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Encyclopedia > John Kerry
John Forbes Kerry
John Kerry

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 1985
Serving with Ted Kennedy
Preceded by Paul Tsongas
Succeeded by incumbent (2009)

In office
1983 – 1985
Governor Michael Dukakis
Preceded by Thomas P. O'Neill III
Succeeded by Evelyn Murphy (1987)

Born December 11, 1943 (1943-12-11) (age 63)
Aurora, Colorado
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse Julia Thorne (div.)
Teresa Heinz
Alma mater Yale University
Religion Roman Catholic

John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. As the Presidential nominee of the Democratic Party, he was narrowly defeated in the 2004 presidential election by the Republican incumbent President George W. Bush. Senator Kerry is currently the Chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. He is a Vietnam Veteran, and was a spokesman for Vietnam Veterans Against the War when he returned home from service. Before entering Senate, he served as a District Attorney and Lt. Governor of Massachusetts under Michael Dukakis, also a future Democratic Presidential nominee. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (999x1546, 291 KB) Description Promotional photograph of John Kerry with the U.S. flag in the background. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... John Hancock, first Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts The Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the executive magistrate of the United States Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ... Thomas P. ONeill III leads a public relations and government affairs firm called ONeill and Associates in Boston. ... Evelyn Murphy is an American politician. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: The Gateway to the Rockies Location of Aurora in Colorado County Arapahoe, Adams, Douglas  - Mayor Ed Tauer (R) Area    - City 369. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Julia Stimson Thorne (September 16, 1944 – April 27, 2006) was a writer and the ex-wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Teresa Heinz, 2004. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Senior Senator and Junior Senator are terms commonly used in the media to describe U.S. Senators. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presidential election results map. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Vietnam veteran is a phrase used to describe someone who served in the armed forces of participating countries during the Vietnam War. ... Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) is a tax-exempt Non-profit organization and corporation, originally created to oppose the Vietnam War. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ...

Contents

Family history and childhood years

John Forbes Kerry was born in Fitzsimons Army Hospital in Aurora, Colorado, outside Denver,[1] where his father, Richard Kerry, a Second World War Army Air Corps test pilot, had been undergoing treatment for tuberculosis.[2] Kerry's family returned to their home state of Massachusetts two months after his birth. Fitzsimons aerial view, circa 1973. ... Nickname: The Gateway to the Rockies Location of Aurora in Colorado County Arapahoe, Adams, Douglas  - Mayor Ed Tauer (R) Area    - City 369. ... Official language(s) English Capital Denver Largest city Denver Area  Ranked 8th  - Total 104,185 sq mi (269,837 km²)  - Width 280 miles (451 km)  - Length 380 miles (612 km)  - % water 0. ... Nickname: Location of Denver in Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State Colorado City-County Denver (coextensive) Founded [1] November 22, 1858 Incorporated November 7, 1861 Government  - Type Strong Mayor/Weak Council  - Mayor John Hickenlooper (D) Area [1]  - City & County  154. ... Richard John Kerry (28 July 1915 – 29 July 2000) was an American airman, attorney, diplomat, and author. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Army Air Corps is a component of the British Army. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ...


Family background

John Kerry
December 11, 1943 – present
Allegiance United States Navy
Years of service 1968–1972
Rank Lieutenant, Junior grade
Unit USS Gridley
Coastal Squadron 1
Commands PCF-44, PCF-94
Battles/wars Vietnam
Awards Silver Star
Bronze Star
Purple Heart (3)

Kerry is the second child of Richard John Kerry, a Foreign Service agent and an attorney for the Bureau of United Nations Affairs, and Rosemary Forbes Kerry, a World War II nurse and member of the wealthy Forbes family. He has three siblings: two sisters, Diana (born in 1947) and Margery Peggy (born in 1941), and a brother, Cameron (born in 1950), who is a litigator in Boston. His mother was a Protestant, but his other immediate family members were reportedly observant Roman Catholics. As a child, Kerry served as an altar boy. Although the extended family enjoyed a great fortune, Kerry's parents themselves were upper-middle class; a wealthy great aunt paid for Kerry to attend elite schools in Europe and New England.[citation needed] Kerry spent his summers at the Forbes family estate in France, and there, he enjoyed a more opulent lifestyle than he had previously known in Massachusetts. While living in the U.S., Kerry spent several summers at the Forbes family's estates on Naushon Island off Cape Cod.[citation needed] Through his maternal grandmother, Margaret Tyndal Winthrop, John Kerry is distantly related to four U.S. Presidents, including George W. Bush,[3] to the first American female writer Anne Bradstreet[4] and to various royals in Europe.[5] December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USN redirects here. ... USS Gridley (DLG-21), a Leahy-class guided missile frigate, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Charles Vernon Gridley, who distinguished himself with Admiral David Farraguts force at the Battle of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... For other meanings see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... The United States Foreign Service represents the United States to the world. ... The Bureau of United Nations Affairs was a division of the United States Department of State created in 1949. ... Rosemary Forbes Kerry (October 27, 1913 - November 14, 2002), born Rosemary Isabel Forbes in Paris, was one of eleven children of James Grant Forbes of the Protestant Forbes family of China and Boston. ... This article is about the Forbes family related to US Senator John Kerry. ... Cameron Kerry (born September 6, 1950) is the younger brother and political confidant of John F. Kerry. ... A lawsuit is a civil action brought before a court in order to recover a right, obtain damages for an injury, obtain an injunction to prevent an injury, or obtain a declaratory judgment to prevent future legal disputes. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Settled 1630 Incorporated (city) 1822 Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Protestantism encompasses the forms... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... An altar server is a lay assistant to a member of the clergy during a religious service. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ... Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or... World map showing the location of Europe. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Les Essarts is the Forbes family estate at Saint-Briac, France, and the international family seat of the descendants of James Grant Forbes (b. ... The Elizabeth Islands, off the coast of Massachusetts Naushon Island, part of the Elizabeth Islands, is seven miles (11 km) long, just off (SW of) Cape Cod, and four statute miles (6 km) NW of Marthas Vineyard. ... Cape Cod (or simply the Cape) is an hook-shaped peninsula nearly coextensive with Barnstable County, Massachusetts and forming the easternmost portion of the state of Massachusetts, in the Northeastern United States. ... Margaret Tyndal Winthrop (February 23, 1880 – July 7, 1970) was the maternal grandmother of U.S. Senator John Kerry, the Presidential candidate. ... Anne Bradstreet (ca. ...


Childhood years

Kerry has said that his first memory is from when he was three years old, of holding his crying mother's hand while they walked through the broken glass and rubble of her childhood home in Saint-Briac, France. This visit came shortly after the United States had liberated Saint-Briac from the Nazis on August 14, 1944. The family estate, known as Les Essarts, had been occupied and used as a Nazi headquarters during the war. When the Germans abandoned it, they bombed Les Essarts and burned it down. Saint-Briac, also known as Saint-Briac-sur-Mer, is a commune of the Ille-et-Vilaine département, in Brittany, France. ... This page is intended to serve as a focal point for information pertinent to understanding German military activity during World War II. // Foreword When in 1933 Hitler gained power, and set on a massive program of rearmament, no one could have predicted the scope, intensity, and duration of the armed... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Les Essarts is the Forbes family estate at Saint-Briac, France, and the international family seat of the descendants of James Grant Forbes (b. ...


The sprawling estate was rebuilt in 1954. Kerry and his parents would often spend the summer holidays there. During these summers, he became good friends with his first cousin Brice Lalonde, a future Socialist and Green Party leader in France, who ran for president of France in 1981. Brice Lalonde (born February 10, 1946) is a former socialist and Green Party leader in France, who ran for President of France in 1981. ... The emblem of the French Socialist Party The Socialist Party (Parti Socialiste or PS), founded in 1969, is the main opposition party in France. ... Les verts (the Greens) is one Green Party of France. ... The President of France, known officially as the President of the Republic (Président de la République in French), is Frances elected Head of State. ...


While his father was stationed at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo, Norway, Kerry was sent to Massachusetts to attend boarding school. In 1957, he attended the Fessenden School in West Newton, a village in Newton, Massachusetts. The Fessenden School is the oldest all-boys independent junior boarding school in the country. There he met and became friends with Richard Pershing, grandson of World War I U.S. Gen. John Joseph Pershing. Massachusetts' senior senator Ted Kennedy also attended the Fessenden School, although several years prior to Kerry. A boarding school is a usually fee-paying school where some or all pupils not only study, but also live during term time, with their fellow students and possibly teachers. ... The Fessenden School is a private day and boarding school for boys founded in 1903 by Fredrick Fessenden. ... Nickname: The Garden City Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1639 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... John Joseph Black Jack Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


The following year, he enrolled at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, and graduated from there in 1962. Kerry's elderly great-aunt, Clara Winthrop, covered the costs. According to Kerry, at St. Paul's, he felt out of place because he was Catholic and liberal, while most of his fellow students were Republicans and Episcopalians. St. ... Location in Merrimack County, New Hampshire Coordinates: Country United States State New Hampshire County Merrimack County Incorporated 1733  - City Manager Thomas J. Aspell, Jr. ... Clara B. Winthrop (born 1876) was a philanthropist, art collector, and relative of John Kerry, a U.S. Senator and former presidential candidate. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... The Episcopal Churchs Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington, D.C. is often referred to as the National Cathedral. The Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the Province of the Anglican Communion in the United States and several other nations, including dioceses...


Despite having difficulty fitting in, Kerry made friends and developed his interests. He learned skills in public speaking and began developing interest in politics. In his free time, he enjoyed ice hockey and lacrosse, which he played on teams captained by classmate Robert S. Mueller III, the current director of the FBI. Kerry also played electric bass for the prep school's band The Electras, which produced an album in 1961. Only five hundred copies were made—one was auctioned on eBay in 2004 for $2,551. Public speaking is the process of speaking to a group of people in a structured, deliberate manner intended to inform, influence, or entertain the listeners. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Robert Swan Mueller III (born August 7, 1944) is the current Director of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a federal criminal investigative, intelligence agency, and the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ... Fender Precision Bass Bass Guitar is a commonly spoken phrase used to refer to the electric bass and horizontal acoustic basses, a stringed instrument similar in design to the electric guitar, but larger in size, commonly fretted and sometimes fretless and with a lower range. ... eBay headquarters in San Jose eBay North First Street satellite office campus (home to PayPal) eBay Inc. ...


In 1959, Kerry founded the John Winant Society at St. Paul's to debate the issues of the day; the Society still exists there.[6][2] In November 1960, Kerry gave his first political speech, in favor of John F. Kennedy's election to the White House. Official photo John Gilbert Winant (February 23, 1889–November 3, 1947) was an American teacher and Republican politician from Concord, New Hampshire. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


Yale University (1962–1966)

In 1962, Kerry entered Yale University, majoring in political science. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1966. Kerry played on the soccer, hockey, lacrosse and fencing teams; in addition, he took flying lessons.[2] “Yale” redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ...


