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Encyclopedia > John J. Crittenden

John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786July 26, 1863) was an American statesman. P-domain, natl portrait gallery, us pol leader http://www. ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


He was born near Versailles, Kentucky, and attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia, and was graduated from William and Mary College in 1806. Thereafter he studied law and was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Woodford County, Kentucky in 1807. Versailles is a city located in Woodford County, Kentucky. ... Washington College is a private, selective, independent liberal arts college located on a 112 acre (453,000 m²) campus in Chestertown, Maryland on the Delmarva Peninsula. ... Washington and Lee University is a private liberal arts college in Lexington, Rockbridge County, Virginia, located very close to Virginia Military Institute. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the state of Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is a public, liberal-arts university located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Law topics overview List of areas of law List of legal topics List of legal terms List of jurists List of legal abbreviations List of case law lists List of law firms Further reading Cheyenne Way: Conflict & Case Law in Primitive Jurisprudence, Karl N. Llewellyn and E. Adamson Hoebel, University... A bar association is a body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ... Woodford County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ...


He was attorney general of Illinois Territory from 1809-1810; served in the War of 1812 as an aide to the governor; and resumed the practice of law in Russellville, Kentucky after the end of the war. In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Categories: Stub | Illinois history | U.S. historical regions and territories ... This page refers to the war between the United States of America and Great Britain. ... Russellville is a city located in Logan County, Kentucky. ...


He served in the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1811 to 1817, and served as Speaker of the House during his last term in that body. He was elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1819, when he resigned. During his tenure in the 15th Congress he served as chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Judiciary. Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... (Redirected from 15th Congress) Fifteenth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ...


After leaving Congress he moved to Frankfort, Kentucky. He briefly rejoined the Kentucky House in 1825, and then 1829 to 1832. He appointed and was confirmed as United States district attorney in 1827, but was removed by President Andrew Jackson in 1829; nominated in 1828 by President John Quincy Adams as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, but was not confirmed by the Senate; again elected to the United States Senate as a Whig and served from March 4, 1835, to March 3, 1841. He was appointed Attorney General of the United States by President William Henry Harrison from March to September 1841; appointed and subsequently elected to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Henry Clay and served from March 31, 1842, to June 12, 1848, when he resigned. During this period (27th Congress and 28th Congress) he served on the U.S. Senate Committee on Military Affairs. From 1848 to 1850 he was the Governor of Kentucky and then resigned to again become Attorney General, this time appointed by Millard Fillmore. He served in that position from 1850 to 1853 and then was again elected to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1855, to March 3, 1861. During that period (36th Congress) he was the chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Revolutionary Claims. Crittenden was torn by loyalties during the US Civil War, with one son leaving to join the Union and the other enlisting with the Confederate States of America. He was elected as a Unionist to the 37th Congress (March 4, 1861March 3, 1863). He was a candidate for reelection to that office at the time of his death. He died in Frankfort, Kentucky and is interred at the State Cemetery there. Frankfort is the capital of Kentucky, a state of the United States of America. ... United States Attorneys represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth (1825-1829) President of the United States. ... Associate Justices of the United States Supreme Court are the members of that court other than the Chief Justice. ... The United States Whig Party was a political party of the United States. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1835 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... take you to calendar). ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Millard Fillmore (January 7, 1800 – March 8, 1874) was the thirteenth President of the United States, serving from 1850 until 1853, and the last member of the Whig Party to hold the nations highest office. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans February 4, 1861 until captured... The Constitutional Union Party was a political party in the United States created in 1860. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ...


