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Encyclopedia > John Jay Hooker

John Jay Hooker, Jr. (born 1930) is a Nashville, Tennessee attorney, entrepreneur, perennial candidate and political gadfly. 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... [Nashville skyline] <<a href=b class=external free title=b>b>Nashville</<a href=b class=external free title=b>b> is the capital of the [state] of [Tennessee]. It is located on the [River] in [County, Tennessee|Davidson County]. Nicknamed Music City, U.S.A., Nashville is the home... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... Entrepreneur is an import from the same French word. ... A perennial candidate is one who frequently runs for public office with a record of success that is either infrequent or non-existent. ... Gadfly is a term for people who upset the status quo by posing upsetting or novel questions, or attempts to stimulate innovation by proving an irritant. ...

Contents


Early life

Hooker was born to relative wealth and privilege in one of the Nashville area's more prominent families. His father, John Jay Hooker, Sr., was one of the Nashville area's best-known and most respected attorneys, as his brother Henry Hooker has also become. He was a descendant of the first Chief Justice of the United States and his namesake, John Jay, and also "Fighting Joe" Hooker, a Union general in the American Civil War whose camp-followers are said to have been the source of a well-known slang term for prostitutes which began as "Hooker's girls". John Jay Hooker could have easily been much more like his father and brother, but took a different path. The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the Judicial Branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... John Jay, first Chief Justice of the United States Oil painting by Gilbert Stuart, 1794 John Jay (December 12, 1745 – May 17, 1829) was an American politician, statesman, revolutionary, diplomat and jurist. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Prostitution is the sale of sexual services (typically manual stimulation, oral sex, sexual intercourse, or anal sex) for cash or other kind of return, generally indiscriminately with many persons. ...


Legal Career

After finishing high school at Nashville's prestigious Montgomery Bell Academy, Hooker attended college at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. He then served two years in the United States Army Judge Advocate General Corps as an investigator. Upon discharge from the service, Hooker attended the Vanderbilt University law school. He graduated and was admitted to the Tennessee bar in 1957. Struck by the inequalities in the Southern society that confronted him at the time, he became identified as a young man with progressive Democratic politics. While practicing law, he also began a series of diverse business investments. Japanese high school students in uniform High school, or Secondary school, is the last segment of compulsory education in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan (Republic of China) (only junior high school) and the United States. ... Montgomery Bell Main Gate Montgomery Bell Academy is a preparatory school in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The University of the South The University of the South is located in Sewanee, Tennessee, and is a private, coeducational liberal arts college. ... Sewanee is a census-designated place located in Franklin County, Tennessee. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... This article is in reference to the U.S. JAG Corps. ... Vanderbilt University Vanderbilt University is a private university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Law school is the term used in the United States to indicate an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees, mainly teaching using the Socratic method. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis (largest metropolitan area is Nashville) Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ... Progressivism or political progressivism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Corruption Jurisprudence Philosophy of law Law (principle) List of legal abbreviations Legal code Intent Letter versus Spirit Natural Justice Natural law Religious law Witness intimidation Legal research External links Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Law Look up law in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Law, Legal Definitions... Business refers to at least three closely related commercial topics. ... Investment is a term with several closely-related meanings in finance and economics. ...


In 1958, governor of Tennessee Frank G. Clement asked Hooker to become involved in the state's investigation of Raulston Schoolfield, an allegedly corrupt Chattanooga area judge. Based largely on Hooker's findings, the Tennessee House of Representatives voted to impeach Schoolfield. Hooker was then retained to help prosecute Schoolfield before the Tennessee State Senate. (As of 2004, this is the last such event that has occurred in Tennessee.) 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Frank Goad Clement (June 2, 1920–November 4, 1969) served as governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1953 to 1959 and again from 1963 to 1967. ... This article is about a city in the US State of Tennessee. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... The Tennessee State Senate is the upper house of the Tennessee General Assembly, the formal name of the Tennessee state legislature. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Political Career

