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Encyclopedia > John Keats
John Keats

Born October 31, 1795(1795-10-31)
London, England
Died February 23, 1821 (aged 25)
Rome, Papal States
Occupation Poet
Literary movement Romanticism
Signature
Keats' grave in Rome
Keats' grave in Rome

John Keats (IPA: /ˈkiːts/; 31 October 179523 February 1821[1]) was one of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement. During his short life, his work received constant critical attacks from the periodicals of the day, but his posthumous influence on poets such as Alfred Tennyson has been immense. Elaborate word choice and sensual imagery characterize Keats's poetry, including a series of odes that were his masterpieces and which remain among the most popular poems in English literature. Keats's letters, which expound on his aethestic theory of "negative capability", are among the most celebrated by any writer. Keats may refer to the following: John Keats, Poet Vice-Admiral Sir Richard Keats, Governor of Newfoundland Ezra Jack Keats, Author Duke Keats, Ice hockey player Keats House, Home of poet John Keats Keats Island, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Coat of arms Map of the Papal States; the reddish area was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy in 1860, the rest (grey) in 1870. ... This article is about work. ... ... Romantics redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 440 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (939 × 1,280 pixels, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 440 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (939 × 1,280 pixels, file size: 186 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the art form. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Romantics redirects here. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... For other uses, see Ode (disambiguation). ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Negative capability is a theory of the poet John Keats, expressed in his letter to George and Thomas Keats dated Sunday, 21 December 1817. ...

Contents

Life

Life and Death masks, Rome
Life and Death masks, Rome

John Keats was born in 1795 at 85 Moorgate in London, where his father, Thomas Keats, was a hostler. The pub is now called "Keats The Grove", only a few yards from Moorgate station. Keats was baptised at St Botolph-without-Bishopsgate and lived happily for the first seven years of his life. The beginnings of his troubles occurred in 1804, when his father died from a fractured skull after falling from his horse. His mother, Frances Jennings Keats, remarried soon afterwards, but quickly left the new husband and moved herself and her four children (a son had died in infancy) to live with Keats' grandmother, Alice Jennings. There, Keats attended a school that first instilled in him a love of literature. In 1810, however, his mother died of tuberculosis, leaving him and his siblings in the custody of their grandmother. Keats' grandmother appointed two guardians to take care of her new "charges", and these guardians removed Keats from his old school to become a surgeon's apprentice. This continued until 1814, when, after a fight with his master, he left his apprenticeship and became a student at Guy's Hospital. During that year, he devoted more and more of his time to the study of literature. Keats travelled to the Isle of Wight in the spring of 1819, where he spent a week. Later that year he stayed in Winchester. It was in Winchester that Keats wrote Isabella, St. Agnes' Eve and Lamia. Parts of Hyperion and the five-act poetic tragedy Otho The Great were also written in Winchester. photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran John Keats File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran John Keats File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... // William Blake, The Book of Los, The Book of Ahania, The Song of Los, and The Songs of Innocence and Experience Philip Morin Freneau, Poems Walter Savage Landor, Poems Joseph Ritson, editor, Robin Hood: A Collection of all the Ancient Poems October 31 — John Keats English poet Thomas Carlyle George... Map of London Wall, Moorgate and Moorfields, 2004. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... An ostler is a person employed in a stable to take care of horses. ... Moorgate station is a London Underground and National Rail station in the City of London, on Moorgate, north of London Wall. ... St Botolph-without-Bishopsgate is a Church of England church in the City of London, dedicated to St Botolph. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... Winchester is a historic city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ...