His son, George Bibb Crittenden (1812-1880), soldier, was born in Russellville, Kentucky, on 20 March 1812, and graduated at West Point in 1832, but resigned his commission in 1833. He re-entered the army as a captain of mounted rifles in the Mexican War, served with distinction, and was breveted major for bravery at Contreras and Churubusco. After the war he remained in the army, and in 1856 attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel. In June 1861 he resigned, and entered the service of the Confederacy. He was commissioned major-general and given a command in southeast Kentucky and Tennessee, but after the defeat of his forces by Gen. George H. Thomas at the Battle of Mill Springs (January 19, 1862), he was censured and gave up his command. He served subsequently as a volunteer aide on the staff of Gen. John S. Williams. From 1867 to 1871 he was state librarian of Kentucky. He died at Danville, Kentucky, on 27 November 1880. 1812 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... A soldier is a person who has enlisted with, or has been conscripted into, the armed forces of a sovereign country and has undergone training and received equipment (such as a uniform and weapon) to defend that country or its interests. ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... The Mexican-American War was a war fought between the United States and Mexico between 1846 and 1848. ... Magdalena Contreras is one of the 16 delegaciones (boroughs) into which Mexicos Federal District is divided. ... Churubusco is a neighbourhood of Mexico City. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Official languages English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Senators Mitch McConnell (R) Jim Bunning (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 37th 104,749 km² 1. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... General George Henry Thomas (July 31, 1816 - March 28, 1870), Northern general during the American Civil War, was born in Southampton County, Virginia. ... Battle of Mill Springs Conflict American Civil War Date January 19, 1862 Place Pulaski County and Wayne County, Kentucky Result Union victory The Battle of Mill Springs, also known as Logans Cross Roads was a decisive Union victory that made a Union invasion into Tennessee possible. ... January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John Sharp Williams (July 30, 1854 - September 27, 1932) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party from the 1890s through the 1920s, and served as the Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives from 1903 to 1908. ... The Librarian, a 1556 painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo A librarian is a person who develops procedures for organizing information and provides services that assist and instruct people in the most efficient ways to identify and access any needed information or information resource (article, book, magazine, etc. ... Danville is a city located in Boyle County, Kentucky. ...


Another son, Thomas Leonidas Crittenden (1815-1893), soldier, was also born at Russeilville, Kentucky. He studied law, and practised with his father, and in 1842 became commonwealth's attorney. He served in the Mexican War as a lieutenant-colonel of Kentucky volunteers, and was an aide on Gen. Zachary Taylor's staff at the Battle of Buena Vista. From 1849 to 1853 he was United States consul at Liverpool, England. Like his father, he was a strong Union man, and in September 1861 he was commissioned by President Lincoln a brigadier-general of volunteers. He commanded a division at the Battle of Shiloh, for gallantry in which battle he was promoted major-general in July 1862. He was in command of a corps in the army of the Ohio under Gen. D. C. Buell, and took part in the battles of Stone River and Chickamauga. Subsequently he served in the Virginia campaign of 1864. He resigned his commission in December 1864, but in July 1866 entered the regular army with the rank of colonel of infantry, receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1867, served on the frontier and in several Indian wars, and retired in 1881. He died on 23 October 1893. The Battle of New Orleans 1815 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1893 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Zachary Taylor (November 24, 1784 – July 9, 1850), also known as Old Rough and Ready, was the twelfth President of the United States, serving from 1849 to 1850. ... The Battle of Buena Vista was a land battle of the Mexican-American War fought on 23 February 1847 in Buena Vista, Coahuila, seven miles (12 km) south of Saltillo, in northern Mexico. ... This article is about the city in England. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809–April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the American Civil War, fought April 6–7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... Battle of Stones River / Battle of Murfreesboro II Conflict American Civil War Date December 31, 1862 - January 2, 1863 Place Murfreesboro, Tennessee Result Both sides claim victory, but the Confederate Army withdraws The Battle of Stones River or Murfreesboro II, was a battle fought in the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Chickamauga, fought September 18–20, 1863, marked the end of a Union offensive in south-central Tennessee and northwestern Georgia called the Chickamauga Campaign. ... Infantry of the 36th Ulster Division, in the First World War Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot, mainly with small arms and operate within organized military units. ...


