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Encyclopedia > John Langdon
John Langdon


In office
April 6, 1789 – March 4, 1801
Preceded by None - One of the first U.S. Senators
Succeeded by James Sheafe

In office
April 6, 1789 – August 9, 1789
Preceded by None - First President pro tempore
Succeeded by Richard Henry Lee
In office
November 5, 1792 – December 2, 1793
Preceded by Richard Henry Lee
Succeeded by Ralph Izard

2nd, 4th, 8th & 10th Governor of New Hampshire
In office
1785 – 1786
17881789
18051809
18101812
Preceded by Meshech Weare (1785)
John Sullivan (1788)
John Taylor Gilman (1794)
Jeremiah Smith (1810)
Succeeded by John Sullivan (1786 & 1789)
Jeremiah Smith (1809)
William Plumer (1812)

Born June 26, 1741
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Died September 18, 1819
Portsmouth, New Hampshire
Political party Democratic-Republican

John Langdon (June 26, 1741September 18, 1819) was a politician from New Hampshire and one of the first two United States Senators from that state. Langdon was an early supporter of the American Revolutionary War and later served in the Continental Congress. After being in Congress for 12 years, including serving as the first President pro tempore of the Senate, Langdon became Governor of New Hampshire. He turned down a nomination for Vice Presidential candidate in 1812, and later retired until he planned his death in 1819. Today, Langdon is considered the most important New Hampshire politician in early American history. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... James Sheafe (November 16, 1755 - December 5, 1829) was a United States Representative and Senator from New Hampshire. ... A President Pro Tempore is a constitutionally recognized officer of the United States Senate who presides over the chamber in the absence of the President of the Senate. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Richard Henry Lee (January 20, 1732–June 19, 1794) was an American who served as the sixth President of the United States in Congress assembled under the Articles of Confederation, holding office from November 30, 1784 to November 22, 1785. ... Ralph Izard Ralph Izard (January 23, 1741 or 1742–May 30, 1804) was a U.S. politician. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... Meshech Weare (June 16, 1713 – January 14, 1786) was a farmer, lawyer, and revolutionary statesman from Hampton Falls, New Hampshire. ... General John Sullivan John Sullivan (b. ... John Taylor Gilman (1753 - 1828) was a farmer, shipbuilder, and statesman from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... Jeremiah Smith (November 29, 1759–September 21, 1842) was an American lawyer, jurist and politician from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... General John Sullivan John Sullivan (b. ... Jeremiah Smith (November 29, 1759–September 21, 1842) was an American lawyer, jurist and politician from Exeter, New Hampshire. ... William Plumer (June 25, 1759 – December 22, 1850) was an American lawyer and lay preacher from Epping, New Hampshire. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... The Democratic-Republican Party, founded by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison as the Republican party (not related to the present-day Republican Party) in 1792, was the dominant political party in the United States from 1800 until the 1820s, when it split into competing factions, one of which became the... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... This article is about military actions only. ... The Continental Congress was the first national government of the United States. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... See also New Hampshire Province of New Hampshire List of Colonial Governors of New Hampshire I am a doodlebug Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of New Hampshire ... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS)[1] is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ...


Langdon was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. His father was a prosperous farmer and local politician, whose family had emigrated to America before 1660 and was among the first to settle near the mouth of Piscataqua River, a settlement which became Portsmouth, one of New England's major seaports. Langdon attended the local grammar school, run by a veteran of the 1745 siege against the French at Fortress Louisbourg in Canada. After finishing his primary education, Langdon served an apprenticeship as a clerk. He and his older brother, Woodbury, rejected the opportunity to join in their father's successful agricultural pursuits, and went to sea instead, apprenticed themselves to local naval merchants. Location in Rockingham County, New Hampshire Coordinates: , Country State County Rockingham County Incorporated 1653 Government  - Mayor Steve Marchand  - City manager John P. Bohenko Area  - City  16. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,350 sq mi (24,217 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 4. ... The Piscataqua River seen from downtown Portsmouth, New Hampshire The Piscataqua River, in the northeastern United States, is a 12 mi (19 km) long tidal estuary formed by the confluence of the Salmon Falls and Cocheco rivers. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... A siege is a military blockade of a city or fortress with the intent of conquering by force or attrition, often accompanied by an assault. ... Fortress Louisbourg (in French, Forteresse de Louisbourg) is a Canadian National Historic Site and the location of a partial reconstruction of an 18th century French fortress at Louisbourg, Nova Scotia. ... If youre looking for the TV show, see The Apprentice. ...