In his sophomore year, Kerry became president of the Yale Political Union. His involvement with the Political Union gave him an opportunity to be involved with important issues of the day, such as the civil rights movement and Kennedy's New Frontier program. He was also inducted into the secretive Skull and Bones Society. Sophomore is used (especially in the USA) for describing a student in the second year of study (generally referring to high school or university study). ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... The term New Frontier was used by John F. Kennedy in his acceptance speech in 1960 to the Democratic National Convention at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum as the Democratic nominee and was used as a label for his administrations domestic and foreign programs. ... Emblem of the Skull and Bones society The Order of Skull and Bones, once known as The Brotherhood of Death,[1] is a secret society based at Yale University, in New Haven, Connecticut, and is one of the oldest student secret societies in the United States. ...


Under the guidance of the speaking coach and history professor Rollin Osterweis, Kerry won many debates against other college students from across the nation. In March 1965, as the Vietnam War escalated, he won the Ten Eyck prize as the best orator in the junior class for a speech that was critical of U.S. foreign policy. In the speech he said, "It is the spectre of Western imperialism that causes more fear among Africans and Asians than communism, and thus it is self-defeating."[7] Look up orator in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Over four years, Kerry maintained a 76 grade average and received an 81 average in his senior year.[8] Kerry, even then a capable speaker, was chosen to give the class oration at graduation. His speech was a broad criticism of American foreign policy, including the Vietnam War, in which he would soon participate.


In 1962, Kerry was a volunteer for Ted Kennedy's first Senatorial campaign. That summer, he dated Janet Jennings Auchincloss, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's half-sister. Auchincloss invited Kerry to visit her family's estate, Hammersmith Farm, in Rhode Island. It was there that Kerry met President John F. Kennedy for the first time. Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Janet Jennings Auchincloss Rutherfurd (1945-March 13, 1985) was an American socialite and half-sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. ... The Simpsons, see Bouvier family#Jacqueline Bouvier. ... Hammersmith Farm is located in Newport, Rhode Island and was the childhood home to Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. ... Official language(s) English Capital Providence Largest city Providence Area  Ranked 50th  - Total 1,214* [1] sq mi (3,144* km²)  - Width 37 miles (60 km)  - Length 48 miles (77 km)  - % water 32. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963), also referred to as John F. Kennedy, Kennedy, John Kennedy, Jack Kennedy, or JFK, was the thirty-fifth President of the United States. ...


According to Kerry, when he told the president he was about to enter Yale University, Kennedy grimaced, because he had gone to rival Harvard University. Kerry later recalled, "He smiled at me, laughed and said: 'Oh, don't worry about it. You know I'm a Yale man too now.'" According to Kerry "The President uttered that famous comment about how he had the best of two worlds now: a Harvard education and Yale degree", in reference to the honorary degree he had received from Yale a few months earlier. Later that day, a White House photographer snapped a photo of Kerry sailing with Kennedy and his family in Narragansett Bay. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... Narragansett Bay, shown in pink. ...


Military service (1966–1970)

Kerry joined the United States Navy Reserve during his senior year at Yale. He is quoted as saying that he decided to join the Navy after he approached his draft board for permission to study for a year in Paris, and the draft board refused.[6] In addition, several of his classmates were enlisting in the armed services. Upon graduation from Yale, Kerry entered active duty and served until 1970, eventually reaching the rank of Lieutenant. Kerry was awarded several medals during his second tour of Vietnam, including the Silver Star, Bronze Star, and three Purple Hearts. Kerry's military record has received considerable praise and criticism during his political career, especially during his unsuccessful 2004 bid for the presidency. The United States Navy Reserve is the reserve component of the United States Navy. ... USN redirects here. ... The Silver Star is the fourth highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States Armed Forces. ... The Bronze Star Medal is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration and is the fourth highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. ... For other meanings see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ... This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ...


Commission, training, and tour of duty on the USS Gridley

On February 18, 1966, Kerry enlisted in the Naval Reserve.[9] He began his active duty military service on August 19, 1966. After completing sixteen weeks of Officer Candidate School at the U.S. Naval Training Center in Newport, Rhode Island, Kerry received his officer's commission on December 16, 1966. During the 2004 election, Kerry posted his military records at his website, and permitted reporters to inspect his medical records. In 2005, Kerry released his military and medical records to the representatives of three news organizations, but has not authorized full public access to those records. [10][11] February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Officer Candidate School or Officer Cadet School (OCS) are institutions which train civilians and enlisted personnel in order for them to gain a commission as officers in the armed forces of a country. ... Newport is a city in Newport County, Rhode Island, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Providence. ... December 16 is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Kerry's first tour of duty was as an ensign on the guided missile frigate USS Gridley in 1968. The executive officer of the Gridley described the deployment as: "We deployed from San Diego to the Vietnam theatre in early 1968 after only a six-month turnaround, and spent most of a four month deployment on rescue station in the Gulf of Tonkin, standing by to pick up downed aviators." Ensign is a junior rank of commissioned officer in the militaries of some countries, normally in the infantry or navy. ... A guided missile is a military rocket that can be directed in flight to change its flight path. ... For the bird, see Frigatebird. ... USS Gridley (DLG-21), a Leahy-class guided missile frigate, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Charles Vernon Gridley, who distinguished himself with Admiral David Farraguts force at the Battle of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. ... The Gulf of Tonkin is located to the south of China. ...


During his tour on the USS Gridley, Kerry requested duty in Vietnam, listing as his first preference a position as the commander of a Fast Patrol Craft (PCF), also known as a "Swift boat."[12] These 50-foot boats have aluminum hulls and have little or no armor, but are heavily armed and rely on speed. "I didn't really want to get involved in the war," Kerry said in a book of Vietnam reminiscences published in 1986. "When I signed up for the swift boats, they had very little to do with the war. They were engaged in coastal patrolling and that's what I thought I was going to be doing."[13] However, his second choice of billet was on a river patrol boat, or "PBR", which at the time was serving a more dangerous duty on the rivers of Vietnam.[12] USS Gridley (DLG-21), a Leahy-class guided missile frigate, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Charles Vernon Gridley, who distinguished himself with Admiral David Farraguts force at the Battle of Mobile Bay on 5 August 1864. ... Swift Boat PCF71 in Vietnam, showing forward twin . ... Aluminum is a soft and lightweight metal with a dull silvery appearance, due to a thin layer of oxidation that forms quickly when it is exposed to air. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... Patrol Boat Patrol Boat, Rigid (sometimes River or Riverine), or PBR, is the US Navy designation for a type of rigid-hulled patrol boat used in the Vietnam War from March 1966 until the end of 1970. ...


On June 16, 1968, Kerry was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, junior grade. On June 20, 1968, he left the Gridley for Swift boat training at the Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... LTJG insignia. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of Coronado Coronado is a city in San Diego County, California, United States. ...


Swift boat duty

On November 17, 1968, Kerry reported for duty at Coastal Squadron 1 in Cam Ranh Bay in South Vietnam. In his role as an officer in charge of Swift boats, Kerry led five-man crews on a number of patrols into enemy-controlled areas. His first command was Swift boat PCF-44, from December 6, 1968 to January 21, 1969, when the crew was disbanded. They were based at Coastal Division 13 at Cat Lo from December 13, 1968 to January 6, 1969. Otherwise, they were stationed at Coastal Division 11 at An Thoi. On January 30, 1969, Kerry took charge of PCF-94 and its crew, which he led until he departed An Thoi on March 26, 1969, and subsequently the crew was disbanded.[14] 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Cam Ranh Bay is a deep-water seaport in Vietnam in the province of Khanh Hoa. ... Anthem Thanh niên Hành Khúc (Call to the Citizens) Capital Saigon Language(s) Vietnamese Government Republic Last President¹ Duong Van Minh Last Prime minister Vu Van Mau Historical era Cold War  - Regime change June 14, 1955  - Dissolution April 30, 1975 Area  - 1973 173,809 km² 67,108... December 6 is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... December 13 is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


On January 22, 1969, Kerry and several other officers had a meeting in Saigon with Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, the commander of U.S. Naval forces in Vietnam, and U.S. Army General Creighton Abrams, the overall commander of U.S. forces in Vietnam. Kerry and the other officers reported that the "free-fire zone" policy was alienating the Vietnamese and that the Swift boats' actions were not accomplishing their ostensible goal of interdicting Viet Cong supply lines. According to his biographer, Douglas Brinkley, Kerry and the other visiting officers felt their concerns were dismissed with what amounted to a pep talk ("Tour of Duty," pp. 254–261). January 22 is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnamese: Thành Chí Minh) is the largest city in Vietnam, located near the delta of the Mekong River. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Elmo R. Zumwalt Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Creighton Williams Abrams Jr. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Douglas Brinkley (born December 14, 1960) is a prolific author and a professor of history at Tulane University, where he also serves as director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization. ...


Military honors

During the night of December 2, 1968 and early morning of December 3, 1968, Kerry was in charge of a small boat operating near a peninsula north of Cam Ranh Bay together with a Swift boat (PCF-60). According to Kerry and the two crewmen who accompanied him that night, Patrick Runyon and William Zaladonis, they surprised a group of men unloading sampans at a river crossing, who began running and failed to obey an order to stop. As the men fled, Kerry and his crew opened fire on the sampans and destroyed them, then rapidly left. During this encounter, Kerry received a minor wound in the left arm above the elbow. It was for this injury that Kerry received his first Purple Heart.[15] is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... Cam Ranh Bay is a deep-water seaport in Vietnam in the province of Khanh Hoa. ... A sampan carrying passengers to the outlying islands off the Sai Kung Peninsula in Hong Kong Sampan on the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), China A sampan (舢舨) is a relatively flat bottomed Chinese wooden boat from twelve to fifteen feet long. ... For other meanings see Purple Heart (disambiguation). ...


Kerry received his second Purple Heart for a wound received in action on the Bo De River on February 20, 1969. The plan had been for the Swift boats to be accompanied by support helicopters. On the way up the Bo De, however, the helicopters were attacked. They returned to their base to refuel and were unable to return to the mission for several hours. is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


As the Swift boats reached the Cua Lon River, Kerry's boat was hit by a RPG round, and a piece of shrapnel hit Kerry's left leg, wounding him. Thereafter, they had no more trouble, and reached the Gulf of Thailand safely. Kerry still has shrapnel in his left thigh because the doctors tending to him decided to remove the damaged tissue and close the wound with sutures rather than make a wide opening to remove the shrapnel.[16] Kerry received his second Purple Heart for this injury, but like several others wounded earlier that day, he did not lose any time off from duty.[17][18] An RPG-7 captured by the US Army RPG, or Rocket propelled grenade is a loose term describing hand-held, shoulder-launched anti-tank weapons capable of firing an unguided rocket equipped with an explosive warhead. ... It has been suggested that Fragmentation (weaponry) be merged into this article or section. ... The Gulf of Thailand is a gulf located in the South China Sea (Pacific Ocean), surrounded by the countries Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam. ... It has been suggested that suture material be merged into this article or section. ...


Eight days later, on February 28, 1969, came the events for which Kerry was awarded his Silver Star. On this occasion, Kerry was in tactical command of his Swift boat and two others. Their mission included bringing a demolition team and dozens of South Vietnamese soldiers to destroy enemy sampans, structures and bunkers. Running into an ambush, Kerry "directed the boats to turn to the beach and charge the Viet Cong positions" and he "expertly directed" his boat's fire and coordinated the deployment of the South Vietnamese troops, according to the original medal citation (signed by Admiral Zumwalt). Going a short distance farther, Kerry's boat was the target of an RPG round; as the boat beached at the site, a VC with a rocket launcher jumped and ran from a spider hole. While the boat's gunner opened fire, wounding the VC on the leg, and while the other boats approached and offered cover fire, Kerry jumped from the boat and chased the VC and killed him, capturing a loaded rocket launcher.[19][20][21] February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... A sampan carrying passengers to the outlying islands off the Sai Kung Peninsula in Hong Kong Sampan on the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), China A sampan (舢舨) is a relatively flat bottomed Chinese wooden boat from twelve to fifteen feet long. ...


