, a period which has been dubbed the "lost weekend", though it lasted until the beginning of 1975. During their time together, Pang encouraged Lennon to spend time with his son, Julian Lennon, and she became friends with Cynthia Lennon. May Pang (Fung Yee) was born to Chinese-American parents in Spanish Harlem in New York on October 24, 1950. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Cynthia Powell Lennon, (born September 10, 1939), was the first wife of Beatle John Lennon. ...


Lennon also spent his time during these months with his close friend, the singer/songwriter Harry Nilsson, and an assortment of his drinking buddies (Keith Moon, Ringo Starr, Alice Cooper, Micky Dolenz and others), who collectively dubbed themselves the Hollywood Vampires. Though Lennon's public drunkenness had been the subject of gossip during 1974, Pang wrote that he was usually sober in his private life and created a large body of work. One notable session, captured in the bootleg A Toot and a Snore in '74, saw Lennon and his new friends jamming with Paul McCartney. Harry Nilsson Harry Edward Nilsson III (June 15, 1941 – January 15, 1994) was an American songwriter, singer, pianist and guitarist, most popular during the 1960s and 1970s. ... Keith John Moon (August 23, 1946 – September 7, 1978) was the drummer of the rock group The Who. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born July 7, 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is a popular English musician, singer, and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Alice Cooper (born Vincent Damon Furnier, February 4, 1948), is a rock singer and musician, whose work spans four decades. ... George Michael Dolenz, Jr. ... A Toot and a Snore in 74 was a bootleg album of the final recording session in which John Lennon and Paul McCartney played together, which gained wider prominence when McCartney made reference to the session in a 1997 interview. ...


Despite publicised episodes of drunkenness, Lennon put together the well-received album, Walls and Bridges (1974), which featured a collaboration with Elton John on the up-tempo number one hit "Whatever Gets You Thru the Night". Another top ten hit from the album was the Beatlesque reverie "#9 Dream". Also, on the album, he made his last reference to Primal therapy in his song "Nobody Loves You (When You're Down and Out)", referring to Arthur Janov as "the one-eyed witch-doctor leading the blind." During 1974, Lennon also produced Nilsson's Pussy Cats album, and Nilsson worked with Ringo Starr on Apple Films' Son of Dracula and the accompanying soundtrack album. Walls and Bridges is an album by John Lennon released in 1974. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John, CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is an English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Whatever Gets You thru the Night was a song on John Lennons 1974 album Walls and Bridges. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... An atmospheric single featuring cellos in the hook. ... Dr. Arthur Janov is the inventor of Primal therapy and directs a Primal Center in Venice, California, USA. He is a licensed psychologist in that state. ... Pussy Cats is an album by Harry Nilsson released in 1974. ... Apple Films was the filmmaking division of the Beatles Apple Corps. ... Son of Dracula is a film released in 1974, starring Harry Nilsson and Ringo Starr. ...


Lennon capped the year by making a surprise guest appearance at an Elton John concert in Madison Square Garden where they performed "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", "Whatever Gets You Thru the Night" and "I Saw Her Standing There" together. It was to be his last-ever concert appearance in front of a rock audience. Following the performance, Lennon travelled to Florida and it was here that he signed the papers finally breaking up The Beatles legally. Following the Christmas holidays, he returned to Yoko Ono in New York. Madison Square Garden, often abbreviated as MSG, known colloquially simply as The Garden, has been the name of four arenas in New York City, United States. ... Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds is a song written mostly by John Lennon (with some material by Paul McCartney) in 1967 and recorded by The Beatles for their album, Sgt. ... I Saw Her Standing There is a song performed by The Beatles on their album Please Please Me. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christmas or Christmas Day is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ...

John Lennon’s last public performance on the TV special A Salute to Sir Lew Grade, 1975.
John Lennon’s last public performance on the TV special A Salute to Sir Lew Grade, 1975.

On 18 April, 1975, John Lennon made his last public appearance on ATV's special A Salute to Lew Grade. During the event Lennon performed "Imagine" and "Slippin' and Slidin" from his Rock 'n' Roll LP. John's bandmates, known as "Etc.", were costumed in two-faced masks during the performance. The "two-faced" stunt, and the line "... don't want to be your fool no more" (from "Slippin' and Slidin") were seen as digs at Grade, who Lennon and McCartney had been in conflict with due to his previous control of The Beatles publishing concerns "[12]. Dick James had sold the publishing to Grade from under the group in 1969. During "Imagine" Lennon interjects the line "... and no immigration too...", a reference to his then-unresolved battle to remain in the United States. Image File history File links Lennongrade. ... Image File history File links Lennongrade. ... Lew Grade, Baron Grade (birth name Louis Winogradsky) (December 25, 1906 - December 13, 1998) was an influential showbusiness impresario and television company executive in the United Kingdom. ... ATV can refer to: All-terrain vehicle, the a personal recreational vehicle normally consisting of a motorcycle-like engine, four balloon tires and a fiberglass body; a four-wheeler. ... Lew Grade, Baron Grade (birth name Louis Winogradsky) (December 25, 1906 - December 13, 1998) was an influential showbusiness impresario and television company executive in the United Kingdom. ... Rock n Roll is a 1975 album of late 1950s and early 1960s-era rock songs covered by John Lennon. ... Dick James; article image. ...