Following the death of his grandmother, he soon found his brother, Tom Keats, entrusted to his care. Tom was suffering, as his mother had, from tuberculosis. Finishing his epic poem "Endymion", Keats left to work in Scotland and Ireland with his friend Charles Brown. However, he too began to show signs of tuberculosis infection on that trip, and returned prematurely. When he did, he found that Tom's condition had deteriorated, and that Endymion had, as had Poems before it, been the target of much abuse from the critics. On 1 December 1818, Tom Keats died from his disease, and John Keats moved again, to live in Brown's house in Hampstead. There he lived next door to Fanny Brawne, where she had been staying with her mother. He then quickly fell in love with Fanny. However, it was overall an unhappy affair for the poet; Keats' ardour for her seemed to bring him more vexation than comfort. The later (posthumous) publication of their correspondence was to scandalise Victorian society. In the diary of Fanny Brawne was found only one sentence regarding the separation: "Mr. Keats has left Hampstead." Fanny's letters to Keats were, as the poet had requested, destroyed upon his death. Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Endymion is a poem by John Keats first published in 1818. ... This article is about the country. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

The Spanish Steps, Rome, Italy, seen from Piazza di Spagna. John Keats lived in the house in the right foreground.
The Spanish Steps, Rome, Italy, seen from Piazza di Spagna. John Keats lived in the house in the right foreground.

This relationship was cut short when, by 1820, Keats began showing worse signs of the disease that had plagued his family. On the suggestion of his doctors, he left the cold airs of London behind and moved to Italy with his friend Joseph Severn. Keats moved into a house on the Spanish Steps, in Rome, where despite attentive care from Severn and Dr. John Clark, the poet's health rapidly deteriorated. He died in 1821 and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery, Rome. His last request to be buried under a tomb stone reading, "Here lies one whose name was writ in water." His name was not to appear on the stone. Despite these requests, however, Severn and Brown also added the epitaph: "This Grave contains all that was mortal, of a YOUNG ENGLISH POET, who on his Death Bed, in the Bitterness of his heart, at the Malicious Power of his enemies, desired these words to be Engraven on his Tomb Stone" along with the image of a lyre with broken strings. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,288 × 1,712 pixels, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,288 × 1,712 pixels, file size: 3. ... The Spanish Steps, seen from Piazza di Spagna. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... // Formation of the Apostles, a Cambridge University intellectual society John Keats begins showing worse signs of tuberculosis. ... Joseph Severn (December 7, 1793 - August 3, 1879) was a British portrait and subject painter. ... The Spanish Steps, seen from Piazza di Spagna. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... — words chisled onto the tombstone of John Keats, at his request // Shelleys Tomb in the Protestant Cemetery in Rome (1873) by Walter Crane. ... Shelleys Tomb in the Protestant Cemetery in Rome, an 1873 painting by Walter Crane. ... Headstones in the Japanese Cemetry in Broome, Western Australia A cemetery in rural Spain A typical late 20th century headstone in the United States A headstone, tombstone or gravestone is a marker, normally carved from stone, placed over or next to the site of a burial. ...


Shelley blamed his death on an article published shortly before in the Quarterly Review, with a scathing attack on Keats's Endymion. The offending article was long believed to have been written by William Gifford, though later shown to be the work of John Wilson Croker. Keats' death inspired Shelley to write the poem Adonais.'; Byron later composed a short poem on this theme using the phrase "snuffed out by an article". However Byron, far less admiring of Keats' poetry than Shelley and generally more cynical in nature, was here probably just as much poking fun at Shelley's interpretation as he was having a dig at his old fencing partners the critics. (see below, Byron's other less than serious poem on the same subject). Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Quarterly Review was a review journal started by John Murray, the celebrated London publisher, in March 1809 (though it bore a title page date of February), in rivalry with the Edinburgh Review, which had been seven years in possession of the field, and was exerting, as he judged, an evil... Endymion may be: Fictional character: Endymion (mythology), Greek shepherd A form of Mamoru Chiba in the Sailor Moon series Titled work: Endymion (poem), by Keats Endymion (Longfellow), poem Endymion, 1996 science fiction novel within Dan Simmonss Hyperion Cantos: Endymion Endymion (Disraeli), 1880 novel Endymion (play), by John Lyly Astronomy... William Gifford (1756 - 1826), critic and poet, was born of humble parentage at Ashburton, Devonshire, and after being for a short time at sea, was apprenticed to a cobbler. ... John Wilson Croker (December 20, 1780 - August 10, 1857) was a British statesman and author. ... Adonais is an epic poem written by Percy Bysshe Shelley as an elegy to John Keats in 1821. ... The poet George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron is often referred to simply as Byron. ...