Kerry's commanding officer, Lieutenant Commander George Elliott, joked to Douglas Brinkley in 2003 that he didn't know whether to court-martial Kerry for beaching the boat without orders or give him a medal for saving the crew. Elliott recommended Kerry for the Silver Star, and Zumwalt flew into An Thoi to personally award medals to Kerry and the rest of the sailors involved in the mission. The Navy's account of Kerry's actions is presented in the original medal citation signed by Zumwalt. The engagement was documented in an after-action report, a press release written on March 1, 1969, and a historical summary dated March 17, 1969.[22] In the Royal Navy, United States Navy and United States Coast Guard, a lieutenant commander (lieutenant-commander or Lt Cdr in the RN) is a commissioned officer superior to a lieutenant and inferior to a commander. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... is the 76th day of the year (77th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


On March 13, 1969, five Swift boats were returning to base together on the Bay Hap river from their missions that day, after a firefight earlier in the day (during which time Kerry received a slight shrapnel wound in the buttocks from blowing up a rice bunker), and debarking some but not all of the passengers at a small village. They approached a fishing weir (a series of poles across the river for hanging nets), so that one group of boats went around left, hugging the shore, and a group with Kerry's 94 boat went around right along the shoreline. A mine was detonated directly beneath the lead boat, PCF-3, as it crossed the weir to the left, lifting PCF-3 completely into the air.[23] is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...


James Rassmann, a Green Beret advisor who was aboard PCF-94, was knocked overboard when, according to witnesses and the documentation of the event, a mine or rocket exploded close to the boat. According to the documentation for the event, Kerry's arm was injured when he was thrown against a bulkhead during the explosion. PCF 94 returned to the scene and Kerry rescued Rassmann from the water. Kerry received the Bronze Star for his actions during this incident; he also received his third Purple Heart.[24] James Rassmann (born ~1948) is a resident of the U.S. state of Oregon who served as a U.S. Army Green Beret in the Vietnam War and was rescued from the Bay Hap River on March 13, 1969 by future presidential candidate John Kerry. ... The United States Army Special Forces—or simply Special Forces (capitalized)—is an elite Special Operations Force of the United States Army trained for unconventional warfare and special operations. ...


After the crew of PCF-3 had been rescued, and the most seriously wounded sailors evacuated by two of the PCFs, PCF 94 and another boat remained behind and helped salvage the stricken boat together with a damage-control party that had been immediately dispatched to the scene.


Return from Vietnam

After Kerry's third qualifying wound, he was entitled per Navy regulations to re-assignment away from combat duties. Navy records show that Kerry's preferred choice for re-assignment was as an aide in Boston, New York or Washington, D.C.[25] NY redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - D.C. Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2...


On March 26, 1969, after a final patrol the night before, Kerry was transferred to Cam Ranh Bay to await his orders. He was there for five or six days and left Vietnam in early April. On April 11, 1969, he reported to the Brooklyn-based Atlantic Military Sea Transportation Service, where he would remain on active duty for the following year as a personal aide to an officer, Rear Admiral Walter Schlech. On January 1, 1970 Kerry was temporarily promoted to full Lieutenant.[26] Kerry had agreed to an extension of his active duty obligation from December 1969 to August 1970 in order to perform Swift Boat duty [27][28] , but in January, 1970, he requested early discharge in order to run for Congress the following fall. He was discharged from active duty on March 1, 1970. March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is a United States Navy (USN) organisation that controls most of the replenishment and military transport ships of the Navy. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday. ...


John Kerry was on active duty in the U.S. Navy for three years and eight months, from August 1966 until March 1970. He continued to serve in the Navy Reserves until February 1972. Kerry lost five friends in the war, including Yale classmate Richard Pershing, who was killed in action on February 17, 1968. Temporary grave of an American machine-gunner during the Battle of Normandy. ... February 17 is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ...


Controversy over military service and awards

As the presidential campaign of 2004 developed, approximately 200 Vietnam veterans formed the group Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), subsequently renamed Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, which held press conferences, ran ads, and endorsed a book questioning Kerry's service record and his military awards. Defenders of John Kerry's war record, including all but one of his surviving former crewmates, asserted that several organizers of SBVT had close ties to the Bush presidential campaign and that SBVT accusations were politically motivated and false. Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign. ... Swift Vets and POWs for Truth, formerly known as the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth (SBVT), is an organization of American Swift boat veterans and former prisoners of war of the Vietnam War, formed during the 2004 presidential election campaign for the purpose of opposing John Kerrys candidacy for...

See: John Kerry military service controversy

The John Kerry military service controversy describes a political issue that gained widespread public attention during John Kerrys candidacy in the 2004 U.S. presidential campaign. ...

Anti-war activism (1970–1971)

Kerry co-authored the book The New Soldier with the VVAW.
Kerry co-authored the book The New Soldier with the VVAW.

After returning to the United States, Kerry joined the Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW). Then numbering about 20,000,[29] VVAW was considered by some (including the administration of President Richard Nixon) to be an effective, if controversial, component of the antiwar movement.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (763x1047, 167 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (763x1047, 167 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... VVAW Produced the book The New Soldier The New Soldier was a book published in 1971 by Vietnam Veterans Against the War. ... Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) is a tax-exempt Non-profit organization and corporation, originally created to oppose the Vietnam War. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ...


On April 22, 1971, Kerry became the first Vietnam veteran to testify before Congress about the war, when he appeared before a Senate committee hearing on proposals relating to ending the war. Wearing green fatigues and service ribbons, he spoke for nearly two hours with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in what has been named the Fulbright Hearing, after the Chairman of the proceedings, Senator J.W. Fulbright. Kerry began with a prepared speech, in which he presented the conclusions of the Winter Soldier Investigation, and then went on to address larger policy issues.[citation needed] is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... This page describes uniform in the sense of clothing. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Fulbright Hearings were U.S. Senate hearings in 1971 relating to the Vietnam War. ... The Winter Soldier Investigation was a media event intended to publicize war crimes and atrocities by the United States Armed Forces and their allies in the Vietnam War, while showing their direct relationship to military leadership and the foreign and anti-Communist policies of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon Presidential...


The day after this testimony, Kerry participated in a demonstration with 800 other veterans in which he and other veterans threw their medals and ribbons over a fence at the front steps of the United States Capitol building to dramatize their opposition to the war. Jack Smith, a Marine, read a statement explaining why the veterans were returning their military awards to the government. For more than two hours, angry veterans tossed their medals, ribbons, hats, jackets, and military papers over the fence. Each veteran gave his or her name, hometown, branch of service and a statement. As Kerry threw his decorations over the fence, his statement was: "I'm not doing this for any violent reasons, but for peace and justice, and to try and make this country wake up once and for all." [30] The documentary film Sir! No Sir! includes archival footage of Kerry at the demonstration: he is one of several young men seen throwing things over the fence. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... Sir! No Sir! is a Displaced Films/BBC documentary film about the anti-war movement within the ranks of the United States Military during the Vietnam War. ...


Media appearances

Kerry's anti-war activities were satirized by Garry Trudeau in his comic strip Doonesbury on October 22, 1971.

Because Kerry was a decorated veteran who took a stand against the government's official position, he was frequently interviewed by broadcast and print media. He was able to use these occasions to bring the themes of his Senate testimony to a wider audience. Image File history File links Kerrydoonesbury. ... Image File history File links Kerrydoonesbury. ... Garry Trudeau Garretson Beekman Trudeau (born July 21, 1948, in New York City) is an American cartoonist, best known for the Doonesbury comic strip. ... Doonesbury is a comic strip by Garry Trudeau, popular in the United States and other parts of the world. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


For example, Kerry appeared more than once on The Dick Cavett Show on ABC television. On one Cavett program (June 30, 1971), in debating John O'Neill, Kerry argued that some of the policies instituted by the U.S. military leaders in Vietnam, such as free-fire zones and burning noncombatants' houses, were contrary to the laws of war. In the Washington Star newspaper (June 6, 1971), he recounted how he and other Swift boat officers had become disillusioned by the contrast between what the leaders told them and what they saw: "That's when I realized I could never remain silent about the realities of the war in Vietnam." The current version of this article or section is written in an informal style and with a personally invested tone. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... John Ellis ONeill (born 1946) is a lawyer and a spokesman for Swift Vets and POWs for Truth. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The two parts of the laws of war (or Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC)): Law concerning acceptable practices while engaged in war, like the Geneva Conventions, is called jus in bello; while law concerning allowable justifications for armed force is called jus ad bellum. ... The Washington Star, previously known as the Washington Star-News and the Washington Evening Star, was a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C. between 1852 and 1982. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


On NBC's Meet The Press in 1971, Kerry was asked whether he had personally committed atrocities in Vietnam. He responded: The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ...

"There are all kinds of atrocities, and I would have to say that, yes, yes, I committed the same kind of atrocities as thousands of other soldiers have committed in that I took part in shootings in free fire zones. I conducted harassment and interdiction fire. I used 50 calibre machine guns, which we were granted and ordered to use, which were our only weapon against people. I took part in search and destroy missions, in the burning of villages. All of this is contrary to the laws of warfare, all of this is contrary to the Geneva Conventions and all of this is ordered as a matter of written established policy by the government of the United States from the top down. And I believe that the men who designed these, the men who designed the free fire zone, the men who ordered us, the men who signed off the air raid strike areas, I think these men, by the letter of the law, the same letter of the law that tried Lieutenant Calley, are war criminals."
Kerry with former Beatle John Lennon during a protest rally at New York City's Bryant Park on May 12, 1972.

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Kerry_Lennon. ... Image File history File links Kerry_Lennon. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Bryant Park, August 2003 Bryant Park is a 9. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Operation POW

Kerry's prominence also made him a frequent leader and spokesman at antiwar events around the country in 1971. One of particular note was Operation POW, organized by the VVAW in Massachusetts. The protest got its name from the group's concern that Americans were prisoners of the Vietnam War, as well as to honor American POWs held captive by North Vietnam. The Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN), or less commonly, Vietnamese Democratic Republic (Vietnamese: Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa), also known as North Vietnam, was proclaimed by Ho Chi Minh in Hanoi, September 2nd1945 and was recognized by the Peoples Republic of China and the...


The event sought to tie antiwar activism to patriotic themes. Over the Memorial Day weekend, veterans and other participants marched from Concord to a rally on Boston Common. The plan was to invoke the spirit of the American Revolution and Paul Revere by spending successive nights at the sites of the Battle of Lexington and Concord and the Battle of Bunker Hill, culminating in a Memorial Day rally with a public reading of the Declaration of Independence. Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday that is observed on the last Monday of May (observed this year on 2007-05-28). ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1635 Incorporated 1635 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  25. ... Image:Boston common Boston Massachusetts USA.jpg Boston Common in 2005, with the State House looming in the background 1890 Map of Boston Common and the adjacent Public Garden View of the Water Celebration, on Boston Common, October 25th 1848 Boston Common Engraving For the television series, see Boston Common... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... For the song by the Beastie Boys, see Paul Revere (song). ... The Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War and was described as the shot heard round the world in Emersons Concord Hymn. ... Combatants Kingdom of Great Britain Province of Massachusetts Bay Commanders British Army: William Howe, Robert Pigot, Henry Clinton, Royal Navy: Samuel Graves Israel Putnam, William Prescott, Joseph Warren†, Seth Pomeroy, (Both Warren and Pomeroy declined command) Strength 2,600 1,500 Casualties 226 dead, 828 wounded 140 dead, 271 wounded... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...