In 1975, Lennon released the Rock 'n' Roll album of cover versions of old rock and roll songs of his youth. This project was conceived several years earlier, and moved ahead in fits and starts. It was complicated by the unpredictable Phil Spector's involvement as producer and by several legal battles; the result received generally negative reviews, though it yielded a powerful, lauded cover of "Stand by Me". Rock n Roll is a 1975 album of late 1950s and early 1960s-era rock songs covered by John Lennon. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Harvey Phillip Spector (born December 26, 1940) is an American record producer of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Stand By Me is the title of a song first sung by Ben E. King and written by Ben E. King, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. ...


Also in 1975, David Bowie achieved his first U.S. number one hit with "Fame", co-written by Bowie, Lennon (who also contributed backing vocals and guitar) and Carlos Alomar. David Bowie (born David Robert Jones on January 8, 1947) is an English singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer whose work spans more than four decades. ... Fame was a single by David Bowie. ... Carlos Alomar is a guitarist who has played with David Bowie more than anyone else including the Serious Moonlight album and tour which featured Stevie Ray Vaughan as special guest for his Dallas, Texas show. ...


House husband

Yoko Ono was pregnant with what would be their only child, after several previous unsuccessful pregnancies, three miscarriages with John. Lennon — regretful of the limited relationship he had with first son Julian — retired from music and dedicated himself to family life. The unborn baby of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, conceived during the spring of 1968 and miscarried by Ono on November 21 of that year. ...


This was made easier in 1976 when his U.S. immigration status was finally resolved favourably, after a years-long battle with the Nixon administration that included an FBI investigation involving surveillance, wiretaps, and agents literally following Lennon around as he travelled. Lennon claimed the investigation was politically motivated. With the departure of Nixon from the White House, the administration of his successor, Gerald Ford, showed little interest in continuing the battle. The Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) was a part of the United States Department of Justice which used to handle legal and illegal immigration and naturalization. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Surveillance is the monitoring of behavior. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


When Jimmy Carter was inaugurated as President on January 20, 1977, John and Yoko were invited to attend the Inaugural Ball, signalling the end of hostilities between the U.S. government and Lennon. After this appearance, Lennon was rarely seen in public for the next 3 1/2 years, until his 1980 comeback. James Earl Carter, Jr. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the album by Ash, see 1977 (album). ...


Starting over

John and Yoko, in one of their last photo shoots, 21 November 1980
John and Yoko, in one of their last photo shoots, 21 November 1980

Lennon's retirement, which he began following the birth of his second son, Sean in 1975, lasted until 1980, when Lennon wrote an impressive amount of material during a lengthy Bermuda vacation and began thinking about a new album. For this comeback, he and Ono produced Double Fantasy, a concept album dealing with their relationship. The name came from a species of freesia Lennon saw at the Bermuda Botanical Gardens; he liked the name, and thought it was a perfect description of his marriage to Yoko. Image File history File links John Lennon promotional image This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work in the media. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Sean Taro Ono Lennon (aka Sean Ono Lennon, born October 9, 1975) is the son of musicians and peace activists John Lennon and Yoko Ono (Kyoko Chan Cox and Julian Lennon are therefore his half-siblings). ... Double Fantasy is the comeback album by John Lennon and Yoko Ono, released in 1980 initially on the newly-formed Geffen Records, and now through EMI, the distributor of all of Lennons output. ... Species See text. ...


The Lennons once again began a series of interviews and video footage to promote the album. Although Lennon would say in interviews for the album that he had not touched a guitar for five years, several of the tunes, such as "I'm Losing You," and "Watching the Wheels", had been worked on at home in the Dakota in various stages with different lyrics from 1977 onward. "(Just Like) Starting Over" began climbing the singles charts, and Lennon started thinking about a brand new world tour. Lennon also commenced work on Milk and Honey which he would leave unfinished. It was some time before Ono could bring herself to complete it. The third and final single released from John Lennon and Yoko Onos Double Fantasy album. ... (Just Like) Starting Over is a song written and performed by John Lennon for his Double Fantasy album. ... Milk And Honey is a posthumous album by John Lennon first released in 1984. ...


Towards the end of his life, Lennon expressed his displeasure with the scant credit he was given as an influence on George Harrison in the latter's autobiography I Me Mine. According to Ono, he was also unhappy that Paul McCartney's Beatles songs, such as "Yesterday", "Hey Jude" and "Let It Be" were more covered than his own contributions. In the 1980 Playboy interview[13], Lennon claimed that some of his Beatles songs were subconsciously sabotaged, and that the group put more work and attention into McCartney's songs, whereas with his, they tended to experiment. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The song Yesterday was originally recorded by The Beatles for their album Help! in 1965. ... Hey Jude is a ballad recorded by The Beatles at Trident Studios. ... Let It Be is a song written by Paul McCartney (but credited to Lennon-McCartney when released) and produced by The Beatles. ...