The largest collection of Keats's letters, manuscripts, and other papers is in the Houghton Library at Harvard University. Other collections of such material will be found at the British Library; Keats's House, Hampstead; Keats-Shelley Memorial House, Rome; and the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York.


Career and criticism

John Keats
John Keats

His introduction to the work of Edmund Spenser, particularly The Faerie Queene, was to prove a turning point in Keats' development as a poet; it was to inspire Keats to write his first poem, Imitation of Spenser. He befriended Leigh Hunt, a poet and editor who published his first poem in 1816. In 1817, Keats published his first volume of poetry entitled simply Poems. Keats' Poems was not well received, largely due to his connection with the controversial Hunt. Keats produced some of his finest poetry during the spring and summer of 1819; in fact, the period from September 1818 to September 1819 is often referred to among Keats scholars as the Great Year, or the Living Year, because it was during this period that he was most productive and that he wrote his most critically acclaimed works. Several major events have been noted as factors in this increased productivity: namely, the death of his brother Tom, the critical reviews of Endymion, and his meeting of Fanny Brawne. The famous odes he produced during the spring and summer of 1819 include: Ode to Psyche, Ode on a Grecian Urn, Ode to a Nightingale, Ode on Melancholy, and To Autumn. Image File history File links John_keats. ... Image File history File links John_keats. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Una and the Lion by Briton Rivière The Faerie Queene is an English epic poem by Edmund Spenser, published first in three books in 1590, and later in six books in 1596. ... An artists rendering of James Henry Leigh Hunt James Henry Leigh Hunt (October 19, 1784 - August 28, 1859) was an English essayist and writer. ... // This year was known as the Year Without a Summer after Mount Tambora had erupted in the Dutch East Indies the previous year and cast enough ash in to the atmosphere to block out the sun and cause abnormal weather across much of Northeastern United States and Northern Europe. ... — opening line of John Keats Endymion, published this year // February 28 — Lord Byron writes a letter to Thomas Moore and includes in it his poem, So, well go no more a roving. Moore will publish the poem in 1830 as part of Letters and Journals of Lord Byron. ... // John Keats The period from September 1818 to September of this year is often referred to among scholars of John Keats as the Great Year, or the Living Year, because during this period he was most productive, writing his most critically acclaimed works. ... // John Keats falls in love with Fanny Brawne (1800-65) and writes some of his finest poetry — the period from September of this year to September 1819 is often referred to among Keats scholars as the Great Year, or the Living Year (see 1819 in poetry) March 12 — Percy Bysshe... Endymion is a poem by John Keats first published in 1818. ... // John Keats The period from September 1818 to September of this year is often referred to among scholars of John Keats as the Great Year, or the Living Year, because during this period he was most productive, writing his most critically acclaimed works. ... Ode to Psyche is one of the famous odes of John Keats, an English Romantic poet. ... Ode on a Grecian Urn is a poem by John Keats, first published in January 1819 (c. ... Ode to a Nightingale is a poem by John Keats. ... A poem by John Keats. ... To Autumn is a poem written by English Romantic poet John Keats in 1819 (published 1820). ...