The second night of the march, May 29, 1971, was the occasion for Kerry's only arrest, when the participants tried to camp on the village green in Lexington. At 2:30 a.m. on May 30, 1971, local and state police awoke and arrested 441 demonstrators, including Kerry, for trespassing. All were given the Miranda Warning and were hauled away on school buses to spend the night at the Lexington Public Works Garage. Kerry and the other protesters later paid a $5 fine, and were released. The mass arrests caused a community backlash and ended up giving positive coverage to the VVAW.[citation needed] is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1642 Incorporated 1713 Government  - Type Representative town meeting Area  - Town  16. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... The Miranda warning is a police warning that is given to criminal suspects in police custody or in a custodial situation in the United States before they are asked questions relating to the commission of a crime. ...


Despite his role in Operation POW and other VVAW events, Kerry eventually quit the organization over leadership differences. Kerry has been criticized regarding VVAW—see John Kerry VVAW controversy for more details. John Kerry, the Democratic candidate for President of the United States in 2004, first came to national prominence through his leadership role in Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW). ...


Early career (1972–1985)

1972 Campaign for Congress

In February 1972, after Kerry previously passed on an opportunity to run in another district, his wife, Julia bought a house in Worcester. Residence there would have required Kerry to run for Congress against an incumbent Democrat, Harold D. Donohue. Instead however, the couple rented an apartment in Lowell. The incumbent in that district, F. Bradford Morse, was a Republican who was thought to be retiring. Julia Stimson Thorne (September 16, 1944 – April 27, 2006) was a writer and the ex-wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Worcester County Settled 1673 Incorporated 1684 Government  - Type Council-manager also known as Plan E  - City Manager Michael V. OBrien  - Mayor Konstantina B. Lukes  - City Council Dennis L. Irish Michael C. Perotto Joseph M. Petty Gary Rosen Kathleen... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Harold Daniel Donohue (1901-1984) was an American politician. ... Nickname: Motto: Art is the Handmaid of Human Good Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1653 Incorporated 1826 A city 1836 Government  - Type Manager-City council  - Mayor William F. Martin, Jr. ... Frank Bradford Morse was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. ...


Counting Kerry, the Democratic primary race in 1972 had 10 candidates. One of these was State Representative Anthony R. DiFruscia of Lawrence. Both Kerry's and DiFuscia's campaign HQ's were in the same building. On the eve of the September primary, Kerry's younger brother Cameron and campaign field director Thomas J. Vallely, both then 22 years old, were found by police in the basement of this building, where the telephone lines were located. They were arrested and charged with "breaking and entering with the intent to commit grand larceny", but the case was dismissed about a year later. At the time of the incident, DiFruscia alleged that they were trying to disrupt his get-out-the vote efforts. Vallely and Cameron Kerry maintained that they were only checking their own telephone lines because they had received an anonymous call warning that the Kerry lines would be cut.[31]   Settled: 1655 â€“ Incorporated: 1847 Zip Code(s): 01840 â€“ Area Code(s): 351 / 978 Official website: http://www. ... Breaking and entering is defined as the crime of illegally entering a residence or other enclosed property using any amount of force (even pushing open an unlocked door). ... Larceny is a crime involving stealing. ...


Although Kerry's campaign was hurt by the election-day report of the arrest, he still won the primary by a comfortable margin over state Representative Paul J. Sheehy. DiFruscia placed third. Kerry lost in Lawrence and Lowell, his chief opponents' bases, but placed first in 18 of the district's 22 towns.


In the general election, Kerry was initially favored to defeat the Republican candidate, former state Representative Paul W. Cronin, and an independent, Roger P. Durkin. A major obstacle, however, was the district's leading newspaper, the conservative Sun. The paper editorialized against him. It also ran critical news stories about his out-of-state contributions and his "carpetbagging", because he had moved into the district only in April. Subsequently released "Watergate" Oval Office tape recordings of the Nixon White House showed that defeating Kerry's candidacy had attracted the personal attention of President Nixon.[32] Paul William Cronin (March 14, 1938 - April 5, 1997) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... The Sun is a daily newspaper based in Lowell, Massachusetts, serving towns in Massachusetts and New Hampshire in the Greater Lowell area and beyond. ... In United States history, carpetbaggers were Northerners who moved to the South with Freedmen (freed slaves), and Scalawags (Southern whites) in the Republican Party, which in turn controlled ex-Confederate states for varying periods between 1867 and 1877. ...


The final blow came when, four days before the election, Durkin withdrew in favor of Cronin. Cronin won the election, becoming the only Republican to be elected to Congress that November in a district carried by Democratic Presidential nominee George McGovern. The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. ... George McGovern on May 8, 1972 cover of Time Magazine George Stanley McGovern, Ph. ...


Law school and early political career (1972–1985)

After Kerry's 1972 defeat, he and his wife bought a house in Lowell. He spent some time working as a fundraiser for the Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE), an international humanitarian organization. He decided that the best way for him to continue in public life was to study law[citation needed]. In September 1973, he entered Boston College Law School at Newton, Massachusetts. In July 1974, while attending law school, Kerry was named executive director of Mass Action, a Massachusetts advocacy association. CARE (the full form Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere is almost never used) is one of the largest private international humanitarian organizations in the world, with programmes in over 72 countries. ... Boston College Law School, known colloquially as BC Law, is one of the professional graduate schools of Boston College. ... Nickname: The Garden City Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1639 Incorporated 1688 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor David B. Cohen (Dem) Area  - City  18. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ...


He received his Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree in 1976. While in law school he had been a student prosecutor in the office of the District Attorney of Middlesex County, John J. Droney. After passing the bar exam and being admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1976, he went to work in that office as a full-time prosecutor. Doctor of Law, Doctor of Jurisprudence, or Juris Doctor (abbreviated J.D. or JD, from the Latin, Teacher of Law) is a professional degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... A district attorney is, in some U.S. jurisdictions, the title of the local public official who represents the government in the prosecution of criminals. ... Middlesex County is a county located in the commonwealth of Massachusetts. ...


In January 1977, Droney promoted him to First Assistant District Attorney. In that position, Kerry had dual roles. First, he tried cases, winning convictions in a high-profile rape case and a murder. Second, he played a role in administering the office of the district attorney by initiating the creation of special white-collar and organized crime units, creating programs to address the problems of rape and other crime victims and of witnesses, and managing trial calendars to reflect case priorities. It was in this role in 1978 that Kerry announced an investigation into possible criminal charges against then Senator Edward Brooke, regarding "misstatements" in his first divorce trial.[33] Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in...


In 1979, Kerry resigned from the District Attorney's office to set up a private law firm with another former prosecutor. And, although his private law practice was a success, Kerry was still interested in public office. He re-entered electoral politics by running for Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts and won a narrow victory in the 1982 Democratic primary. The ticket, with Michael Dukakis as the gubernatorial candidate, won the general election without difficulty. A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... Michael Stanley Dukakis (born November 3, 1933) is an American Democratic politician, former Governor of Massachusetts, and the Democratic presidential nominee in 1988. ...


The position of Lieutenant Governor carried few inherent responsibilities. Dukakis, however, delegated additional matters to Kerry. In particular, Kerry's interest in environmental protection led him to become heavily involved in the issue of acid rain. His work contributed to a National Governors Association resolution in 1984 that was a precursor to the 1990 amendments to the federal Clean Air Act. The term acid rain also known as acid precipitation is commonly used to mean the deposition of acidic components in rain, snow, dew, or dry particles. ... The National Governors Association (NGA) is an organization of the governors of the fifty U.S. states and five U.S. territories (American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


During his campaign, Kerry had argued that nuclear evacuation planning was "a sham intended to deceive Americans into believing they could survive a nuclear war". Once in office, he drafted an Executive Order condemning such planning, which Dukakis signed despite having lost the presidential election.[citation needed] An executive order is an edict issued by a member of the executive branch of a government, usually the head of that branch. ...


Election to the Senate

The junior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, Paul Tsongas, announced in 1984 that he would be stepping down for health reasons. Kerry decided to run for the seat. As in his 1982 race for Lieutenant Governor, he did not receive the endorsement of the party regulars at the state Democratic convention. Again as in 1982, however, he prevailed in a close primary. In his campaign he promised to mix liberalism with tight budget controls. As the Democratic candidate he was elected to the Senate despite a nationwide landslide for the re-election of Republican president Ronald Reagan, whom Massachusetts voted for by a narrow margin. In his acceptance speech, Kerry asserted that his win meant that the people of Massachusetts "emphatically reject the politics of selfishness and the notion that women must be treated as second-class citizens." Kerry was sworn in as a U.S. Senator in January 1985. Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


Service in the U.S. Senate (1985–present)

An earlier Senate portrait of Kerry
An earlier Senate portrait of Kerry

See also: Legislation sponsored by John Kerry Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1875, 1418 KB) http://sbc. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1500x1875, 1418 KB) http://sbc. ... John Kerry has sponsored or cosponsored hundreds of bills during his time as a Senator. ...


Iran-Contra hearings

On April 18, 1985, a few months after taking his Senate seat, Kerry and Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa traveled to Nicaragua and met the country's president, Daniel Ortega. Though Ortega was democratically elected, the trip was criticized because Ortega and his leftist Sandinista government had strong ties to Cuba and the USSR. The Sandinista government was opposed by the right-wing CIA-backed rebels known as the Contras. While in Nicaragua, Kerry and Harkin talked to people on both sides of the conflict. Through the senators, Ortega offered a cease-fire agreement in exchange for the US dropping support of the Contras. The offer was denounced by the Reagan administration as a "propaganda initiative" designed to influence a House vote on a $14 million Contra aid package, but Kerry said "I am willing … to take the risk in the effort to put to test the good faith of the Sandinistas." The House voted down the Contra aid, but Ortega flew to Moscow to accept a $200 million loan the next day, which in part prompted the House to pass a larger $27 million aid package six weeks later.[34] The Kerry Committee report were hearings chaired by Senator John Kerry which found the U.S. State Department had paid drug traffickers. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is a Democratic Senator from Iowa, serving in his fourth senate term. ... Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... José Daniel Ortega Saavedra (born 11 November 1945) is the current President of Nicaragua. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms which refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially in the American sense of the word), or with opposition... Sandinista! is also the name of a popular music album by The Clash. ... In politics, right-wing, the political right, or simply the right, are terms which refer, with no particular precision, to the segment of the political spectrum in opposition to left-wing politics. ... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... The Contras (from the Spanish term La Contra, short for movement of the contrarrevolucionarios) were the armed opponents of Nicaraguas Sandinista Junta of National Reconstruction following the July 1979 overthrow of Anastasio Somoza Debayle (which ended the Somoza dynasty), and continuing throughout the following decade. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 - June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Soviet Propaganda Poster during the World War II. The text reads Red Army Fighter, SAVE US! Chinese propaganda poster from during the Cultural Revolution. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Development aid. ... Position of Moscow in Europe Coordinates: , Country District Subdivision Russia Central Federal District Federal City Government  - Mayor Yuriy Luzhkov Area  - City 1,081 km²  (417. ...