In this same 1980 Playboy interview, Lennon was ambivalent about his time with the Beatles and the group's legacy, not interested in talking about them any more than he would about old high school buddies. He was prompted that there was considerable speculation about whether the Beatles were now "dreaded enemies or the best of friends." He replied that they were neither, and that he hadn't seen any of The Beatles for "I don't know how much time." He also said that the last time he had seen McCartney they had watched the episode of Saturday Night Live where Lorne Michaels made his $3200 cash offer to get The Beatles to reunite on the show. The two had seriously considered going to the studio to appear on the show for a joke, but were too tired. Saturday Night Live (SNL) is a weekly late night 90-minute American comedy-variety show based in New York City which has been broadcast by NBC nearly every Saturday night since its debut on October 11, 1975. ... Lorne Michaels Lorne Michaels CM , LL.D (born November 17, 1944 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian-born American television producer and writer best known for creating and producing Saturday Night Live and producing the various film and TV projects that spun off from it. ...


Murder

Entrance to the Dakota building where Lennon lived.
Entrance to the Dakota building where Lennon lived.


At 10:50 p.m. on 8 December 1980, Mark David Chapman deliberately shot and fatally wounded John Lennon in front of Lennon's residence, the Dakota, when Lennon and Ono returned from recording Ono's single "Walking on Thin Ice" for their next album. This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Mark David Chapman (born May 10, 1955 in Fort Worth, Texas) is the man convicted of murdering former Beatle John Lennon on December 8, 1980. ... Southeast view of the Dakota from Central Park West The Dakota in the 1880s Close-up of the Dakota. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ... Walking On Thin Ice is a New Wave/dance song by Yoko Ono, released in 1981. ...


Earlier that day at around 5 p.m., Lennon and Ono left their apartment in the historic Dakota on Central Park West in New York City to go to their recording studio to supervise the transfer of some of the Double Fantasy album numbers to singles. David Geffen, their record producer and friend, said that more than 700,000 album copies had already been sold up to that time. Central Park West is an avenue in New York City. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Double Fantasy is the comeback album by John Lennon and Yoko Ono, released in 1980 initially on the newly-formed Geffen Records, and now through EMI, the distributor of all of Lennons output. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... David Lawrence Geffen (born February 21, 1943) is a record executive, film and theatrical producer, and philanthropist. ...


As they were leaving the Dakota, they were approached by several people who were seeking autographs. Among them was a man who would be later identified as Mark David Chapman. John Lennon scribbled an autograph on the Double Fantasy album cover for Chapman. ... Mark David Chapman (born May 10, 1955 in Fort Worth, Texas) is the man convicted of murdering former Beatle John Lennon on December 8, 1980. ...


The Lennons spent several hours at the studio on West 44th Street, before returning to the Dakota at about 10:50 p.m. They exited their limousine on the 72nd Street curb, even though a car could have driven through the entrance and into the courtyard. Three witnesses (Jose Perdomo, who was a doorman at the entrance; an elevator operator; and a cab driver who had just dropped off a passenger) saw Chapman standing in the shadows by the arch.


The Lennons walked past, and Ono opened the inner door and walked inside — leaving Lennon alone inside the entrance archway. Chapman called out, "Mr. Lennon!" — then dropped into a "combat stance" and shot Lennon four times with hollow point rounds from a Charter Arms .38 revolver. According to the autopsy, two shots struck Lennon in the left side of his back and two in his left shoulder. All four caused serious internal damage and bleeding. The fatal shot pierced Lennon's aorta. .357 Magnum rounds. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The largest artery in the human body, the aorta originates from the left ventricle of the heart and brings oxygenated blood to all parts of the body in the systemic circulation. ...


According to police, Lennon staggered up six steps to the room at the end of the entrance used by the concierge, said, "I'm shot," and then collapsed. After shooting Lennon, Chapman calmly sat down on the sidewalk and waited. The doorman walked to Chapman and reportedly said, "Do you know what you've just done?" Chapman replied, in a matter-of-fact tone, "I just shot John Lennon." Concierge desk at the Mount Washington Hotel. ...


The first policemen at the scene were Officers Steve Spiro and Peter Cullen, who were in a patrol car at 72nd Street and Broadway when they heard a report of shots fired at the Dakota. The officers found Chapman sitting "very calmly" on the sidewalk. They reported that Chapman had dropped the revolver after firing it, and that he had a paperback book, J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye and a cassette recorder with over 10 audio cassettes, which had 14 hours of Beatles songs on them. For the band, see The Police. ... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City, and is the oldest north-south main thoroughfare in the city, dating to the first New Amsterdam settlement. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... The Catcher in the Rye is a novel by J. D. Salinger. ... For the meaning of cassette in genetics, see cassette (genetics). ...


The second police team at the Dakota, Officers Bill Gamble and James Moran, rushed Lennon to Roosevelt Hospital. Officer Moran said they stretched Lennon out on the back seat and that the singer was "moaning." Moran asked, "Do you know who you are?" Lennon nodded slightly and tried to speak, but could only manage to make a gurgling sound. Lennon lost consciousness shortly after.


John Lennon, at the age of forty, was pronounced dead on arrival at Roosevelt Hospital at approximately 11:15 p.m. by Dr. Stephen Lynn. The cause of death was reported as hypovolemic shock, as a result of losing more than 80% of his blood volume. Dr. Elliott M. Gross — the Chief Medical Examiner — said after the autopsy that no one could have lived more than a few minutes with such injuries. The use of hollow point bullets allowed for substantial internal bleeding. In physiology and medicine, hypovolemia is a state of decreased blood volume. ... Blood volume is a term describing the amout of blood (including both red blood cells and plasma) in a persons circulatory system. ...