See also

Preceded by:
Henry D. Gilpin
United States Attorney General
1841
Succeeded by:
Hugh S. Legare
Preceded by:
Reverdy Johnson
United States Attorney General
1850–1853
Succeeded by:
Caleb Cushing
Preceded by:
William Owsley
Governor of Kentucky
1848–1850
Succeeded by:
John L. Helm
United States Attorneys General Seal of the United States Department of Justice
Randolph | Bradford | Lee | Lincoln | R Smith | Breckinridge | Rodney | Pinkney | Rush | Wirt | Berrien | Taney | Butler | Grundy | Gilpin | Crittenden | Legaré | Nelson | Mason | Clifford | Toucey | Johnson | Crittenden | Cushing | Black | Stanton | Speed | Stanberry | Evarts | Hoar | Akerman | Williams | Pierrepont | Taft | Devens | MacVeagh | Brewster | Garland | Miller | Olney | Harmon | McKenna | Griggs | Knox | Moody | Bonaparte | Wickersham | McReynolds | Gregory | Palmer | Daugherty | Stone | Sargent | W Mitchell | Cummings | Murphy | Jackson | Biddle | T Clark | McGrath | McGranery | Brownell | Rogers | Kennedy | Katzenbach | R Clark | J Mitchell | Kleindienst | Richardson | Saxbe | Levi | Bell | Civiletti | W Smith | Meese | Thornburgh | Barr | Reno | Ashcroft | Gonzales