In April 1986, Kerry and Senator Christopher Dodd, a Democrat from Connecticut, proposed that hearings be conducted by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee regarding charges of Contra involvement in cocaine and marijuana trafficking. Sen. Richard G. Lugar of Indiana, the Republican chairman of the committee, agreed to conduct the hearings. Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... Look up contra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cocaine is a crystalline tropane alkaloid that is obtained from the leaves of the coca plant. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ... Retail selling Street selling is the bottom of the chain and can be accomplished through purchasing from prostitutes, through cloaked retail stores or refuse houses for users in the act located in red-light districts which often also deal in paraphernalia, dealers marketing merriment at night clubs and other events... Richard Green Dick Lugar (born April 4, 1932) is the senior United States Republican Senator from Indiana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ...


Meanwhile, Kerry's staff began their own investigations, and on October 14 issued a report that exposed illegal activities on the part of Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North, who had set up a private network involving the National Security Council and the CIA to deliver military equipment to right-wing Nicaraguan rebels (Contras). In effect, North and certain members of the President's administration were accused by Kerry's report of illegally funding and supplying armed militants without the authorization of Congress. Kerry's staff investigation, based on a year long inquiry and interviews with 50 unnamed sources, is said to raise "serious questions about whether the United States has abided by the law in its handling of the contras over the past three years."[35] In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... Oliver Laurence North (born October 7, 1943) is most well known for his involvement in the Iran-Contra Affair. ... The National Security Council (NSC) of the United States is the principal forum used by the President of the United States for considering national security and foreign policy matters with his senior national security advisors and cabinet officials. ...


The Kerry Committee report found that "the Contra drug links included … payments to drug traffickers by the U.S. State Department of funds authorized by the Congress for humanitarian assistance to the Contras, in some cases after the traffickers had been indicted by federal law enforcement agencies on drug charges, in others while traffickers were under active investigation by these same agencies."[36] The US State Department paid over $806,000 to known drug traffickers to carry humanitarian assistance to the Contras.[37] Kerry's findings provoked little reaction in the media and official Washington.[38] The Kerry Committee report were hearings chaired by Senator John Kerry which found the U.S. State Department had paid drug traffickers. ...


The Kerry report was a precursor to the Iran-Contra affair. On May 4, 1989, North was convicted of charges relating to the Iran/Contra controversy, including three felonies. On September 16, 1991, however, North's convictions were overturned on appeal.[39] The Iran-Contra Affair (also Irangate), was a political scandal occurring in 1987 as a result of earlier events during the Reagan administration in which members of the executive branch sold weapons to Iran, an avowed enemy, and illegally used the profits to continue funding rebels, the Contras, in Nicaragua. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... // 1400 - Owain Glyndŵr declared Prince of Wales by his followers. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


Iran-US relation

Former Iranian President Mohammad Khatami and Senator John Kerry (D-MA) have expressed similar opinions and shared words with each other in the 2007 World Economic Forum in Davos.[40][41] Mohammad Khatami (Persian : سید محمد خاتمی Seyyed Moḥammad KhātamÄ«), born on September 29, 1943, in Ardakan city of Yazd province, is an Iranian intellectual, philosopher and political figure. ...


Kerry and the George H.W. Bush administration

On November 15, 1988, at a businessmen's breakfast in East Lynn, Massachusetts, Kerry made a joke about then President-elect George H.W. Bush and his running mate, saying "if Bush is shot, the Secret Service has orders to shoot Dan Quayle."[citation needed] He apologized the following day. is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Essex County Settled 1629 Incorporated 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Chip Clancy Area  - City  13. ... A President-elect is a candidate who has officially been elected President, but who has not yet acceded to his Office, as it is still occupied by the out-going President. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Counter Assault Team. ... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the 44th Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989-1993). ...


During their investigation of Noriega, Kerry's staff found reason to believe that the Pakistan-based Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI) had facilitated Noriega's drug trafficking and money laundering. This led to a separate inquiry into BCCI, and as a result, banking regulators shut down BCCI in 1991. In December 1992, Kerry and Senator Hank Brown, a Republican from Colorado, released The BCCI Affair, a report on the BCCI scandal. The report showed that the bank was crooked and was working with terrorists, including Abu Nidal. It blasted the Department of Justice, the Department of the Treasury, the Customs Service, the Federal Reserve Bank, as well as influential lobbyists and the CIA.[42] BCCI in London was closed by the Bank of England in 1991 after evidence emerged of fraud and money laundering. ... Money laundering is the practice of engaging in financial transactions in order to conceal the identity, source and destination of the money in question. ... George Hanks (Hank) Brown (1940-) was a Republican politician and Senator from Colorado. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Abu Nidal in 1976 in a photograph released by the Israeli Defense Forces, one of only a handful of photographs of him known to exist. ... The United States Department of Justice (DOJ) is a Cabinet department in the United States government designed to enforce the law and defend the interests of the United States according to the law and to ensure fair and impartial administration of justice for all Americans. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... The United States Customs Service (now part of U.S. Customs and Border Protection or CBP) was the portion of the US Federal Government dedicated to keeping illegal products outside of US borders. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about the political effort. ...


Kerry was criticized by some Democrats for having pursued his own party members, including former Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford, although Republicans said he should have pressed against some Democrats even harder. The BCCI scandal was later turned over to the Manhattan District Attorney's office.[43] The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Clark McAdams Clifford (December 25, 1906 – October 10, 1998) was a highly influential American lawyer who served Presidents Truman, Kennedy, Johnson and Carter, serving as Secretary of Defense for Johnson. ... Manhattan is a borough of New York City, New York, USA, coterminous with New York County. ...


Precursors to Presidential Bid

See also: Massachusetts United States Senate election, 1996, United States presidential election, 2000 The Massachusetts Senate election of 1996 was held on November 5, 1996 with the incumbent Democratic Senator John Kerry defeating his Republican challenger, Governor Bill Weld. ... Presidential electoral votes. ...


In 1996, Kerry faced a difficult re-election fight against Governor William Weld, a popular Republican incumbent who had been re-elected in 1994 with 71% of the vote. The race was covered nationwide as one of the most closely-watched Senate races that year. Kerry and Weld held several debates and negotiated a campaign spending cap of $6.9 million at Kerry's Beacon Hill mansion. Kerry eventually broke the agreement, which led to his win in a very close race, according to Rob Gray, Mr. Weld's campaign spokesman. "John Kerry will abandon his principles to win," he said, and "Weld would have won if Kerry hadn't spent the money over the cap".[44] During the campaign, Kerry spoke briefly at the 1996 Democratic National Convention. Senator Kerry won re-election with 53 percent to Weld's 45 percent. According to Newsweek, during the 2004 presidential election, Weld was interviewed by Karl Rove, Karen Hughes and other senior members of the Bush campaign on debating and running against Kerry.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Cutting down Beacon Hill, about 1800; a view from the north toward the Massachusetts State House. ... The 1996 Democratic National Convention took place in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Presidential election results map. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush. ... Karen Parfitt Hughes (born December 27, 1956 in Paris, France) is a Republican U.S. political professional from the state of Texas. ... poop This article is about the presidential campaign of George W. Bush, the incumbent President of the United States and winner of the 2004 Presidential Election. ...


In the 2000 presidential election, Kerry again found himself close to being chosen as the vice presidential running mate.[45]


A release from the presidential campaign of presumptive Democratic nominee Al Gore listed Kerry on the short list to be selected as the vice-presidential nominee, along with North Carolina Senator John Edwards, Indiana Senator Evan Bayh, Missouri Congressman Richard Gephardt, New Hampshire Governor Jeanne Shaheen and Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman. Gore eventually selected Lieberman as the nominee, but Kerry continued to campaign on behalf of the Gore-Lieberman campaign through Election Day. Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (last name pronounced buy) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Richard Andrew Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) served as a U.S. Representative from Missouri from 1977 until January 3, 2005. ... Jeanne Shaheen (born January 28, 1947) was the first woman to be elected governor of the U.S. state of New Hampshire. ... Joseph Isadore Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is an American politician from Connecticut. ... More than one country has a day called Election Day. ...


Issues and voting record

John Kerry is a member of the Democratic Leadership Council, which advocates centrist and liberal positions. Most analyses place Kerry's voting record on the left within the Senate Democratic caucus.[46] During the 2004 presidential election he was portrayed as a staunch liberal by conservative special interest groups and the Bush campaign, who often noted that in 2003 Kerry was rated the National Journal's top Senate liberal. However, that rating was based only upon voting on legislation within that past year. In fact, in terms of career voting records, the National Journal found that Kerry is the 11th most liberal member of the Senate. Most analyses find that Kerry is at least slightly more liberal than the typical Democratic Senator. For example, Keith T. Poole of the University of Houston found that Kerry was tied for being the 24th most liberal Senator.[citation needed] The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... National Journal is a weekly magazine about American politics and government, published by National Journal Group, Inc. ... The University of Houston, formerly University of Houston–University Park, is a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting university[1] located in Houston, Texas. ...


Kerry has stated that he opposes privatizing Social Security, supports abortion rights for adult women and minors, supports civil unions for same-sex couples, opposes capital punishment except for terrorists, supports most gun control laws, and is generally a supporter of trade agreements. Kerry supported the North American Free Trade Agreement and Most Favored Nation status for China, but opposed the Central American Free Trade Agreement. Social Security in the United States is a social insurance program funded through dedicated payroll taxes called FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act). ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... Same-sex marriage (also called gay marriage, marriage equality, and often just marriage by its proponents, and—usually by its opponents—homosexual marriage) refers to a marriage between individuals of the same gender (for other forms of same-sex unions that are different from marriages, see the articles... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... Terrorism refers to the use of violence for the purpose of achieving a political, religious, or ideological goal. ... Gun Politics, the political aspects of gun control and firearms rights, has long been among the most controversial and intractable issues in American politics. ... Secretariats Mexico City, Ottawa and Washington, D.C. Official languages English, French and Spanish Membership Canada, Mexico and the United States Establishment  -  Formation 1 January 1994  Website http://www. ... Most favoured nation (or most favored nation, MFN) is a term used in international trade. ... The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) is a free trade agreement between the United States and the Central American countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and Canada, and Mexico. ...


In July 1997 Kerry joined his Senate colleagues in voting against ratification of the Kyoto Treaty on global warming without greenhouse gas emissions limits on nations deemed developing, including India and China.[47] Since then, Kerry has attacked President Bush, charging him with opposition to international efforts to combat global warming.[48] Earth as seen by Apollo 17 The Kyoto Protocol is an amendment to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), an international treaty on global warming. ... Global mean surface temperatures 1850 to 2006 Mean surface temperature anomalies during the period 1995 to 2004 with respect to the average temperatures from 1940 to 1980 Global warming is the observed increase in the average temperature of the Earths atmosphere and oceans in recent decades and the projected...