Yoko Ono, crying "Tell me it's not true," was taken to Roosevelt Hospital and led away in shock after she learned that her husband was dead. Geffen later issued a statement in her behalf: "John loved and prayed for the human race. Please do the same for him."


Within the first minutes after the news broadcasts announcing the shooting, people began to gather at Roosevelt Hospital and in front of the Dakota, reciting prayers, singing Lennon's songs and burning candles. Mary Magdalene in prayer. ...


The first national transmission of the news across the USA was on the fledgling Cable News Network, on which anchorwoman Kathleen Sullivan reported that Lennon had been shot and was en route to a New York hospital (his death had not yet been confirmed). CNN or Cable News Network is a cable television network that was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner & Reese Schonfeld [1]. It is a division of the Turner Broadcasting System, owned by Time Warner. ... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  Ranked 27th  - Total 54,520 sq mi (141,205 km²)  - Width 285 miles (455 km)  - Length 330 miles (530 km)  - % water 13. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ...


When Lennon was shot, the ABC television network was in the midst of airing an NFL game between the Miami Dolphins and New England Patriots on Monday Night Football. After having the news fed directly to his headset by ABC News chief Roone Arledge, legendary football announcer Howard Cosell (who had interviewed Lennon on MNF on December 9, 1974) announced the news of the murder: The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua Green, Coral Orange, Navy Blue, and White Head Coach Nick Saban Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T. D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) The... City Foxboro, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970–present) AFC... Monday Night Football (MNF) is a live television broadcast of the National Football League. ... This article is about the American news organization. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Howard William Cosell, born Howard William Cohen (March 25, 1918 – April 23, 1995) was an American sports journalist on American television. ... Monday Night Football is a television broadcast of one of the premier National Football League games of the week. ... December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


"This, we have to say it, is just a football game, no matter who wins or loses. An unspeakable tragedy, confirmed to us by ABC News in New York City. John Lennon, outside of his apartment building on the West Side of New York City, the most famous perhaps of all of The Beatles, shot twice in the back, rushed to Roosevelt Hospital, dead on arrival." This article is about the American news organization. ...


The news was broken on competing network NBC in a traditional manner: a comedy piece on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was interrupted by an anonymous announcer voicing the news bulletin over a text slide visual, then returned to the Carson sketch.. NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network based in New York Citys Rockefeller Center and is shown on basic cable in Canada. ... The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson was the full name of NBCs The Tonight Show during the years that Johnny Carson hosted from 1962 to 1992. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


When reporters intrusively questioned Paul McCartney on how he felt about his friend's death, McCartney, who had been caught off guard, muttered "Drag, isn't it?"[14] This seemingly glib response was criticised at the time, though McCartney was clearly shaken, and later stated in a Playboy interview that "I had just finished a whole day in shock and I said, 'It's a drag.' I meant drag in the heaviest sense of the word, you know: 'It's a — DRAG.' But, you know, when you look at that in print, it says, 'Yes, it's a drag.' Matter of fact." George Harrison prepared a more comprehensive press release and re-wrote the song "All Those Years Ago" for Lennon. Ringo Starr and his wife flew to New York to comfort Ono. Sir James Paul McCartney, MBE, (born June 18, 1942) is an English songwriter, musician and singer, best known as a member of The Beatles and one half of the songwriting partnership known as Lennon/McCartney. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... All Those Years Ago is a song written by George Harrison, released in the spring of 1981 as a personal tribute to the recently murdered John Lennon. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born July 7, 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is a popular English musician, singer, and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ...


On 14 December 1980, all around the world, people paused to stand alone or come together in silence, heeding a plea from Yoko Ono that they take 10 minutes to remember the former Beatle. December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ...


Lennon had a macabre sense of humour about dying in a plane crash. "We'll either go in a plane crash or we'll be popped off by some loony."[15] Several 1960s Beatles concerts in the United States and Canada did have strengthened security because of threats against the individual lives of the group members, and Starr himself claims to have performed at a Montreal concert with his cymbals positioned so as to block his view from the audience after receiving a death threat, and Harrison vetoed a proposed ticker tape parade in San Francisco in 1965 for fear of assassination. [1] In retrospect, although Lennon might have meant it as a joke and did not expect it to happen, the comment turned out to be chillingly accurate. Another comment was made in his last interview (recorded on the morning of his death), where he mentioned that he often felt that somebody was stalking him, referring to the federal agents trying to make a case for deporting him. Motto: Concordia Salus Coordinates: Country Canada Province Quebec Founded 1642 Established 1832 City Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area    - City 366. ... It is also possible that you want to know about the Cymbalum instrument. ... For other uses, see Stalking (disambiguation). ... // At present, the FBI has investigative jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes and is second to only the United States Marshal Service in terms of law enforcement jurisdiction (although the USMS by practice relegates itself to judicial duties, making the FBI the de-facto lead... Deportation is the expelling of someone from a country. ...


Lennon was cremated at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, New York, and his ashes were kept by Yoko Ono. Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ... Founded in 1903, the non-sectarian Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located on Secor Road in the hamlet of Hartsdale, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles north of New York City. ... Hartsdale is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York. ...