The Crittenden Compromise (December 18, 1860) was an unsuccessful proposal by Kentucky Senator John J. Crittenden to resolve the U.S. secession crisis of 1860–1861 by addressing the concerns that led the states in the Lower South of the United States to contemplate secession. ... Henry Dilworth Gilpin (April 14, 1801–January 29, 1860) was an American lawyer and statesman of American Quaker extraction who served as Attorney General of the United States. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Hugh Swinton Legaré (January 2, 1797–June 20, 1843) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796–February 10, 1876) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Caleb Cushing (January 17, 1800–January 2, 1879) was an American statesman and diplomat who served as a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. ... William Owsley (1782 – December 1862) was an American politician and jurist. ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (1802-1867) John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Seal of the United States Department of Justice. ... [[Image: Edmund Jennings Randolph aka evan(August 10, 1753 – September 12, 1813) was an American attorney, Governor of Virginia, Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. ... William Bradford (September 14, 1755–August 23, 1795) was a lawyer and judge from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the second United States Attorney General in 1794-1795. ... Charles Lee (1758 - June 24, 1815) was United States Attorney General from 1795 _ 1801. ... Levi Lincoln, Sr. ... Robert Smith (November 3, 1757–November 26, 1842) was the second United States Secretary of the Navy from 1801 to 1809 and the sixth United States Secretary of State from 1809 to 1811. ... John Breckinridge served many positions in government throughout his life. ... Caesar Augustus Rodney (January 4, 1772 _ June 10, 1824) was the United States Attorney General from 1807 to 1811, a U.S. Senator from Delaware from 1822 to 1823, and the U.S. Minister to Argentina from 1823 until his death in Buenos Aires in 1824. ... William Pinkney William Pinkney (March 17, 1764–February 25, 1822) was an American statesman and diplomat, and the seventh U.S. Attorney General. ... Richard Rush Richard Rush (August 29, 1780–July 30, 1859) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772–February 18, 1834) was a U.S. statesman and is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... John MacPherson Berrien (August 23, 1781–January 1, 1856) of Georgia was a United States Senator and Andrew Jacksons Attorney General. ... Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States from 1836 until his death in 1864. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler (December 17, 1795–November 8, 1858) was a lawyer, legislator and Attorney General of the United States. ... Felix Grundy (September 11, 1777–December 19, 1840) was a U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator from Tennessee who also served as the 13th Attorney General of the United States. ... Henry Dilworth Gilpin (April 14, 1801–January 29, 1860) was an American lawyer and statesman of American Quaker extraction who served as Attorney General of the United States. ... Hugh Swinton Legaré (January 2, 1797–June 20, 1843) was an American lawyer and politician. ... John Nelson (1794 - 1860) was a U.S. lawyer. ... John Young Mason (April 18, 1799–October 3, 1859) was an American politician and diplomat. ... Nathan Clifford (August 18, 1803–July 25, 1881) was an American statesman, diplomat and jurist. ... Isaac Toucey (November 15, 1792–July 30, 1869) was an American statesman who served as a U.S. Senator, Secretary of the Navy, Attorney General of the United States and Governor of Connecticut. ... Reverdy Johnson (May 21, 1796–February 10, 1876) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Caleb Cushing (January 17, 1800–January 2, 1879) was an American statesman and diplomat who served as a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. ... Jeremiah Sullivan Black (January 10, 1810–August 19, 1883) was an American statesman and lawyer. ... Edwin M. Stanton Edwin McMasters Stanton (December 19, 1814 – December 24, 1869), was an American lawyer, politician and Secretary of War through most of the American Civil War and in the Reconstruction era. ... James Speed (March 11, 1812–June 25, 1887) was a American lawyer, politician and professor. ... Henry Stanberry (February 20, 1803–June 26, 1881) was an American lawyer and Presidential Cabinet member. ... Photograph of U.S. Secretary of State William M. Evarts William Maxwell Evarts (February 6, 1818–February 28, 1901) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar (February 21, 1816–January 31, 1895) was an American politician. ... Amos Tappan Akerman (February 23, 1821 - December 21, 1880) served as United States Attorney General under President Ulysses S. Grant from 1870-1872. ... George Henry Williams (March 23, 1823–April 4, 1910) was an American judge and statesman. ... Edwards Pierrepont (March 4, 1817–March 6, 1892) was an American statesman, jurist and lawyer. ... Alphonso Taft (November 5, 1810–May 21, 1891) was the Attorney General and Secretary of War under President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Charles Devens (April 4, 1820–January 7, 1891) was an American lawyer, jurist and statesman. ... Isaac Wayne MacVeagh (April 19, 1833–January 11, 1917) was an American politician and diplomat. ... Benjamin Harris Brewster (October 13, 1816–April 4, 1888) was an American attorney and Cabinet secretary. ... Augustus Hill Garland (June 11, 1832 - January 26, 1899) was an Attorney General of the United States, Democratic United States Senator, Confederate States Senator, Confederate States Representative, and Governor of the State of