He married the former Patricia "Tish" Fort, a member of another socially-prominent Nashville family which was associated with the founding of the former National Life and Accident Insurance Company and its subsidiaries, WSM radio and the Grand Ole Opry country music program. He also befriended the powerful Seigenthaler family, who then published the Nashville Tennessean, the most prominent newspaper in Middle Tennessee. This association helped him to meet Robert F. Kennedy, who was then beginning his career as United States Attorney General. Kennedy used Hooker to help with the government's position in the landmark redistricting case, Baker v. Carr. In 1962, both the Seigenthalers and Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver encouraged Hooker to oppose Frank Clement for governor, but he declined to do so at the time. WSM may refer to one of the following: AM radio station WSM in Nashville, Tennessee, USA FM radio station WSM-FM, also in Nashville the World Socialist Movement Winchester Short Magnum, a family of rifle cartridges developed by the U.S. Repeating Arms Company, maker of Winchester rifles. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM Radio in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Country music, formerly called country and western music or country-western, is a popular musical form developed in the southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, spirituals, and the blues. ... The Tennessean is a dominant daily newspaper in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Middle Tennessee is a distinct portion of the state of Tennessee, delineated according to law as well as custom. ... Robert Kennedy . Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Redistricting, known as redistribution in many Commonwealth countries, is the changing of political borders (in many countries, specifically the electoral district/constituency boundaries) usually in response to periodic census results. ... Baker v. ... 1962 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 - August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ...


However, with the support and backing of the Seigenthalers, Hooker decided to enter the 1966 Democratic primary for governor of Tennessee. His opponent was Buford Ellington, a former governor attempting a return to the office who had the strong backing of the incumbent governor, Frank Clement, and the other Nashville newspaper, the Nashville Banner. Supported by some of the more progressive members of the Nashville business community, Hooker was perhaps unprepared for a blistering counterattack which was mounted by Ellington's "Old Guard" supporters. Running fairly well in urban areas, Hooker was swamped in the rural areas of the state. Ellington went on to victory in November without even facing a Republican opponent Рthe last time such an event was to occur in Tennessee to date. 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-B̩del Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... A primary election is one in which a political party selects a candidate for a later election by all registered voters in that jurisdiction (nominating primary). ... Earl Buford Ellington (June 27, 1907 - April 3, 1972), a native of Mississippi, was Governor of Tennessee from 1959 to 1963 and again from 1967 until 1971. ... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... The front page from a 1974 issue of The Nashville Banner. ... The term urban means cities and towns as distinct from rural areas. ... Rural areas are sparsely settled places away from the influence of large cities and towns. ... November is the eleventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with the length of 30 days. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


During this period, Hooker and Tish made a campaign appearance at a Nashville church attended by the very young Oprah Winfrey and her family. Tish, as Oprah recounted later, took the time to speak to the young girl, and told her she was "pretty as a speckled pup." Many years later, Tish was invited to appear on Oprah's television show and Oprah acknowledged how much those kind words had meant to her. Oprah Winfrey, at the start of the 2004-2005 season. ...


During the next four years, Hooker divided his time between two major activities – investments and planning to run for governor again in 1970. Politically, he kept up his connection with Bobby Kennedy and other members of the Kennedy political family, and was devastated when RFK was assassinated in 1968. In investments, he put together a small diversified holding company referred to by some as a "mini-conglomerate", Whale, Inc., and a chain of fried chicken restaurants fronted by the country comedienne Minnie Pearl. His rationale for the chicken restaurants was that just as Pepsi had long made a large amount of money as the primary competitor to Coca-Cola, someone else stood to make a comparable fortune as the primary competitor to Kentucky Fried Chicken. Hooker was also intimately involved around the same time with the Frist family and others in the formation of what became the first major for-profit health care chain, the Hospital Corporation of America. 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy The Kennedy family is a prominent Irish Catholic family in American politics and government descending from the marriage of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. ... Jack Ruby murdered the alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald, in a very public manner. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... A conglomerate is a large company that consists of divisions of seemingly unrelated businesses. ... Binomial name Gallus gallus (Linnaeus, 1758) This article is concerned with chicken as a domesticated fowl; for other uses of the term see chicken (disambiguation). ... Minnie Pearl was the stage name of Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon (October 25, 1912 - March 4, 1996). ... The current Pepsi logo Pepsi or Pepsi-Cola, is a carbonated cola soft drink manufactured by PepsiCo, and the principal rival of Coca-Cola. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... KFC, previously known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a division of Yum! Brands, Inc. ... Bill Frist Dr. William Harrison Frist (born February 22, 1952 in Nashville, Tennessee) is a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee and a cardiac surgeon. ... The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) (NYSE: HCA) is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ...