Keats developed his poetic theories, chief among them Negative Capability and The Mansion of Many Apartments, in letters to friends and family. In particular, he stated he wished to be a "chameleon poet" and to resist the "egotistical sublime" of Wordsworth's writing. Oscar Wilde, the aestheticist non pareil was to later write: "[...] who but the supreme and perfect artist could have got from a mere colour a motive so full of marvel: and now I am half enamoured of the paper that touched his hand, and the ink that did his bidding, grown fond of the sweet comeliness of his charactery, for since my childhood I have loved none better than your marvellous kinsman, that godlike boy, the real Adonis of our age[...] In my heaven he walks eternally with Shakespeare and the Greeks." Negative capability is a theory of the poet John Keats, expressed in his letter to George and Thomas Keats dated Sunday, 21 December 1817. ... The Mansion of Many Apartments is a theory of the poet John Keats, expressed in his letter to John Hamilton Reynolds dated Sunday, 3 May 1818. ... Wordsworth, an underground hip hop MC from Brooklyn. ... Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. ... In Greek mythology Adonis (Greek: , also: Άδωνις) is an archetypal life-death-rebirth deity of Semitic origin, and a central cult figure in various mystery religions. ...


Percy Bysshe Shelley, in his elegy Adonais described Keats thusly: Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Adonais is an epic poem written by Percy Bysshe Shelley as an elegy to John Keats in 1821. ...

He is made one with Nature: there is heard
His voice in all her music; from the moan
Of thunder to the song of night's sweet bird;
He is a presence to be felt and known
In darkness and in light, from herb and stone,
Spreading itself where'er that Power may move
Which has withdrawn his being to its own;
Which wields the world with never wearied love,
Sustains it from beneath, and kindles it above.
He is a portion of the loveliness
Which once he made more lovely: he doth bear
His part, while the one Spirit's plastic stress
Sweeps through the dull dense world, compelling there
All new successions to the forms they wear.'

Adonais, St: 42 & 43.


William Butler Yeats was intrigued by the contrast between the "deliberate happiness" of Keats's poetry and the sadness that characterised his life. He wrote in Ego Dominus Tuus (1915): William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...

I see a schoolboy when I think of him,
With face and nose pressed to a sweet-shop window,
For certainly he sank into his grave
His senses and his heart unsatisfied,
And made – being poor, ailing and ignorant,
Shut out from all the luxury of the world,
The coarse-bred son of a livery-stable keeper –
Luxuriant song.

Wallace Stevens described Keats as the "Secretary for Porcelain" in Extracts from Addresses to the Academy of Fine Ideas. Wallace Stevens Wallace Stevens (October 2, 1879 – August 2, 1955) was a major American Modernist poet. ...

Let the Secretary for Porcelain observe
That evil made magic, as in catastrophe,
If neatly glazed, becomes the same as the fruit
Of an emperor, the egg-plant of a prince.
The good is evil's last invention.

Lord Byron wrote (in a parody of the nursery rhyme 'Who killed Cock Robin?') on Keats' death in 1821: Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... A nursery rhyme is a traditional song or poem taught to young children, originally in the nursery. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Who Killed Cock Robin. ...

Who kill'd John Keats?
"I," says the Quarterly,
So savage and Tartarly;
"'Twas one of my feats."
Who shot the arrow?
"The poet-priest Milman
(So ready to kill man),
Or Southey, or Barrow."

Popular references

  • Dan Simmons's science-fiction novels of the Hyperion Cantos feature two characters with the cloned body of John Keats, as well as his personality (reconstructed and programmed into an AI). Some of the main themes of these novels, as well as their names, draw upon John Keats's poems "Hyperion" and "Endymion".
  • A quote from Keats also appears in Phillip Pullman's novel The Subtle Knife, "...capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason -" (from a 21 Dec. 1817 letter by Keats on his theory of negative capability).
  • Two films about Keats's life are in pre-production as of July 2007: a period drama about Keats's romance with Fanny Brawne titled Bright Star, directed by Jane Campion, and a mockumentary 'grunge' musical based on Keats's letters and set in Seattle at the beginning of the 1990s, titled Negative Capability, directed by Daniel Gildark.
  • Keats in Hampstead, a play, written and directed by James Veitch and based on the poet's time at Wentworth Place, premiered in the garden of Keats House in July 2007.
  • A radio play The Mask Of Death on the final days of John Keats in Rome written by the Indian English poet Gopi Kottoor captures the last days of the young poet as revealed through his circle of friends (Severn), his poetry and letters.
  • The popular teen series Gossip Girl mention Keats throughout the novels as the male protagonist Daniel Humphrey's poetic hero and is referenced numerous times by the character.
  • The indie-punk band Tellison mention John Keats in the song Architects on their album Contact! Contact!
  • J. D. Salinger, in his novella Seymour: An Introduction, introduces the reader to a certain haiku, the authorship of which he attributes to his most complex fictional creation, Seymour Glass. The haiku reads as follows: "John Keats/ John Keats/ John/ Please put your scarf on." Obviously, this is in reference to Keats' unfortunate premature death by Tuberculosis, a condition aggravated by cold weather.