By age 22, Langdon was captain of a cargo ship called the Andromache sailing to the West Indies. Four years later he owned his first merchantman, and would continue over time to acquire a small fleet of vessels, engaged in the triangular trade between Portsmouth, the Caribbean, and London. His older brother was even more successful in international trade, and by 1770 both young men were among Portsmouth's wealthiest citizens. Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... An example of three way trade in the North Atlantic Triangular trade is a historical term denoting trade between three ports or regions. ... Map of Central America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Sea (pronounced or ) is a tropical sea in the Western Hemisphere, part of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Gulf of Mexico. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


British control of the shipping industries greatly hurt Langdon's business, motivating him to become a vigorous and prominent supporter of the revolutionary movement in the 1770s. He served on the New Hampshire committee of correspondence and a nonimportation committee, and also attended various patriot assemblies. In 1774, he participated in the seizure and confiscation of British munitions from Fort William and Mary. For other uses, see Committee of correspondence (disambiguation). ... Fort Willam and Mary in 1705 Fort William and Mary was a colonial defensive post at New Castle, New Hampshire. ...


Langdon served as a member of the First Continental Congress from 1775 to 1776. He resigned in June 1776 to become agent for the Continental forces against the British and superintended the construction of several warships including the Raleigh, the America, and the Ranger which was captained by John Paul Jones. In 1777, he equipped an expedition against the British, participating in the Battle of Bennington and commanding Langdon's Company of Light Horse Volunteers at Saratoga and in Rhode Island. USS Raleigh was one of thirteen ships that the Continental Congress authorized for the United States Navy in 1775. ... The third USS America was the first ship of the line built for the United States Navy, but she never saw service there, being given to France after launching. ... The first USS Ranger was a sloop-of-war in the Continental Navy and received the first official salute at sea by a foreign power. ... Template:Infobox Military Person. ... Combatants Vermont, militiamen/Green Mountain Boys, Massachusetts, New Hampshire Brunswick, British Army troops, Native Americans Commanders John Stark Friedrich Baum Strength 2,000 1,250 Casualties 40 killed, 30 wounded 207 killed, 700 captured The Battle of Bennington was a battle of the American Revolutionary War, taking place on August... Langdons Company of Light Horse Volunteers was formed on July 21, 1777 at Portsmouth, New Hampshire for Gen. ... Combatants British 9th/Hill, 20th/Lynd, 21st/ Hamilton, 62nd/Ansthruter, Simon Fraser Brunswick Major Generals V. Riedesel, 1st Brigade (Brunswickers) Brig. ... Combatants British United States Commanders Robert Pigot John Sullivan Strength 7,139 10,100 Casualties at least 260 at least 211 The Battle of Rhode Island was a battle fought on August 29, 1778 when units of the Continental Army under the command of John Sullivan attempted to recapture Aquidneck...


Langdon was again a member of the Continental Congress in 1787 and became a delegate to the Constitutional Convention in 1787, serving as a member of the New Hampshire delegation. Langdon was elected to the U.S. Senate and served from March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1801. He was elected the first President pro tempore of the Senate on April 6, 1789, and also served as President pro tempore during the Second Congress. <smatest edits. ... This article discusses the history of the United States Constitution. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Langdon later served as a member of the New Hampshire legislature (1801-05), with the last two terms as Speaker; he served as Governor of New Hampshire from 1805-11, with the exception of 1809. Langdon declined the nomination to be a candidate for Vice President in 1812, and later retired. He died in his hometown of Portsmouth in 1819, and was interred at the Langdon Tomb in the North Cemetery. The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS)[1] is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ...


The town of Langdon, New Hampshire is named after John Langdon, as well as Langdon Street in Madison, Wisconsin, a town with several streets named after founding fathers. [1] Langdon is a town located in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. ... Nickname: Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates: , Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Government  - Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area  - City 219. ...


Sources

Preceded by
Meshech Weare
Governor of New Hampshire
1785–1786
Succeeded by
John Sullivan
Preceded by
John Sullivan
Governor of New Hampshire
1788–1789
Succeeded by
John Sullivan
Preceded by
John Taylor Gilman
Governor of New Hampshire
1805–1809
Succeeded by
Jeremiah Smith
Preceded by
Jeremiah Smith
Governor of New Hampshire
1810–1812
Succeeded by
William Plumer
Preceded by
None
United States Senator (Class 3) from New Hampshire
1789–1801
Served alongside: Paine Wingate, Samuel Livermore
Succeeded by
James Sheafe
Preceded by
none
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
April 6, 1789August 9, 1789
Succeeded by
Richard Henry Lee
Preceded by
Richard Henry Lee
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
November 5, 1792December 2, 1793
Succeeded by
Ralph Izard

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Langdon (1755 words)
John Langdon was born on June 26, 1741, on the Langdon family farm near the head of the Sagamore Creek in Portsmouth.
John Langdon favored a strong federal government, and when a constitutional convention was called to restructure the government, he was elected as a delegate.
John Langdon served New Hampshire as senator until March of 1801 and was influential in forming the 3 policies of the United States in its early years.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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