Chapman pleaded guilty to second degree murder and was sentenced to 20 years to life. He has been denied parole four times and remains incarcerated at Attica Correctional Facility. Yoko Ono has consistently opposed his petitions for parole, citing concerns for the safety of herself and John's children Julian and Sean. Murder is both a legal and a moral term, that are not always coincident. ... Parole can have different meanings depending on the context. ... The Attica Correctional Facility is one of the best known prisons in the United States, second possibly to Alcatraz. ...


Memorials and tributes

A much-missed figure, Lennon has been the subject of numerous memorials and tributes, principally the Strawberry Fields Memorial, constructed in Central Park across the street from the Dakota building where he lived, and where he was shot. In 2002, Liverpool also renamed its airport the Liverpool John Lennon Airport, and adopted the motto "Above us only sky". A crowd gathered outside the Dakota the night of Lennons death. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x1152, 282 KB) Summary New York, photo Sander Lamme Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1704x1152, 282 KB) Summary New York, photo Sander Lamme Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The word Strawberry Fields can have several meanings: Strawberry Fields Forever, a song by the Beatles Strawberry Field, an orphanage in Woolton, England. ... A Central Park landscape Central Park ( ) is a large public, urban park (843 acres or 3. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Flowers and a card left at the Strawberry Fields Memorial in Central Park, NYC The Strawberry Fields memorial is the name given to a garden in New Yorks Central Park, dedicated to the memory of musician John Lennon, and named after one of his songs, Strawberry Fields Forever. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is one of Europes fastest growing airports, having more than quintupled its annual passenger numbers from 875,000 in 1998 to over 4. ...


Every December 8 - the anniversary of his death - there is a memorial in front of Capitol Records on Vine Street in Hollywood, California. It includes speakers discussing Lennon, musical tributes, and group singing. A similar gathering takes place every year on his birthday, as well as on the anniversary of his death, at Strawberry Fields. December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Greetings from Hollywood Hollywood is a district of the city of Los Angeles, California, U.S.A., that extends from Vermont Avenue on the east to just beyond Laurel Canyon Boulevard above Sunset and Crescent Heights Boulevards on the west; the north to south boundary east of La Brea Avenue...


The 25th anniversary of John Lennon's death on December 8, 2005, was a particularly emotional milestone for Beatles and Lennon fans. Celebrations of John Lennon's life and music took place in London, New York City, Cleveland, and Seattle. A tribute concert was held at John Lennon Park at Havana, Cuba, with a special guest appareance by Kents, Luis Molina and X-Alfonso. December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... John Lennon Park is a public park, which is located in Cuba. ... X-Alfonso is a Cuban hip-hop and afro-rock musician, who played with Audioslave in a concert at Havana on May 7 2005 in Tribuna Anti-imperialista. From the early 1990s, he was keyboardist, singer and composer or co-composer in the Cuban group Sintesis, led by his parents...


The minor planet 4147, discovered January 12, 1983 by B. A. Skiff at the Anderson Mesa Station of the Lowell Observatory, was named in memory of John Lennon.[16] January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Lennon's humour

Each of The Beatles was known, especially during Beatlemania, for their sense of humour. Lennon's style of humour was always to combine the normal with the absurd, and then making it appear as if it was just a normal comment. After Ringo said "It's been a hard day's (work) night", he laughed, but then turned it into a song. This surrealist humour and love of wordplay was later evident in his Milliganesque writings John Lennon: In His Own Write and A Spaniard In The Works (meaning 'a spanner in the works' — a problem in the machine). The Beatles arrival at Americas JFK Airport in 1964 has proved a particularly enduring image of Beatlemania. ... Terence Alan Milligan, KBE (16 April 1918–27 February 2002), known as Spike Milligan, was a writer, artist, musician, humanitarian and comedian. ...


During live performances of "I Want to Hold Your Hand", Lennon often changed the words to "I want to hold your gland" (meaning breast/mammary gland), because no one could hear the vocals anyway, above the noise of the screaming audiences. John displayed his usual brand of humour when a reporter asked him: "Does it bother you that you can't hear what you sing during concerts?" John: "No, we don't mind. We've got the records at home." I Want to Hold Your Hand is the name of the hit 1963 Beatles song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney that led the British Invasion of the United States music charts. ... A pregnant womans breasts. ... Cross section of the breast of a human female. ...


Lennon's humour also showed up often in The Beatles' music and in his solo work. For instance, during the aborted Get Back sessions, he was recorded introducing "Dig a Pony" by shouting, "I dig a pygmy by Charles Hawtrey and the Deaf Aids, phase one in which Doris gets her oats!" The phrase was later edited to precede the first song on Let It Be, the McCartney-penned "Two of Us". Dig A Pony is a song by The Beatles, originally released on Let It Be, and later rereleased on Let It Be. ... Member of any human group whose adult males grow to less than 59 in. ... Charles Hawtrey appeared posthumously on the cover of the Smiths compilation The Very Best of The Smiths (2001). ... Let It Be is the twelfth and final album by The Beatles, released on May 8, 1970 by the bands own Apple Records label. ... Two of Us is the title of a 1969 song by The Beatles, specifically Paul McCartney. ...


On one occasion, when asked if Ringo Starr was "the best drummer in the world", Lennon replied, "He isn't even the best drummer in The Beatles", showing again how he would turn things upside down to create laughter. Perhaps regretting the remark, Lennon in later years was outspoken in his conviction of Starr's importance to the band. Richard Starkey, MBE (born July 7, 1940), known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is a popular English musician, singer, and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ...