Hooker won the 1970 Democratic nomination for governor of Tennessee over a host of competitors, most notably the candidate of the "Old Guard", Nashville attorney Stan Snodgrass, who had the endorsement of the Nashville Banner. In the past, this would have almost assured victory in November. But many things had changed in Tennessee in the four years since his loss to Ellington. For one, the Republican Party was benefitting greatly from the Southern strategy of then-President Richard M. Nixon to reach out to rural and working-class urban Southern whites who were disturbed by desegregation and other rapid social changes. Tennessee Republicans, only just over two years from failing to field a gubernatorial candidate, had even managed to organize the Tennessee House of Representatives for the first (and only) time in the 20th century in 1969, and were not about to allow what appeared to them to be a golden opportunity to pass them by. 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... Caucasian is originally a geographical term, meaning relative or pertaining to the Caucasus region of Eastern Europe and West Asia. ... Desegregation is the process of ending racial segregation, most commonly used in reference to the United States. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ...


Events as well as people seemed to conspire against Hooker in the fall of 1970. The Republicans had staged a very hard-fought primary race of their own, but had come out of it largely united behind the candidacy of Memphis dentist Dr. Winfield Dunn, former chairman of the Shelby County Republican Party. Many of Snodgrass' erstwhile supporters, including the Nashville Banner, endorsed Dunn. At the same time, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced an investigation into Hooker, Whale, Inc., and Minnie Pearl's Chicken, the price of which had collapsed from a high of $40 a share to approximately 50 cents amid charges of accounting irregularities and stock price manipulation. City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... X-rays can reveal if a person has cavities Dentistry is the practical application of knowledge of dental science (the science of placement, arrangement, function of teeth) to human beings. ... Bryant Winfield Culberson Dunn (born July 1, 1927) was governor of Tennessee from 1971 to 1975. ... Shelby County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ... Accountancy (British English) or accounting (American English) is the process of maintaining, auditing, and processing financial information for business purposes. ...


Simultaneously, Democratic Senator Albert Gore, Sr. was running an equally hard-fought and ultimately unsuccessful campaign for a fourth term against Chattanooga Congressman William E. Brock. The friendly relationship both Gore and Hooker shared with the Kennedy family became an issue, especially in light of Ted Kennedy's involvement in the Chappaquiddick incident the previous year. Republicans and "Old Guard" detractors alike pilloried the two, leading to a Republican sweep and the first time in the post-Reconstruction era that the Republicans held the Tennessee governorship and both United States Senate seats (although, curiously, they lost control of the state House of Representatives and to date have never regained it). Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Albert Gore Sr. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ... Bill Brock William Emerson Bill Brock III (born November 23, 1930) was a Republican United States Senator from Tennessee from 1971 to 1977. ... Office: Senior Senator, Massachusetts Political party: Democrat Term of office: January 1963 – Present Preceded by: Benjamin A. Smith II Succeeded by: Incumbent (2007) Date of birth: February 22, 1932 Place of birth: Boston, Massachusetts Marriage: (1) Virginia Joan Bennett, divorced (2) Victoria Reggie Kennedy Edward Moore Kennedy, (born February 22... Chappaquiddick Island is a small island off the eastern end of the larger island of Marthas Vineyard. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the breakaway Confederacy were reintegrated into the United States of America. ... A U.S. state is any one of the 50 states (four of which officially favor the term commonwealth) which, together with the District of Columbia, form the United States of America. ... The Tennessee House of Representatives, in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Tennessee, formally called the Tennessee General Assembly. ...