Arkansas. ... William Henry Harrison Miller (September 6, 1840&ndsah;May 25, 1917) was an American lawyer and Attorney General of the United States. ... Richard Olney (September 15, 1835–April 8, 1917) was an American statesman. ... Judson Harmon (February 3, 1846 - February 22, 1927) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Joseph McKenna (August 10, 1843–November 21, 1926) was an American politician who served in all three branches of the U.S. federal government, as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives, as U.S. Attorney General and as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. ... John William Griggs (July 10, 1849–November 28, 1927) was an American politician. ... Philander C. Knox Philander Chase Knox (May 6, 1853–October 12, 1921) was an American lawyer and politician who served as Attorney General and U.S. Senator and was Secretary of State from 1909-1913. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | U.S. Attorneys General | U.S. Secretaries of the Navy | Members of the U.S. House of Representatives | American lawyers | 1853 births | 1917 deaths ... Charles Joseph Bonaparte (June 9, 1851–June 28, 1921) was a grandson of Jérôme Bonaparte (the youngest brother of the French emperor Napoleon I), and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... George Woodward Wickersham (September 19, 1858–January 26, 1936) was an American lawyer and Presidential Cabinet Secretary. ... Justice McReynolds, c. ... Thomas Watt Gregory (November 6, 1861–February 26, 1933) was an American attorney and Cabinet Secretary. ... Alexander Mitchell Palmer (May 4, 1872 - May 11, 1936) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Harry Micajah Daugherty (January 26, 1860–October 12, 1941) (daw-GER-tee) was an American politician. ... Harlan Fiske Stone (October 11, 1872 – April 22, 1946) was an American lawyer and jurist who served as the dean of Columbia Law School, Attorney General of the United States, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and later Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Garibaldi Sargent (October 13, 1860–March 5, 1939) was an American lawyer and statesman. ... William DeWitt Mitchell (September 9, 1874–August 24, 1955) was U.S. Attorney General for the entirety of Herbert Hoovers Presidency. ... Homer Stille Cummings (1870 - 1956) was a U.S. political figure. ... William Francis Murphy culminated his political career as a United States Supreme Court Associate Justice. ... Justice Jackson Robert Houghwout Jackson (February 13, 1892 – October 9, 1954) was United States Attorney General (1940 - 1941) and an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court (1941 - 1954). ... The Nuremberg judges, left to right: John Parker, Francis Biddle, Alexander Volchkov, Iona Nikitchenko, Geoffrey Lawrence, Norman Birkett Francis Beverley Biddle (May 9, 1886–October 4, 1968) was an American lawyer and judge who is most famous as the primary American judge during the Nuremberg trials after World War II... Tom Campbell Clark (September 23, 1899 in Dallas, Texas –June 13, 1977) was United States Attorney General from 1945-1949 and an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1949-1967). ... McGrath (middle left) with Theodore Francis Green (right) and Harry S. Truman (far right). ... James Patrick McGranery (July 8, 1895–December 23, 1962) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Herbert Brownell, Jr. ... William Pierce Rogers (June 23, 1913 – January 2, 2001) was an American politician, who served as a Cabinet officer in the administrations of two U.S. Presidents in the third quarter of the 20th century. ... For the New Zealand cricketer, see Robert Kennedy (cricketer). ... Nicholas deBelleville Katzenbach (born January 17, 1922) was a American lawyer and United States Attorney General. ... Attorney General Clark & President Lyndon B. Johnson. ... Mitchell (far left) meeting with Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover and John Ehrlichman on May 26, 1971. ... Richard Gordon Kleindienst (August 5, 1923–February 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Elliot Lee Richardson Elliot Lee Richardson (July 20, 1920 – December 31, 1999) was an American lawyer and politician who was a member of the cabinet of President Richard Nixon, but he managed to avoid being tainted by the Watergate Scandal. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... Edward H. Levi Edward Hirsch Levi (June 26, 1911–March 7, 2000) was an American academic leader, scholar and statesman. ... Griffin Boyette Bell (born October 31, 1918) is an American lawyer and former Presidential Cabinet member. ... Benjamin Richard Civiletti (born July 17, 1935) served as the United States Attorney General during the Carter administration, from 1979 to 1981. ... William French Smith (August 26, 1917–October 29, 1990) was an American lawyer and the 74th Attorney General of the United States. ... Edwin Meese III Edwin Ed Meese III (born December 2, 1931 in Oakland, California) served as the seventy-fifth Attorney General of the United States (1985-1988). ... Categories: People stubs | 1932 births | U.S. Attorneys General | Governors of Pennsylvania ... William P. Barr William Pelham Barr (born May 23, 1950) is an American attorney who served as the 77th Attorney General of the United States. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the 78th Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001), and was the first (and, so far, only) woman to hold that post. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) was the 79th Attorney General of the United States. ... Alberto R. Gonzales (born August 4, 1955 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is the current Attorney General of the United States, becoming the first Hispanic to serve in the position. ...