It was Lennon, who, at the Royal Variety Show in 1963, in the presence of numerous members of the British royalty, told the audience, "Those of you in the cheaper seats can clap your hands. The rest of you, if you'll just rattle your jewellery."


Lennon's humour was apparent during the Beatles' first American press conference, immediately after they stepped off their plane in February 1964.


Reporter: "Will you please sing something for us?" Lennon: "No, we need money first."


Reporter: "What is it about your music that excites people so much?" Lennon: "If we knew, we'd form another group and be managers."


His humour, however, could go from one extreme to the other, as shown when he mocked Brian Epstein by altering the lyrics of "Baby You're A Rich Man"(Too) to "Baby you're a rich fag-Jew".[17] Brian Epstein, The Beatles manager and a force behind the groups early success. ...


Once, in an elevator of a hotel in New York where they were staying, Brian Epstein asked John what a good title would be for the autobiography he was planning to write. John answered: "How about Queer Jew?" Brian was extremely upset by his remark. Later, when John learned that the title of the book would be A Cellarful of Noise, John said to a friend: "More like A Cellarful of Boys." A Cellarful of Noise is the title of Brian Epsteins 1964 autobiography. ...


Lennon would sometimes use his humour to be extremely sarcastic, and caustic, in interviews. "We created Apple so someone wouldn't have to go down on their knees in an office — probably yours." Whilst the other Beatles laughed, he would glare to make his point, although nobody was quite sure if he was joking or not.


Lennon's partnership in songwriting with McCartney involved him — many times — in opposing McCartney's upbeat, positive outlook, with a sarcastic counter-point, as one of their songs, "Getting Better" demonstrates: Getting Better is a song attributed to John Lennon and Paul McCartney and thought to be largely composed by McCartney. ...

McCartney: I've got to admit it's getting better, it's getting better all the time.
Lennon: It can't get no worse!

The Beatles often made fun of George Martin, as they once sang "tit-tit-tit", as backing vocals instead of "dit-dit-dit" on the 1965 song "Girl" from the LP Rubber Soul. When Martin (who was upstairs in the control room and could not see them) asked, "Boys, was that dit, or... tit?" "It was dit, George", Lennon replied, as the others doubled up in silent laughter. They thought of George Martin (who was always dressed in a suit and tie) as being part of the establishment, and therefore open to jokes, but never ridicule. Girl is a song by the Beatles, written primarily by John Lennon but credited to Lennon-McCartney, off of the album Rubber Soul. ... Rubber Soul is the sixth album by English rock band The Beatles, first released in December 1965. ...


Pseudonyms

Throughout his solo career, Lennon appeared on his own albums (as well as those of other artists like Elton John) under such pseudonyms as Dr Winston O'Boogie, Mel Torment (a play on singer Mel Tormé), and The Reverend Fred Gherkin. He and Yoko (as Ada Gherkin "ate a gherkin", and other sobriquets) also travelled under such names, thus avoiding unwanted public attention. Sir Elton Hercules[1] John, CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is an English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... A pseudonym (Greek: false name) is a fictitious name used by an individual as an alternative to his or her legal name. ... Mel Tormé Melvin Howard Tormé (September 13, 1925 – June 5, 1999) was a jazz and standards singer with a light, high-tenor voice. ... Gherkin (French cornichon) is a young cucumber (Cucumis sativus), picked when 1 to 3 inches (3 to 8 cm) in length and pickled in jars or cans with vinegar (often flavoured with herbs, particularly dill; hence, ‘dill pickle’) or brine. ... A sobriquet is a nickname or a fancy name, usually a familiar name given by others as distinct from a pseudonym assumed as a disguise, but a nickname which is familiar enough such that it can be used in place of a real name without the need of explanation. ...


Literature

Numerous biographies of John Lennon have been published. Notable are Lennon: The Definitive Biography by Ray Coleman and the relentlessly hostile The Lives of John Lennon by Albert Goldman. Promotional photograph of author Ray Coleman, from the back cover of his final book, Phil Collins: The Definitive Biography. ... Cover of one of the most controversial celebrity biographies of the 20th century, Albert Goldman’s The Lives of John Lennon. ... Albert Harry Goldman (crazy jew) (April 15, 1927 – March 28, 1994) was an American professor and author. ...


John Lennon wrote three books himself: John Lennon: In His Own Write, A Spaniard in the Works, and Skywriting by Word of Mouth (the last published posthumously). A personal sketchbook with Lennon's familiar cartoons illustrating definitions of Japanese words, Ai: Japan Through John Lennon's Eyes, was published posthumously. The Beatles Anthology also contains writings, drawings, and interview transcripts by Lennon, along with the other three Beatles. The Beatles Anthology is the name of a documentary series, a series of three albums and a book, all of which focus on the history of the popular rock band The Beatles. ...