Iraq

In 1991, during the debate before the Gulf War, Kerry initially opposed the immediate use of military force to expel Iraqi soldiers from Kuwait. The United Nations had imposed sanctions on Iraq, and Kerry argued that the sanctions then in place should be given more time to work. Combatants United States Saudi Arabia Egypt United Kingdom & US-led Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Khalid bin Sultan Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 240 killed in action, 776 wounded, 30 taken prisoner At least 183,000 victims of the Gulf War syndrome Est. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... International sanctions are actions taken by countries against others for political reasons, either unilaterally or multilaterally. ...


On December 14, 2001, 3 months after the attacks of 9/11, Kerry said on Larry King Live that "I think we clearly have to keep the pressure on terrorism globally. This doesn't end with Afghanistan by any imagination. And I think the president has made that clear. I think we have made that clear. Terrorism is a global menace. It's a scourge. And it is absolutely vital that we continue against, for instance, Saddam Hussein." is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Larry King Live is a nightly CNN interview program hosted by broadcaster and writer Larry King. ...


More recently, Kerry said on October 9, 2002; "I will be voting to give the President of the United States the authority to use force, if necessary, to disarm Saddam Hussein because I believe that a deadly arsenal of weapons of mass destruction in his hands is a real and grave threat to our security." Bush relied on that resolution in ordering the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Kerry also gave a January 23, 2003 speech to Georgetown University saying "Without question, we need to disarm Saddam Hussein. He is a brutal, murderous dictator; leading an oppressive regime he presents a particularly grievous threat because he is so consistently prone to miscalculation. So the threat of Saddam Hussein with weapons of mass destruction is real." Kerry did, however, warn that the administration should exhaust its diplomatic avenues before launching war: "Mr. President, do not rush to war, take the time to build the coalition, because it's not winning the war that's hard, it's winning the peace that's hard."[49] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ...


After the invasion of Iraq, when no weapons of mass destruction were found, Kerry strongly criticized Bush, contending that he had misled the country: "When the President of the United States looks at you and tells you something, there should be some trust."[50] For the album, see Weapons of Mass Destruction (album). ...


Kerry had spoken before the war about the sorts of weapons many believed Saddam Hussein had. On the Senate floor on October 9, 2002, he said that "According to the CIA's report, all U.S. intelligence experts agree that Iraq is seeking nuclear weapons. There is little question that Saddam Hussein wants to develop nuclear weapons." is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Other Senate activities

During his Senate career, Kerry has sponsored or cosponsored dozens of bills. Some of his notable bills have addressed small business concerns, education, terrorism, veterans' and POW-MIA issues, marine resource protection and other topics. Of those bills with his sponsorship, as of December 2004, 11 have been signed into law. An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... Former crewmembers of the battleship Missouri pose for photos shortly after the Anniversary of the End of World War II ceremony, held aboard the famous ship. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... MIA is a three-letter acronym that is most commonly used to designate a combatant who is Missing In Action, and has not yet returned or otherwise been accounted for as either dead (KIA) or a prisoner of war (POW). ...


His long-time senior Senate staff includes Chief of Staff David "Mac" McKean and Legislative Director George Abar.


Kerry was the chairman of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee from 1987 to 1989. He was reelected to the Senate in 1990, 1996 (after winning re-election against the then-Governor of Massachusetts Republican William Weld), and 2002. His current term will end on January 3, 2009. DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1990 was an election for the United States Senate in which the Democratic Party increased its majority with a net gain of one seat from the Republicans. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1996 was an election for United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Bill Clinton as president. ... This is a complete list of the governors of Massachusetts, including: governors of the Plymouth Colony, governors of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, presidents of the Dominion of New England, colonial governors of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and governors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...  Republican hold  Republican pickup  Democratic hold  Democratic pickup The U.S. Senate election, 2002 was a fiercely-contested race that resulted in a victory for the Republican Party, which gained two seats and thus a narrow majority from the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2009 (MMIX) will be a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


As of 2007, Kerry serves on four Senate committees and twelve subcommittees:

The U.S. Senate Committee on Finance (or, less formally, Senate Finance Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is a standing committee of the United States Senate in charge of all senate matters related to the following subjects: Coast Guard Coastal zone management Communications Highway safety Inland waterways, except construction Interstate commerce Marine and ocean navigation, safety, and transportation Marine... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs, a subcommittee of the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations has 6 majority members and 4 minority members. ...

2004 presidential election

Kerry, then the Democratic presidential nominee, appearing on The Daily Show to be interviewed by Jon Stewart
Campaign trail in Rochester, Minnesota
Campaign trail in Rochester, Minnesota
Campaign trail in New Mexico
Campaign trail in New Mexico

In the 2004 Democratic Presidential primaries, John Kerry defeated several Democratic rivals, including Sen. John Edwards (D-North Carolina.), former Vermont Governor Howard Dean and retired Gen. Wesley K. Clark. His victory in the Iowa caucuses is widely believed to be the tipping point where Kerry revived his sagging campaign in New Hampshire and the February 3, 2004 primary states like Arizona, South Carolina and New Mexico. Kerry then went on to win landslide victories in Nevada and Wisconsin. Kerry thus won the Democratic nomination to run for President of the United States against incumbent George W. Bush. On July 6, 2004, he announced his selection of John Edwards as his running mate. Presidential election results map. ... This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy Award-winning American satirical television program produced by and airing on Comedy Central. ... Jon Stewart (born Jonathan Stuart Leibowitz on November 28, 1962) is an American comedian, satirist, actor, writer, author, and producer. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2304 × 1728 pixel, file size: 2. ... Coordinates: Country United States State Minnesota County Olmsted Founded 1854 Mayor Ardell Brede Area    - City 103. ... Image File history File linksMetadata John_Kerry_in_New_Mexico. ... Image File history File linksMetadata John_Kerry_in_New_Mexico. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On November 3, 2004, Kerry conceded the race. Kerry won 59.03 million votes or about 48 percent of the popular vote; Bush won 62.04 million votes, or about 51 percent of the popular vote. Kerry received the second-highest number of votes ever for a candidate for president of the United States, Bush getting the highest. Kerry carried states with a total of 252 electoral votes. One Kerry elector voted for Kerry's running mate, Edwards, so in the final tally Kerry had 251 electoral votes to Bush's 286. Although, as in the previous election, there were disputes about the voting, no state was as close as Florida had been in 2000 (see 2004 United States presidential election controversy and irregularities). Though the states of Florida and Ohio certified returns with a nearly twenty percent discrepancy from exit polling (see 2004 United States presidential election controversy, exit polls), the campaign accepted the results. is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Presidential electoral votes. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... Following the 2004 U.S. presidential election, concerns were raised regarding various aspects of the voting process: whether voting had been made accessible to everyone entitled to vote, whether the votes cast had been correctly counted, and whether these irregularities decisively affected the reported outcome of the election. ... After the 2004 U.S. presidential election there were allegations of data irregularities and systematic flaws which may have affected the outcome of both the presidential and local elections. ...


Post-presidential election activities

Potential 2008 candidacy

Immediately after the 2004 election, some Democrats mentioned Kerry as a possible contender for the 2008 Democratic nomination. His brother has said such a campaign is "conceivable," and Kerry himself reportedly said at a farewell party for his 2004 campaign staff, "There's always another four years."[51]


Kerry established a separate political action committee, Keeping America's Promise,[52] that raised money and channeled contributions to Democratic candidates in state and federal races.[53] Through Keeping America's Promise in 2005, Kerry raised over $5.5 million for other Democrats up and down the ballot. Through his campaign account and his political action committee, the Kerry campaign operation generated more than $10 million for various party committees and 179 candidates for the US House, Senate, state and local offices in 42 states focusing on the midterm elections during the last two years.[54] "Cumulatively, John Kerry has done as much if not more than any other individual senator," Hassan Nemazee, the national finance chairman of the DSCC said.[55] In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ...


On January 24, 2007, however, Kerry announced he would not run for President in 2008, instead choosing to run for another Senate term.[56] January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Controversy over comments on Iraq and education

The neutrality of this section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.

On October 30, 2006, Kerry was a headline speaker at a campaign rally being held for Democratic California gubernatorial candidate Phil Angelides at Pasadena City College in Pasadena, California. Speaking to an audience composed mainly of college students, Kerry said, "You know, education, if you make the most of it, you study hard, you do your homework and you make an effort to be smart, you can do well. If you don't, you get stuck in Iraq."[57] Kerry said that he had intended the remark as a jab at President Bush, but he had inadvertently left out the key word "us." Kerry and his aides described these remarks as a "botched joke" aimed at President Bush.[58] In Kerry's prepared remarks, which were released during the ensuing media frenzy, the corresponding line was "… you end up getting us stuck in a war in Iraq. Just ask President Bush."[59] Image File history File links Unbalanced_scales. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2006 California gubernatorial election occurred on November 7, 2006. ... California State Treasurer Phil Angelides Philip Nicholas Phil Angelides (IPA: æn. ... Pasadena City College (commonly known by the abbreviation PCC) is a community college located on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, California, USA. PCC is the third largest community college campus in the United States. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...


The day after the remarks were made public, Republican leaders, including George W. Bush, John McCain and Dennis Hastert, said that Kerry's comments were insulting to American military forces fighting in Iraq. Democratic Representative Harold Ford, Jr. called on Kerry to apologize and Pennsylvania Senate candidate Bob Casey, Jr. canceled an appearance with Kerry, though both accepted his explanation. For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... John Dennis Hastert (born January 2, 1942) is an American politician and former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. ... Harold Eugene Ford, Jr. ... Robert Patrick Casey, Jr. ...


Kerry initially stated: "Let me make it crystal clear, as crystal clear as I know how. I apologize to no one for my criticism of the president and of his broken policy."[60] Kerry also criticized what he felt was unfair criticism from George W. Bush and Dick Cheney (who both did not serve in the Vietnam War as Kerry did), stating "If anyone thinks a veteran would criticize the more than 140,000 heroes serving in Iraq and not the president who got us stuck there, they're crazy. This is the classic G.O.P. playbook. I’m sick and tired of these despicable Republican attacks that always seem to come from those who never can be found to serve in war, but love to attack those who did."[61] Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...


After two days of media coverage, citing a desire not to be a diversion, Kerry apologized to those who took offense at what he called the misinterpretation of his comment.[62]


Personal life

John Kerry
John Kerry

Kerry is 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m),[63] enjoys surfing and windsurfing, as well as ice hockey, hunting and playing bass guitar. According to an interview he gave to Rolling Stone magazine in 2004, Kerry's favorite album is Abbey Road and he is a fan of The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, as well as of Jimi Hendrix and Jimmy Buffett. He also mentioned that he never liked heavy metal.[64] During his 2004 presidential campaign, Kerry used Bruce Springsteen's No Surrender as one of his campaign songs. Later he would adopt U2's "Beautiful Day" as his official campaign song. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1109x1700, 215 KB) Description Promotional photograph of John Kerry with columns in the background. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1109x1700, 215 KB) Description Promotional photograph of John Kerry with columns in the background. ... Hein Cooper at Banzai Pipeline, December 1981 Surfing is a surface water sport. ... A windsurfer with modern gear tilts the rig and carves the board to perform a planing gybe (downwind turn) close to shore in Maui, Hawaii, one of the popular destinations for windsurfing. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... “Hunter” redirects here. ... The electric bass guitar (or electric bass) is a bass string instrument played with the fingers by plucking, slapping, or using a pick. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Back cover The back cover of the original 1969 UK LP. Note that Her Majesty is not listed, unlike later reissues and the compact disc version - originaly making it a hidden track. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Rolling Stones are an English band whose blues, rhythm and blues and rock and roll-infused music became popular during the British Invasion in the early 1960s. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Heavy metals, in chemistry, are chemical elements of a particular range of atomic weights. ... Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen (born September 23, 1949) is an American singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... U2 (IPA: /ju. ...