Hooker was devastated both by the defeat and by what he regarded as a betrayal by people he had thought to be friends. He was never convicted of any criminal wrongdoing in the SEC cases, but found his fortune to be gone and his marriage faltering. Common stereotype of a criminal A crime in a broad sense is an act that violates a political or moral law. ...


After Politics

He served as chairman of the STP Corporation from 1973 to 1976, having previously returned to the practice of law and, later, investing again, albeit at first on a greatly reduced scale. He entered the 1976 Democratic Primary for Brock's U.S. Senate seat and was at first perhaps favored to win the nomination, but was defeated by the previously-little-known Jim Sasser for the nomination. (Sasser was well-known by Tennessee Democratic insiders, however, as the manager of Albert Gore, Sr.'s, last, unsuccessful campaign six years earlier. He defeated Brock in November and went on to serve three terms in the Senate.) In retrospect, this was probably Hooker's last serious attempt to gain elective office. During this campaign, in an exchange with Nashville talk show host and then-news anchor Teddy Bart, he made a most memorable reply to a question about abortion and related moral issues: "Come on, Bart! I'm not running for Jesus, I'm running for the Senate." This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... 1973 was a common year starting on Monday. ... 1976 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... James Ralph Sasser James Ralph Jim Sasser (born September 30, 1936) is a former member of the United States Senate, a Democrat who represented Tennessee from 1977 to 1995. ... A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... A news anchor (US,Can. ... This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. ...


After the unsuccessful 1976 race, Hooker again returned to the practice of law and investing. In 1979 he arranged for the sale of The Tennessean to Gannett, which had earlier purchased the Banner but preferred to own morning rather than evening papers. At the same time, his own investment group purchased the Banner from Gannett (the two papers were linked by a joint operating agreement) and became publisher of the very paper that had so tormented him only nine years earlier. In retrospect, he has called this perhaps the greatest single moment of his life. However, Hooker sold his portion of the Banner in 1982 and became chairman for a period of United Press International, the historical but faltering competitor in the wire-service news business to the Associated Press. 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ... The Tennessean is a dominant daily newspaper in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Gannett Company, Inc. ... The Joint Operating Agreement as an agreement between The Seattle Times Company and the New York-based Hearst Corporation, owners of the Seattle Times and Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Seattle P-I). ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... United Press International (UPI) is a global news agency headquartered in the United States filing news in English, Spanish and Arabic. ... News is essentially new information or current events. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ...