The Smiths were an English rock band active from 1982 to 1987. ... The Queen Is Dead is the third studio album of The Smiths. ... William Butler Yeats, 1933. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos form a tetralogy of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. ... Hyperion is an uncompleted epic poem by 19th-century English Romantic poet John Keats. ... Endymion is a poem by John Keats first published in 1818. ... Natasha Anne Bedingfield (born 26 November 1981) is an English singer and songwriter who debuted in the 1990s as a member of the Christian dance/electronic group The DNA Algorithm with her siblings Daniel Bedingfield and Nikola Rachelle. ... These Words (also known as These Words (I Love You, I Love You) and These Words (I Love You)) is a song by Natasha Bedingfield, and is the second European single (the first North American) from her debut album Unwritten. ... Byron redirects here. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... Philip Pullman Philip Pullman, (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer, educated at Exeter College, Oxford, who is the best-selling author of the His Dark Materials trilogy of fantasy novels and a number of other books, purportedly for children, but attracting increasing attention by adult readers. ... For the weapon mentioned in this book, see Æsahættr. ... Gopi K Kottoor (b. ... This article is about the book series. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) (pronounced ) is an American author best known for his 1951 novel The Catcher in the Rye and his reclusive nature. ... Seymour Glass was the oldest of the children in J. D. Salingers fictional Glass Family. ...

Bibliography

  • On Peace (1814) text
  • On receiving a curious Shell
  • On Seeing the Elgin Marbles for the First Time
  • On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again
  • On the Grasshopper and Cricket
  • On the Sea text
  • On The Sonnet
  • The Poet (a fragment)
  • A Prophecy - To George Keats in America
  • Robin Hood
  • Sharing Eve's Apple
  • Sleep and Poetry
  • A Song of Opposites
  • Specimen of an Induction to a Poem
  • Staffa
  • Stanzas
  • Think Not of It, Sweet One
  • This Living Hand
  • To —
  • To a Cat
  • To A Friend Who Sent Me Some Roses
  • To a Lady seen for a few Moments at Vauxhall
  • To A Young Lady Who Sent Me A Laurel Crown
  • To Autumn
  • To Ailsa Rock
  • To Autumn (1819) text
  • To Byron text
  • To Charles Cowden Clarke
  • To Chatterton
  • To Fanny
  • To G.A.W. (Georgiana Augusta Wylie)
  • To George Felton Mathew
  • To Georgiana Augusta Wylie
  • To Haydon
  • To Homer
  • To Hope
  • To John Hamilton Reynolds
  • To Kosciusko
  • To My Brother
  • To My Brothers
  • To one who has been long in city pent
  • To Sleep
  • To Solitude
  • To Some Ladies
  • To the Nile
  • Two Sonnets on Fame
  • When I have fears that I may cease to be (1818) text
  • Where Be Ye Going, You Devon Maid?
  • Where's the Poet?
  • Why did I laugh tonight?
  • Woman! when I behold thee flippant, vain
  • Written in Disgust of Vulgar Superstition
  • Written on a Blank Space
  • Written on a Summer Evening
  • Written on the Day that Mr Leigh Hunt Left Prison
  • Written Upon the Top of Ben Nevis
  • You say you love

Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art is the first line of a sonnet by John Keats that was first published in a Plymouth newspaper in 1838. ... Endymion is a poem by John Keats first published in 1818. ... The Eve of St. ... — opening line of John Keats Endymion, published this year // February 28 — Lord Byron writes a letter to Thomas Moore and includes in it his poem, So, well go no more a roving. Moore will publish the poem in 1830 as part of Letters and Journals of Lord Byron. ... Hyperion is an uncompleted epic poem by 19th-century English Romantic poet John Keats. ... Isabella, or the Pot of Basil (1818) is a narrative poem by John Keats adapted from a story in Boccaccios Decameron (IV, 5). ... Categories: Stub | Poems | British poems ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Lines is a poem written by Patrick Branwell Bronte in 1834. ... Ode on a Grecian Urn is a poem by John Keats, first published in January 1819 (c. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... A poem by John Keats. ... Ode to a Nightingale is a poem by John Keats. ... Ode to Psyche is one of the famous odes of John Keats, an English Romantic poet. ... On First Looking into Chapmans Homer is a sonnet by English Romantic poet John Keats (1795-1821), written in October 1816. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Fingals Cave around 1900 View from West to East Staffa (Norse for staff, column, or pillar island), an island of the Inner Hebrides in Argyll and Bute, Scotland. ... In poetry, a stanza is a unit within a larger poem. ... To Autumn is a poem written by English Romantic poet John Keats in 1819 (published 1820). ... To Autumn is a poem written by English Romantic poet John Keats in 1819 (published 1820). ... When I have Fears that I may Cease to Be is a poem by John Keats. ...

References

  1. ^ "He is gone--he died with the most perfect ease--he seemed to go to sleep. On the 23rd, about 4, the approaches of death came on. "Severn-I--lift me up--I am dying--I shall die easy--don't be frightened--be firm, and thank God it has come!" I lifted him up in my arms. The phlegm seemed boiling in his throat, and increased until 11, when he gradually sunk into death--so quiet-that I still thought he slept. I cannot say now-I am broken down from four nights' watching, and no sleep since, and my poor Keats gone. Three days since, the body was opened; the lungs were completely gone. The Doctors could not conceive by what means he had lived these two months. I followed his poor body to the grave on Monday, with many English. They take such care of me here--that I must, else, have gone into a fever. I am better now--but still quite disabled." Severn, in a letter to Charles Brown[1]
  • Goslee, Nancy (1985), Uriel's Eye: Miltonic Stationing and Statuary in Blake, Keats and Shelley, University of Alabama Press, ISBN 0817302433
  • Jones, Michael (1984), "Twilight of the Gods: The Greeks in Schiller and Lukacs", Germanic Review 59 (2): 49-56.
  • Lachman, Lilach (1988), "History and Temporalization of Space: Keats's Hyperion Poems.", Proceedings of the XII Congress of the International Comparative Literature Association, edited by Roger Bauer and Douwe Fokkema (Munich, Germany): 159-164.
  • Keats, John & Stillinger, Jack (1982), Complete Poems, Cambridge, Massachusetts: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, ISBN 0674154304
  • Wolfson, Susan J., The Questioning Presence., Ithaca, New York, ISBN 0801419093

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Persondata
NAME Keats, John
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION one of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement
DATE OF BIRTH October 31, 1795
PLACE OF BIRTH London, England
DATE OF DEATH February 23, 1821
PLACE OF DEATH Rome, Italy

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Keats - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1071 words)
John Keats (October 31, 1795 – February 23, 1821) was one of the principal poets of the English Romantic movement.
Keats' poetry is characterized by an exuberant love of language and a rich, sensuous imagination; he often felt that he was working in the shadow of past poets, and only towards the end of his life was he able to produce his most original and most memorable poems.
Keats was born on October 31, 1795 in Finsbury Pavement in London, where his father was an ostler.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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