  • John Lennon, Yoko Ono, David Sheff and G. Barry Olson (1981), The Playboy interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. New York: Playboy Press/Putnam, 1981. ISBN 0872237052 - includes unpublished conversations and Lennon's song-by-song analysis of his work
  • Julia Baird (with Geoffrey Giuliano), John Lennon My Brother— 1989, Grafton Books. ISBN 0-586-20566-7
  • Fenton Bresler, The Murder of John Lennon — 1989, Mandarin, ISBN 0-7493-0357-3
  • Ray Coleman, Lennon: the definitive biography, 1992, Harper
  • E. Thomson and D. Gutman (editors), The Lennon Companion: Twenty-Five Years of the Comment — 2004, ISBN 0-333-43965-5
  • Albert Goldman, The Lives of John Lennon — 2001, Chicago, ISBN 1-55652-399-8
  • Jordi Sierra i Fabra El joven Lennon (The young Lennon); 1997, Ediciones SM. ISBN 987-578-038-3
  • Larry Kane, Lennon Revealed — 2005, Running Press, ISBN 0-7624-2364-1
  • Cynthia Lennon, John — 2005, Crown Publishers, ISBN 030733855X
  • Elizabeth Partridge, John Lennon: All I Want is the Truth — 2005, Viking Juvenile, ISBN 0-670-05954-4
  • Steven Roseta, (Just Like) Starting Over — A 2006, stage play, largely based on an unpublished John Lennon and Yoko Ono interview from 8 December 1980.
  • Jon Wiener, Come Together: John Lennon In His Time, 1985, Random House
  • Jon Wiener, Gimme Some Truth: The John Lennon FBI Files, 2000, Univ. of California
  • Rosaura Lopez En casa de John Lennon (At John Lennon's House), 2005, Hercules Ediciones , ISBN 8496314189

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Larry Kane on KYW-TV in 1995. ... December 8 is the 342nd day (343rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Rosaura Lopez Lorenzo (16 March 1932, Pontevedra, Spain – 19 September 2005, Pontevedra, Spain) was a maid of John Lennon and Yoko Ono in the Dakota apartment between 1976 and 1980. ...

Discography

Further information: John Lennon discography

The following lists detail the discography of John Lennon. ...

Trivia

This list is a summary of facts and theories relating to the life, career, and murder of John Lennon. ... This article contains trivia about The Beatles, and, whilst sometimes not directly related to them, it provides information about the people who incorporated some aspects of The Beatles into their own work. ...

Documentaries and films

The U.S. Versus John Lennon is a film that is coming out in the United States, September 2006. ...

Internal link

A John Lennon hat (or cap) was the informal name applied in the mid 1960s to a style of cap, similar to that often associated with fishermen [1], that was popularised by John Lennon (1940-80) of the Beatles rock group. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo-en. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ... NNDB, ostensibly standing for Notable Names Database, produced by Soylent Communications, is a database of biographical details of notable people. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about actors, films, television shows, video games and production crew personnel. ...

References

  1. ^ The Lennon-McCartney Songwriting Partnership www.bbc.co.uk, 11 August 2005. Retrieved on 6 November 2006
  2. ^ "John Lennon rhythm guitar role"
  3. ^ "The John Lennon I Knew" from the Telegraph, October 5, 2006
  4. ^ "John Lennon Proclaims Beatles "More Popular than Jesus"" from News of the Odd, March 4, 1966
  5. ^ "We're more popular than Jesus." from AOL Music's Infamous Rock Quotes.
  6. ^ "Paul McCartney 1984 Playboy Interview"
  7. ^ Playboy interview with David Sheff, conducted September 1980; published in January 1981 issue of Playboy; reprinted in John Lennon, Yoko Ono, David Sheff and G. Barry Olson, The Playboy interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono New York: Playboy Press/Putnam, 1981; available online at http://www.geocities.com/wireless_machine/lennon/pi.htm
  8. ^ "Lennon tapes on Beatles break-up to be broadcast" from Scotsman.com, November 18, 2005
  9. ^ "Was there a high-level MI5 agent in the British Workers Revolutionary Party?" from the World Socialist Website, March 2, 2000
  10. ^ See, for example, this PBS documentary
  11. ^ A clip of Lennon singing the song on the David Frost Show can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E9jCWQrr4w
  12. ^ " Final Resting Place of John Lennon - The Lost Weekend" from http://www.hollywoodusa.co.uk
  13. ^ conducted in September 1980 and published in Playboy in January 1981; republished in John Lennon, Yoko Ono, David Sheff and G. Barry Olson (1981), The Playboy interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. New York: Playboy Press/Putnam, 1981. ISBN 0872237052
  14. ^ "Paul McCartney on John's death" from YouTube
  15. ^ Coleman, Ray; Lennon: The Definitive Biography, 1992, Harper
  16. ^ http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/cfa/ps/special/rocknroll/0004147.html
  17. ^ Lennon: The Definitive Biography; Ray Coleman; Pan Publishing; 1984; p559


November 6 is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 55 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... People called David Frost include: Sir David Frost, the British broadcaster David Frost, the South African golfer. ... Playboy is an American adult entertainment magazine, founded in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates, which has grown into Playboy Enterprises, Inc. ... YouTube is a popular free video sharing web site which lets users upload, view, and share video clips. ...