Hooker's fortunes seemed to ebb and flow in the 1980s. At one point, he became rather prosperous again. Always something of a flamboyant dresser, he began to appear in public in the old-time flat topped straw hat which was fashionable in the 1930s and has ever since been associated with political campaigns. He promoted a new fast food chain, named for himself, which sold hamburgers from small, drive-by only buildings, operating this venture from 1984 to 1986 before selling it, apparently for a relatively small sum. Several of these outlets were built in the Nashville area and the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, at least, but the venture ultimately was a failure, and Hooker began to live off of the sympathies of friends, and was at one point reputed to be living in his car. He remained friends with many prominent persons, however, including former heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali and H. Ross Perot. Hooker always claimed to have been the first and primary counsellor in Perot's decision to run for United States President in 1992. // Events and trends The 1980s marked an abrupt shift towards more conservative lifestyles after the momentous cultural revolutions which took place in the 1960s and 1970s and the definition of the AIDS virus in 1981. ... // Events and trends The 1930s were spent struggling for a solution to the global depression. ... Fast food is food prepared and served quickly at a fast-food restaurant or shop at low cost. ... 1984 is a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 Armed Forces Amateur Boxing Championships, held in 2003. ... For the 19th century politician Cassius Clay, see Cassius M. Clay Muhammad Ali-Haj (born January 17, 1942 as Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman billionaire from Texas best known as a candidate for President of the United States (in 1992 and 1996). ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At this point, Hooker began to exhibit behaviour that could only be described as bizarre. He began to appear in public in Nashville dressed as Abraham Lincoln, complete with frock coat and "stovepipe" hat and beard, a habit he maintained for several years. He also began to file to run for various political offices including governor, Senator, Congressman, and others, only then to sue all of the other persons running for the office for taking campaign contributions from out of state, which according to his legal theories was illegal, even unconstitutional. (This was litigated to the Supreme Court level and Hooker's views were not upheld.) In 1995 he even sued President Bill Clinton, as well as all of the other presidential candidates, for accepting campaign contributions, which according to his theory were sheer bribery. He sued the Tennessee Supreme Court, saying that their elections under the "modified Missouri Plan" were unconstitutional, eventually forcing them to recuse themselves from their own case and require the empanellment of a special State Supreme Court to hear the charges. (They found nothing wrong with the system). At one point his ability to conduct this sort of litigation on a per se basis was contested when it was revealed that he had failed to maintain the continuing education requirements for maintenance of his law license, a situation that he eventually remedied. Although his later campaigns were basically stunts to draw attention to the amount of money which came into Tennessee politics from out of state and its alleged corrupting influence, he unexpectedly, perhaps even to himself, received the 1998 Democratic nomination for governor. No other prominent Democrat had filed to opposed incumbent Republican governor Don Sundquist, and Hooker defeated a field of other "token" candidates as well as the supposedly "serious" candidate with union backing, Mark Whitaker, who was the selected "sacrifical lamb" of the party leadership (and who was in 2002 to run for state representative as a Republican). Order: 16th President Vice President: Hannibal Hamlin (1861-1865); Andrew Johnson (1865) Term of office: March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865 Preceded by: James Buchanan Succeeded by: Andrew Johnson Date of birth: February 12, 1809 Place of birth: Hardin County, Kentucky (now in LaRue County) Date of death: April 15... Constitutionality is the status of a law, procedure, or act being in accordance with the laws or guidelines contained in a constitution. ... The supreme court in some countries, provinces, and states, is the highest court in that jurisdiction and functions as a court of last resort whose rulings cannot be appealed. ... 1995 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic William Jefferson Clinton (born... Bribery is the practice of offering a professional or an authority person money or other favours in order to circumvent ethics or other rules in a variety of situations. ... The Tennessee Supreme Court is the highest appellate court of the State of Tennessee. ... Also known as the merit plan, the Missouri Plan (originally the Missouri Nonpartisan Court Plan) is a method for the nonpartisan selection of judges currently used in 11 U.S. states. ... Continuing education, in its most general definition, is education intended for adult learners, especially for those beyond traditional undergraduate college or university age. ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Donald Kenneth Sundquist (born March 15, 1936) was Governor of Tennessee from 1995 to 2003. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Hooker won the nomination based on tremendous name recognition among older Democrats, who are in Tennessee generally the most reliable primary voters. Ironically, he ran the best in the rural areas which had always been his downfall in the past, and with urban blacks, who had always provided him with a core support group. While not formally disavowing him, the regular Democratic Party organization did almost nothing to promote his candidacy, and as Hooker had disavowed the formal fundraising process as unethical and immoral and at this point utterly lacked his own resources sufficient to run a realistic campaign, so he received only about 30% of the vote in the November general election, the lowest mark for any Democratic nominee for a statewide office in Tennessee since the restoration of civil rights to former Confederate sympathizers after the end of the Civil War. Hooker remains a gadfly, running for Congress in 2002 and again suing all his opponents, and most recently for Chancery Court judge in 2004 as an Independent, receiving approximately 13% of the vote. African Americans, also known as Afro-Americans or black Americans, are an ethnic group in the United States of America whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Sub-Saharan and West Africa. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... For other meanings of confederate and confederacy, see confederacy (disambiguation) National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Largest... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... A judge or justice is an appointed or elected official who presides over a court. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Eccentricities in the Courtroom