Governors of Kentucky
Shelby | Garrard | Greenup | Scott | Shelby | Madison | Slaughter | Adair | Desha | Metcalfe | J. Breathitt | J. Morehead | Clark | Wickliffe | Letcher | Owsley | Crittenden | Helm | Powell | C. Morehead | Magoffin | Robinson | Bramlette | Helm | Stevenson | Leslie | McCreary | Blackburn | Knott | Buckner | Brown | Bradley | Taylor | Goebel | Beckham | Willson | McCreary | Stanley | Black | Morrow | Fields | Sampson | Laffoon | Chandler | Johnson | Willis | Clements | Wetherby | Chandler | Combs | E. Breathitt | Nunn | Ford | Carroll | Brown, Jr. | Collins | Wilkinson | Jones | Patton | Fletcher

This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: | | ... State Flag of Kentucky Ratio 10:19 491 × 260 pixels 7518 bytes File links The following pages link to this file: Kentucky Jim Bunning Mitch McConnell Ed Whitfield Ron Lewis Anne Northup Hal Rogers Flags of the U.S. states Flag of Kentucky Ben Chandler 2004 Little League World Series... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... James Garrard was the Governor of Kentucky from 1796 to 1804. ... Christopher Greenup Christopher Greenup (1750–April 27, 1818) was an American lawyer and politician from Frankfort, Kentucky. ... Charles Scott was the Governor of Kentucky from 1808 to 1812. ... Isaac Shelby Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750-July 18, 1826) was an officer in the American Revolutionary War and the first Governor of Kentucky, serving from 1792 to 1796 and from 1812 to 1816. ... George Madison was the Governor of Kentucky in 1816. ... John Adair John Adair (January 9, 1757 – May 19, 1840) was an American pioneer, soldier and statesman of Mercer County, Kentucky. ... John Breathitt (1786–1834) was a 19th century politician who served as the Governor of Kentucky from 1832–1834, dying in office. ... Charles A. Wickliffe Charles Anderson Wickliffe, politician, born in Bardstown, Kentucky, 8 June 1788; died in Ilchester in Howard County, Maryland, 31 October 1869. ... William Owsley (1782 – December 1862) was an American politician and jurist. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (1802-1867) John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... Lazarus W. Powell was the Governor of Kentucky from 1851 to 1855, and later a United States Senator from Kentucky. ... Beriah Magoffin was the Governor of Kentucky from 1859 to 1862. ... John LaRue Helm John LaRue Helm (1802-1867) John LaRue Helm (July 4, 1802–September 8, 1867) was one of the most illustrious sons of Elizabethtown and Hardin County. ... John White Stevenson (2 May 1812 - 10 August 1886) succeeded Governor John Helm, who died while in office in 1867. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Luke p. ... James Proctor Knott (1830 - June 18, 1911) was the Attorney General of Missouri at the outset of the American Civil War and Governor of Kentucky from 1883 to 1887. ... Simon Bolivar Buckner, Sr. ... William Goebel William J. Goebel (January 4, 1856–February 3, 1900) was an American politician who served as Governor of Kentucky for a few days in 1900. ... John Crepps Wickliffe Beckham (August 5, 1869 - January 9, 1940) served as both Governor of Kentucky and in the United States Senate. ... James B. McCreary McCreary ( July 8, 1838-Oct. ... Augustus Owsley Stanley (May 21, 1867 - August 12, 1958) was governor of Kentucky from 1915 to 1918. ... Ruby Laffoon (15th January, 1869 - 01 March 1941) was a Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1931 - 1935. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Keen Johnson (January 12, 1896 - February 7, 1970) served as Governor of Kentucky 1939-1943. ... Earle Chester Clements (October 22, 1896 - March 12, 1985) served as Governor of Kentucky and as a member of the United States Senate from Kentucky. ... Albert Chandler Albert Benjamin Chandler I (commonly known as A. B. Happy Chandler) (July 14, 1898–June 15, 1991) was a governor of Kentucky, a U.S. Senator and Baseball Commissioner. ... Bert T. Combs (August 13, 1911-December 4, 1991),born in Clay County, Kentucky, was the Democratic Governor of Kentucky from 1959 through 1963. ... Edward Thompson Ned Breathitt Jr. ... Louie Broady Nunn Governor of Kentucky 1967-1971 b. ... Wendell Hampton Ford (born September 8, 1924) is an American politician from Kentucky who belongs to the Democratic Party. ... Julian Morton Carroll (born April 16, 1931) was Governor of the U.S. state of Kentucky from 1974 to 1979 as a Democrat. ... John Y. Brown, Jr. ... Martha Layne Collins Martha Layne Collins (born December 7, 1936 in Bagdad, Kentucky) was Governor of the U.S. State of Kentucky from 1983 through 1987; she is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Wallace G. Wilkinson (May 23, 1928–July 5, 2002) was a Kentucky businessman who made a fortune with college bookstores. ... Brereton Jones Brereton Chandler Jones (born June 27, 1939) is an American political figure. ... Paul E. Patton Paul E. Patton (born May 26, 1937) served as Democratic governor of Kentucky from 1995 to 2003. ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since 2003. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
John J. Crittenden (633 words)
John J. Crittenden was born in Kentucky in 1787, his father having emigrated there following the American Revolution.
While Crittenden did not accept a cabinet post in the Taylor ad ministration, he agreed to serve Taylor's successor, Millard Fillmore, as attorney general, holding the post until the end of Fillmore's term.
Kentucky ultimately refused to join the Confederacy, and Crittenden was elected to the Congress, where he introduc ed resolutions to the effect that the war was to preserve the Union, not to interfere with slavery or to subjugate the South.
John J. Crittenden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (425 words)
John Jordan Crittenden (September 10, 1786–July 26, 1863) was an American statesman.
He was born near Versailles, Kentucky, and attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) in Lexington, Virginia, and was graduated from William and Mary College in 1806.
Crittenden was torn by loyalties during the US Civil War, with one son leaving to join the Union and the other enlisting with the Confederacy States of America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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