John Lennon
Studio Albums
John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band | Imagine | Mind Games | Walls and Bridges | Rock 'n' Roll
With Yoko Ono
Unfinished Music No.1: Two Virgins | Unfinished Music No.2: Life with the Lions | Wedding Album |
Some Time in New York City | Double Fantasy | Milk and Honey
Live Albums
Live Peace in Toronto 1969 | Live in New York City |
Compilations
Shaved Fish | The John Lennon Collection | Lennon Legend: The Very Best of John Lennon |
Peace, Love & Truth | Working Class Hero: The Definitive Lennon
Posthumous Albums
Menlove Ave. | Acoustic | Wonsaponatime
Soundtracks
Imagine: John Lennon | The U.S. Versus John Lennon
Box sets
Lennon | John Lennon Anthology
Books
In His Own Write | A Spaniard in the Works
Related Articles
The Beatles | Lennon-McCartney
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33â…“ LP vinyl record for The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour album from the 1960s. ... John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band is John Lennons first official solo album, released in 1970 after having issued three experimental albums with Yoko Ono and Live Peace In Toronto 1969, a live performance in Toronto credited to The Plastic Ono Band. ... Imagine is John Lennons second solo album and is the most popular of his solo works. ... Mind Games is John Lennons fourth post-Beatles solo album, and was recorded and released in 1973. ... Walls and Bridges is an album by John Lennon released in 1974. ... Rock n Roll is a 1975 album of late 1950s and early 1960s-era rock songs covered by John Lennon. ... Yoko Ono Yoko Ono Lennon (born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese musician and artist probably best known as the widow of John Lennon of The Beatles. ... Unfinished Music No. ... Unfinished Music No. ... The Wedding Album was an experimental album released by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969. ... Some Time in New York City is John Lennons third post-Beatles album, and fifth with Yoko Ono, and was released in 1972. ... Double Fantasy is the comeback album by John Lennon and Yoko Ono, released in 1980 initially on the newly-formed Geffen Records, and now through EMI, the distributor of all of Lennons output. ... Milk And Honey is a posthumous album by John Lennon first released in 1984. ... Live Peace in Toronto 1969 is a live album recorded by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969 in Toronto, Canada, at a rock and roll revival show. ... Live In New York City was a live album recorded by John Lennon at Madison Square Garden, New York in 1972. ... Shaved Fish by John Lennon, was a greatest hits collection issued by Capitol Records. ... The John Lennon Collection is a retrospective compilation album of John Lennon music released in 1982 by Parlophone Records, through E.M.I. Records. ... Peace, Love & Truth is a compilation album of music celebrating John Lennon and Yoko Onos songs for peace, released only in Asian and Australian markets in August 2005. ... Menlove Avenue is a long road in South Liverpool, part of the Liverpool ring road. ... Acoustic is a live and acoustic album by John Lennon, released on November 2 2004. ... The album Wonsaponatime is made up of a collection of home demos, alternative studio outtakes and unreleased material recorded by John Lennon. ... The U.S. vs. ... Lennon is a four CD box set featuring many of John Lennons solo song and was released in 1990. ... John Lennon Anthology is a box set of home demos, alternative studio outtakes and unreleased material recorded by John Lennon over the course of his solo career from Give Peace A Chance in 1969 up until the 1980 sessions for Double Fantasy and Milk And Honey. ... In His Own Write is a book from 1964 by John Lennon. ... A Spaniard in the Works is a book from 1965 by John Lennon. ... The Beatles, an English musical group from Liverpool, are one of the most critically acclaimed, commercially successful popular music artists in history. ... The songwriting credit Lennon/McCartney appears on all Beatles songs that were written by John Lennon and/or Paul McCartney. ...

The Beatles
John Lennon | Paul McCartney | George Harrison | Ringo Starr
Pete Best | Stuart Sutcliffe
Management
Brian Epstein | Allen Klein | Apple Records
Production
George Martin | Geoff Emerick | Norman Smith | Phil Spector | Abbey Road Studios | Jeff Lynne
Official studio albums
Please Please Me (1963) | With the Beatles (1963) | A Hard Day's Night (1964) | Beatles for Sale (1964) | Help! (1965) | Rubber Soul (1965) | Revolver (1966)  | Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967) | Magical Mystery Tour (1967) | The Beatles (The White Album) (1968) | Yellow Submarine (1969) | Abbey Road (1969) | Let It Be (1970)
Filmography
A Hard Day's Night (1964) | Help! (1965) | Magical Mystery Tour (1967) | Yellow Submarine (1968) | Let It Be (1970)
Related articles
Line-ups | Bootlegs | Love (Cirque du Soleil) | Lennon/McCartney | Anthology | Influence | The Quarrymen | London | Beatlemania | Fifth Beatle | Paul is dead | British Invasion | Apple Corps | Northern Songs | Yoko Ono
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  Results from FactBites:
 
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On October 9, 1940 at Oxford Street Maternity Hospital, in Liverpool England, John Winston Lennon was born to Julia Lennon and Freddie Lennon.
Unfortunately, Lennon remarks on their success during an interview with Maureen Cleave in March of 1966 claiming the Beatles were, "bigger than Jesus." This statement nearly destroyed the Beatles and soon after they to decide to quit touring.
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Lennon and Ono had already given the magazine a blessing of sorts by posing nude for its first anniversary issue in late 1968.
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It documented the Beatles' career and split with painstakingly emotional (at times excruciating) detail, and served as a major, and controversial, point of exorcism for Lennon in his coming to terms with the '60s, the legacy of the Beatles and particularly his ruptured relationship with Paul McCartney.
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