Kerry is described by Sports Illustrated, among others, as an "avid cyclist",[65][66] primarily riding on a road bike. Prior to his Presidential bid, Kerry was known to have participated in several long-distance rides (centuries). Even during his many campaigns, he was reported to have visited bicycle stores both in his home state and elsewhere. His staff requested recumbent stationary bikes for his hotel rooms.[67] The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Police officer on a bicycle Cycling is a recreation, a sport and a means of transport across land. ... Challenge riding is a form of cycling where the riders challenge themselves rather than each other. ...


In 2003, Kerry was diagnosed with and successfully treated for prostate cancer.[68] Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. ...


Family

Kerry was married to Julia Thorne in 1970, and they had two daughters together: Alexandra and Vanessa. Alexandra was born on September 5, 1973, days before Kerry began law school. A graduate of Brown University, she received her M.F.A. in June 2004 from the AFI Conservatory. She is a documentary filmmaker. Vanessa was born on December 31, 1976. She is a graduate of Phillips Academy (like her grandfather) and Yale University, and attended Harvard Medical School and a master's program in health policy in London. Both daughters were active in their father's 2004 Presidential campaign. For the record label, see Marriage Records. ... Julia Stimson Thorne (September 16, 1944 – April 27, 2006) was a writer and the ex-wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... kerry willis has a big head with 19 fingers also he has size 21 shoes ... Vanessa Bradford Kerry (born December 31, 1976) is the younger daughter of U.S. Senator and former Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1973 Gregorian calendar. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... American Film Institute Campus. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Phillips Academy (also known as Andover, Phillips Andover, or simply P.A.) is a co-educational University preparatory school for boarding and day students in grades 9-12. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ...


In 1982 Thorne, who was suffering from severe depression, asked Kerry for a separation.[69] They were divorced on July 25, 1988, and the marriage was formally annulled by the Roman Catholic Church in 1997. "After 14 years as a political wife, I associated politics only with anger, fear and loneliness" she wrote in A Change of Heart, her book about depression. Thorne later married Richard Charlesworth, an architect, and moved to Bozeman, Montana, where she became active in local environmental groups such as the Greater Yellowstone Coalition. Thorne died of cancer on April 27, 2006. Clinical depression (also called major depressive disorder, or unipolar depression when compared to bipolar disorder) is a state of intense sadness, melancholia or despair that has advanced to the point of being disruptive to an individuals social functioning and/or activities of daily living. ... For the record label, see Divorce Records. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... An architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect is a person who is involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction. ... Bozeman is a city in southwestern Montana, USA. It is the county seat of Gallatin County. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Kerry and his second wife, Teresa Simões-Ferreira Heinz, the widow of Pennsylvania Senator H. John Heinz III, a Republican, and former United Nations interpreter, as well as a member of the Skull and Bones Society, were introduced to each other by John Heinz at an Earth Day rally in 1990. They did not meet again until after John Heinz's death, at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. They married on May 26, 1995, in Nantucket. John Kerry's stepsons — Teresa's three sons from her previous marriage — are H. John Heinz IV, André Heinz and Christopher Heinz, who was married to Alexandra DeRuyter Lewis on February 10, 2007. Maria Teresa Thierstein Simões-Ferreira Heinz Kerry (born October 5, 1938), is a philanthropist and the wife of U.S. Senator John Kerry. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... John Heinz Henry John Heinz III (October 23, 1938 – April 4, 1991) was an American politician from Pennsylvania, a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives (1971–1977) and the United States Senate (1977–1991). ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Earth Day Flag. ... The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, also known as the Earth Summit (or, in Portuguese, Eco 92) was a major conference held in Rio de Janeiro from June 3 to June 14, 1992. ... Location of Rio de Janeiro Coordinates: Country Brazil Region Southeast State Rio de Janeiro Government  - Mayor Cesar Maia (PFL) Area  - City 1,260 km²  (486. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Nantucket County Settled 1641 Incorporated 1671 Government  - Type Open town meeting Area  - Town  105. ... Henry John Heinz IV (born 1966) is the oldest son of Teresa Heinz and the late Senator H. John Heinz III. He is of German American and Portuguese-Mozambican descent. ... Andre Heinz (born 1969) is the son of Theresa Heinz-Kerry and the late John Heinz. ... Christopher Drake Heinz (born 1973) is the youngest of three sons of United States Senator John Heinz and Teresa Heinz. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


The Forbes 400 survey estimated in 2004 that Teresa Heinz Kerry had a net worth of $750 million. However, estimates have frequently varied, ranging from around $165 million to as high as $3.2 billion, according to a study in the Los Angeles Times. Regardless of which figure is correct, Kerry is the wealthiest U.S. Senator. Kerry is wealthy in his own name, and is the beneficiary of at least four trusts inherited from Forbes family members, including his mother, who died in 2002. Forbes magazine (a major business magazine named for an unrelated Forbes family) estimated that if elected, Kerry would have been the third-richest U.S. President in history when adjusted for inflation.[70] This assessment was based on the couple's combined assets, but Kerry and Heinz signed a pre-nuptial agreement that keeps their assets separate. [71] Kerry's financial disclosure form for 2002 put his personal assets in the range of $409,000 to $1.8 million, with additional assets held jointly by Kerry and his wife in the range of $300,000 to $600,000.[72] The Forbes 400 or 400 Richest Americans (est. ... Net worth (sometimes net assets) is the total assets minus total liabilities of an individual or company. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... This article is about the Forbes family related to US Senator John Kerry. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the Forbes family associated with Forbes magazine. ... A prenuptial agreement, commonly abbreviated to prenup, is a contract entered into by two people prior to marriage or civil union. ...


Religious beliefs and practices

A Roman Catholic, Kerry was said to carry a rosary, a prayer book, and a St. Christopher medal (the patron saint of travellers) when he campaigned. However, while Kerry is personally against abortion, he supports a woman's right to have one, which puts him at odds with the Catholic Church. Kerry is a Roman Catholic who supports abortion rights, like several other national political figures, including Rudolph Giuliani, George Pataki, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Discussing his faith, Kerry said, "I thought of being a priest. I was very religious while at school in Switzerland. I was an altar boy and prayed all the time. I was very centered around the Mass and the church." He also said that the Letters of Paul moved him the most, stating that they taught him to "not feel sorry for myself."[73] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... This article is about the Christian saint known as Christopher. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Rudolph William Louis Rudy Giuliani III, KBE (born May 28, 1944) served as the Mayor of New York City from January 1, 1994 through December 31, 2001. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) was the 57th Governor of New York, USA serving from January 1995 until January 1, 2007. ... Arnold Alois Schwarzenegger (German pronunciation (IPA): ) (born July 30, 1947) is an Austrian-American bodybuilder, actor, and politician, currently serving as the 38th Governor of the U.S. state of California. ...


According to Christianity Today, Kerry remarks about his faith: Christianity Today is an Evangelical Christian periodical based in Carol Stream, Illinois. ...

"I'm a Catholic and I practice, but at the same time I have an open-mindedness to many other expressions of spirituality that come through different religions. … I've spent some time reading and thinking about [religion] and trying to study it, and I've arrived at not so much a sense of the differences, but a sense of the similarities in so many ways; the value-system roots and linkages between the Torah, the Qur'an, and the Bible and the fundamental story that runs through all of this, that … really connects all of us."[74] “Tora” redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ...

Trivia

  • He and former Nebraska Governor and Senator Bob Kerrey, both Vietnam War veterans, have often been confused for each other, despite the different spellings of their last names. Bob Kerrey was frequently mentioned as a possible running mate for John Kerry during his 2004 presidential campaign.[citation needed] Before the 2004 election, it was a common urban legend that John Kerry once dated actress Debra Winger, while it was actually Bob Kerrey that dated her.
  • In 1992, John Kerry guest-starred as himself during the opening segment of the Cheers episode "Bar Wars VI: This Time it's for Real".
  • John Kerry and George W. Bush are distant cousins, variously reported as 16th cousins three times removed,[3] 11th cousins[75] and ninth cousins twice removed.[76]
  • Kerry's actions in Vietnam were made into a video game.[77][78]

Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Joseph Robert Bob Kerrey (born August 27, 1943) was the Democratic Governor of Nebraska from 1983 to 1987, and a U.S. Senator from Nebraska (1989–2001). ... This article discusses the John Kerry presidential campaign vice-president selection process that began after Kerry became the presumptive Democratic Party candidate for president of the United States of America in the 2004 election campaign. ... Debra Winger (born May 16, 1955) is an Academy Award- nominated American actress. ... Cheers is a popular American situation comedy produced by Charles-Burrows-Charles Productions in association with CBS Paramount Television for NBC. Cheers was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. ...

Electoral history

Kerry/Edwards campaign logo
Kerry/Edwards campaign logo
John Kerry speaks in Saint Paul, Minnesota on October 10, 2005
John Kerry speaks in Saint Paul, Minnesota on October 10, 2005
  • 2004 Race for U.S. President
    • George W. Bush (R) (inc.), 50.7% (286 electoral votes)
    • John Kerry (D), 48.3% (251 electoral votes)
    • John Edwards (D), 0% (1 electoral vote)
    • Others, 1% (0 electoral votes)
  • 2002 Race for U.S. Senate (MA)
    • John Kerry (D) (inc.), 80%
    • Michael Cloud (L), 18%
    • Randall Forsberg (write-in), 1%
  • 1996 Race for U.S. Senate (MA)
    • John Kerry (D) (inc.), 52%
    • Bill Weld (R), 45%
    • Susan C. Gallagher (Con.), 3%
  • 1990 Race for U.S. Senate (MA)
    • John Kerry (D) (inc.), 55%
    • Jim Rappaport (R), 41%
  • 1984 Race for U.S. Senate (MA)
    • John Kerry (D), 55%
    • Raymond Shamie (R), 45%
  • 1972 Race for U.S. House of Representatives—MA 5th District

This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1090 KB) Summary This photo was taken by user dlz28 and is released into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1090 KB) Summary This photo was taken by user dlz28 and is released into the public domain. ... For an overview of the Twin Cities metropolitan area, see Minneapolis-Saint Paul. ... October 10 is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards [1] (born June 10, 1953), is an American politician who was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004 and a one-term U.S. Senator from North Carolina. ... Dr. Randall Caroline Forsberg has led a lifetime of research and advocacy on ways to reduce the risk of war, minimize the burden of military spending, and promote democratic institutions. ... William Weld Gov. ... Paul William Cronin (March 14, 1938 - April 5, 1997) was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Massachusetts. ...