In November 2004 Hooker was ordered to pay a $4500 fine by Nashville judge Walter Kurtz. This was based on Hooker's persistent filing of lawsuits. Hooker's most recent legal theory, after the courts dismissed his claims based on the purported unconstitutionality of out of state money in the political process, is aimed at political fundraisers. Hooker cites Article X, Section 3 of the Tennessee state constitution, which states "Any elector who shall receive any gift or reward for his vote, in meat, drink, money, or otherwise, shall suffer punishment as the laws shall direct. And any person who shall directly or indirectly give, promise, or bestow any such reward to be elected, shall thereby be rendered incapable, for six years, to serve in the office for which he shall be elected, and be subject to further punishment as the Legislature shall direct." He says the food and beverages traditionally served at political fundraisers are in direct violation of this article. (Fundraisers have been found to be constitutionally permissible in Tennessee because their intent is to serve as an inducement to donate money, on the grounds that the votes of people who attend such an event are not being purchased in any way, as they are assumed to be assured.) All future lawsuits filed by Hooker for the next five years relating to political fundraising are to be screened by a special master as well according to Kurtz's order. 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: November 2004 in sports November 2004 in science Deaths in November • 30 Pierre Berton • 29 John Drew Barrymore • 26 Bill Alley • 24 Arthur Hailey • 23 Rafael Eitan • 18 Bobby Frank Cherry • 16 John Morgan • 13... In the context of the United States of America, a state constitution is the governing document of a U.S. state, comparable to the U.S. Constitution which is the governing document of the United States. ... In law, a special master is an authority appointed by a judge to make sure that judicial orders are actually followed. ...


Hooker is appealing, in part on the grounds that, as someone subject to periodic reelection, Kurtz is an interested party in the suit and therefore incompetent to rule on it. (Just which judicial authority in Tennessee would be competent to hear Hooker's arguments in this event is problematic; all state judges in Tennessee are subjected to periodic reviews by the voters in one manner or another.) The state attorney general's office had asked Kurtz to sanction Hooker after Hooker sued four appelate and one trial level judge, a judge who had previously sanctioned him for filing frivolous lawsuits and the appelate judge which upheld his ruling. Kurtz later moved to disbar Hooker, on grounds that past sanctions had not deterred his persistent filing of frivolous lawsuits. In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ...


Hooker remains a minor, tragicomic figure on the Nashville scene. He enjoys, many would say craves, attention and has been a frequent guest on Teddy Bart's radio talk show. (He and Bart are close friends. In fact, Hooker's brief second marriage was to Bart's former receptionist.) In an interview with Bart in the spring of 1999, he gave this remarkable summation of his career, which would in many ways perhaps serve him well as an epitaph: "You know, Teddy Bart, I've had a remarkable life. I was born to a prominent family, and am the lineal descendant of the first Chief Justice of the United States and author of the Federalist Papers, and another man whose female followers have since given their name to a whole way of life. I befriended a man who should have been President of the United States, Bobby Kennedy, and twice been the Democratic nominee for Governor of Tennessee. I've shared the love of two beautiful women, made and lost several fortunes, and most of all, I'm still in love with the sound of my own voice." A talk show (U.S.) or chat show (Brit. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... An epitaph (literally: on the grave in ancient Greek) is text honoring the dead, most commonly inscribed on a tombstone or plaque. ... Title page of an early Federalist compilation. ...


External links

  • John Jay Hooker's blog
  • Short Hooker biography from Middle Tennessee State University site
  • Tish Hooker on Oprah
  • Kurtz moves to disbar Hooker

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John Lee Hooker, MP3 Music Download at eMusic (1034 words)
Hooker heard Memphis calling while he was still in his teens, but he couldn't gain much of a foothold there.
Hooker became the point man for the growing Detroit blues scene during this incredibly prolific period, recruiting guitarist Eddie Kirkland as his frequent duet partner while still recording for Modern.
Once again, Hooker was resting on his laurels by allowing his guests to wrest much of the spotlight away from him on his own album, but by then, he'd earned it.
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