References

  1. ^ Online NewsHour: Sen. John Kerry's Acceptance Speech July 29, 2004
  2. ^ a b c Kranish, Michael. "A privileged youth, a taste for risk", John Kerry: Candidate in the Making, The Boston Globe Online, 2003-06-15. 
  3. ^ a b Sedensky, Matt. "Bush vs. Kerry? They're distant cousins", Associated Press via MSNBC.com, 2004-02-17. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. 
  4. ^ Reitwiesner, William Addams. The Ancestors of Senator John Forbes Kerry (b. 1943). Archived from the original on 2006-02-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  5. ^ Kelland, Kate (2004-08-16). John Kerry's family traced back to royalty. Reuters via MSNBC.com. Archived from the original on 2006-02-02. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  6. ^ a b Goldhaber, Samuel Z.. "John Kerry: A Navy Dove Runs for Congress", 1970-02-18. 
  7. ^ Leibenluft, Jacob (February 14, 2003). Kerry '66: 'He was going to be president'. Yale Daily News. Archived from the original on 2005-11-18. Retrieved on 2007-01-29.
  8. ^ Kranish, Michael. "Yale grades portray Kerry as a lackluster student: His 4-year average on par with Bush's", The Boston Globe, 2005-06-07. Retrieved on 2007-01-29. 
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  13. ^ Kranish, Michael. "Heroism, and growing concern about war", John Kerry: Candidate in the Making, The Boston Globe Online, 2003-06-16. 
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  29. ^ Lembcke, Jerry. "Still a Force for Peace", Fall 2003. 
  30. ^ Oliphant, Tom. "I watched Kerry throw his war decorations". 
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  35. ^ (1986-10-15) "White House Official Linked To Arms Deliveries to Contras". New York Times: 6. 
  36. ^ Selections from the Senate Committee Report on Drugs, Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy chaired by Senator John F. Kerry. Retrieved on 2006-04-21.
  37. ^ Cockburn, Alexander; Jeffrey St Clair (1999-10-01). Whiteout: The CIA, Drugs and the Press. Verso. ISBN 1-85984-258-5. 
  38. ^ Corn, David (2001-07-16). "Defining John Kerry". The Nation. 
  39. ^ Johnston, David (1992-12-24). "Bush Pardons 6 In Iran Affair, Aborting A Weinberger Trial; Prosecutor Assails 'Cover-Up' Bush Diary at Issue 6-Year Inquiry Into Deal of Arms for Hostages All but Swept Away". New York Times. 
  40. ^ Khatami & Kerry: A Common Denominator
  41. ^ Young Iranians Warn Pressure Could Stren
  42. ^ Sirota, David; Baskin, Jonathan (September 2004). Follow the Money.
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  44. ^ Zernike, Kate (2004-02-07). "Facing '96 Loss, Brawling Kerry Fought to Win". The New York Times. 
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  48. ^ "Kerry says U.S. 'a sort of international pariah'", USA TODAY, 2007-01-27. 
  49. ^ "Kerry Makes It Official", CBS, 2003-09-02. 
  50. ^ "Bush defends Iraq war in face of WMD findings", CNN, 2004-01-28. 
  51. ^ Johnson, Glen. "Kerry run in '08 called conceivable", The Boston Globe, 2004-11-09. 
  52. ^ Keeping America's Promise
  53. ^ Johnson, Glen. "Kerry creates PAC to back candidates", The Boston Globe, 2004-12-05. 
  54. ^ Mooney, Brain C.. "Kerry's barnstorming sparks talk of a run", The Boston Globe, 2006-10-09. 
  55. ^ Klein, Rick, Kranish, Michael. "Kerry is pressured to share campaign wealth", The Boston Globe, 2006-10-21. 
  56. ^ Klein, Rick. "Kerry won't run for president in '08", The Boston Globe, 2007-01-24. Retrieved on 2007-01-25. 
  57. ^ Ryan, Andrew. "Kerry says he "botched joke" and lashes out at GOP", Boston Globe, October 31, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  58. ^ Sandalow, Marc. "'Botched joke' feeds a frenzy among Dems, GOP and media", San Francisco Chronicle, November 2, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  59. ^ Zernike, Kate. "Flubbed Joke Makes Kerry a Political Punching Bag, Again", New York Times, November 1, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  60. ^ Loven, Jennifer. "Some Democrats join Republicans in pressing Kerry for apology", Houston Chronicle, November 1, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  61. ^ Statement of John Kerry Responding to Republican Distortions, Pathetic Tony Snow Diversions and Distractions. Friends of John Kerry (October 31, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-11.
  62. ^ Stout, David. "Kerry Apologizes for Iraq Remark", New York Times, November 1, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-01-11. 
  63. ^ Nagourney, Adam. "Antiwar Veteran Eager for Battle", The New York Times, 2002-12-09. 
  64. ^ Wenner, Jann S.. "John Kerry", Rolling Stone, 2004-11-11. 
  65. ^ Maloney, Tim. "Kerry Au Tour", 2005-07-24. 
  66. ^ "Politics? Armstrong has Kerry's vote … maybe", 2005-07-23. 
  67. ^ JK hotel needs.
  68. ^ "Sen. Kerry 's Surgery A Success", CBS, 2003-02-11. 
  69. ^ [21]
  70. ^ Ackman, Dan. "Kerry Would Be Third-Richest U.S. President If Elected", Forbes.com, 2004-10-29. 
  71. ^ What is George W. Bush's net worth vs. John Kerry's net worth?. Ask Yahoo! (2004-08-23).
  72. ^ Healy, Patrick. "Kerry mortgage to help fund race", The Boston Globe, 2003-12-19. 
  73. ^ Caldwell, Deborah. John Kerry's Spiritual Biography.
  74. ^ Stricherz, Mark (2004-10-01). John Kerry's Open Mind. ChristianityToday.
  75. ^ http://www.samsloan.com/kerrybush.htm
  76. ^ http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/03/04/politics/main604163.shtml
  77. ^ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6029742/
  78. ^ http://www.kumawar.com/Kerry/screenshots.php

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February 18 is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Insert non-formatted text here{| style=float:right; |- | paul is so hot sophie loves him |- | |} is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 29 is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... 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Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS Broadcasting, Inc. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays full 2006 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Adam Nagourney (born October 10, 1954 in New York City) is an American journalist covering US politics for The New York Times. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

  • Dudley-Winthrop Family
  • Daily Kos, Kerry is an occasional contributor to this political community blog [22]

The Dudley-Winthrop Family is a U.S. political family. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political blog, publishing news and opinion from a liberal point of view. ...

External links and references

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
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Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

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Official

The logo of Internet Archive The Internet Archive (IA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining an on-line library and archive of Web and multimedia resources. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ...

Media

Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Joe Klein (born September 7, 1946) is a longtime Washington, D.C. and New York journalist and columnist, perhaps best known for his novel Primary Colors, an anonymously-written roman à clef portraying Bill Clintons first presidential campaign. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Boston Globe (and Boston Sunday Globe) is the most widely circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and New England. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Look up popular, populus, populous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Project Vote Smart (PVS) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the United States. ... The Hour is a Canadian television newsmagazine broadcast on CBC Television. ... George Paul Stroumboulopoulos (born August 16, 1972 in Malton, now part of the City of Mississauga, Ontario), commonly nicknamed Strombo, is a Canadian television and radio personality. ...

Information

  • John Kerry on the issues
  • John Kerry Family Tree
  • Statement on behalf of Vietnam Veterans Against the War—April 1971.
  • Senator John Kerry's voting record
  • John Kerry's Senate hearing testimony to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations in 1971 (PDF file).
  • Voting history for Senator John F. Kerry of Massachusetts in the 108th Congress
  • The BCCI Affair, A Report to the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, by Senator John Kerry and Senator Hank Brown, December 1992
  • Political donations made by John Kerry
  • Snopes.com: "Service Mettle"—Snopes.com on Kerry's Vietnam service medals
  • Tour of Duty—excerpt from Brinkley's book about Kerry's Vietnam service
  • Irish Catholic or Czech Jew?—Kerry's long lost Jewish ethnic ancestry
  • John Kerry's letter to his parents about Richard Pershing's death—1968.
  • Project Votesmart biography

The Urban Legends Reference Pages, also known as snopes. ...

Further reading

  • Brinkley, Douglas, Tour of Duty: John Kerry and the Vietnam War, William Morrow & Company, 2004. ISBN 0-06-056523-3
  • Kerry, John and Vietnam Veterans Against the War, The New Soldier, MacMillan Publishing Company, 1971. ISBN 0-02-073610-X
  • Kerry, John, The New War: The Web of Crime That Threatens America's Security, Simon & Schuster, 1997. ISBN 0-684-81815-9
  • Kerry, John, A Call to Service: My Vision for a Better America, Viking Press, 2003. ISBN 0-670-03260-3
  • Kerry, John and Teresa Heinz Kerry, This Moment on Earth: Today's New Environmentalists and Their Vision for the Future, PublicAffairs, 2007. ISBN 978-1-586-48431-6
  • Kranish, Michael, Brian C. Mooney, and Nina J. Easton. John F. Kerry: The Complete Biography by the Boston Globe Reporters Who Know Him Best, PublicAffairs, 2004. ISBN 1-58648-273-4
  • McMahon, Kevin, David Rankin, Donald W. Beachler and John Kenneth White. Winning the White House, 2004, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. ISBN 1-4039-6881-0
  • O'Neill, John E. & Corsi, Jerome R. Unfit for Command: Swift Boat Veterans Speak Out Against John Kerry, Regnery Publishing, 2004. ISBN 0-89526-017-4
Preceded by
Thomas P. O'Neill III
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
Served Under: Michael Dukakis

1983–1985
Succeeded by
Evelyn Murphy
Preceded by
Paul Tsongas
United States Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
1985–Present
Served alongside: Ted Kennedy
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
George Mitchell
Maine
Chairman of Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
1987–1989
Succeeded by
John Breaux
Louisiana
Preceded by
Christopher "Kit" Bond
Missouri
Chairman of Senate Small Business Committee
2001–2003
Succeeded by
Olympia Snowe
Maine
Preceded by
Olympia Snowe
Maine
Chairman of Senate Small Business Committee
2007–Present
Succeeded by
Present
Preceded by
Al Gore
Democratic Party Presidential nominee
2004 (lost)
Succeeded by
Most recent
(a) Most recent presidential election as of 2007
Current Committee Assignments
Committee Position
Commerce, Science, and Transportation Subcommittee Chairman
Finance Subcommittee Chairman
Foreign Relations Subcommittee Chairman
Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee Chairman
Persondata
NAME Kerry, John Forbes
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, 2004 Presidential candidate for the Democratic Party
DATE OF BIRTH 11 December 1943
PLACE OF BIRTH Aurora, Colorado
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Prosecute Kerry (294 words)
John Kerry Must be Indicted and Disqualified from National Office
John Kerry is, at best, a phony and fraud.
In an effort to better relate to America's middle class, Senator John Kerry has limited his home ownership to five properties with a combined assessed value of over $28 million.
John Kerry - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8857 words)
John Kerry was born in the west wing of Fitzsimons Army Hospital in Aurora, Colorado outside Denver
Kerry has said that his first memory is from when he was three years old, of holding his crying mother's hand while they walked through the broken glass and rubble of her childhood home in Saint-Briac, France.
Kerry directed the boats "to turn to the beach and charge the Viet Cong positions" and he "expertly directed" his boat's fire and coordinated the deployment of the South Vietnamese troops, according to Admiral Zumwalt's original medal citation, which critics have complained was based on Kerry's own self-report.
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