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Encyclopedia > John Hunt Morgan
Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan
Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan

John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War. He led 2,460 troops in a daring raid, called Morgan's Raid, racing past Union lines into Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio in July 1863. This was the farthest north any uniformed Confederate troops penetrated during the war. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... Opening of the Stockton and Darlington Railway 1825 (MDCCCXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven Southern states seceded from the United States (four more states soon followed). ... Soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback in combat are commonly known as cavalry (from French cavalerie). ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan Morgans Raid was a highly publicized incursion by Confederate cavalry into the Northern states of Indiana and Ohio during the American Civil War. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ...

Contents

Early life and career

John Hunt Morgan was born in Huntsville, Alabama, the eldest of ten children of Calvin and Henrietta Hunt Morgan, and uncle of geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan. He was the grandson of John Wesley Hunt, an early founder of Lexington, Kentucky, and one of the first millionaires west of the Allegheny Mountains. Morgan's father lost his Huntsville home in 1831 due to an inability to pay the property taxes after the failure of his pharmacy. The family moved to Lexington so that Calvin could run one of Hunt's sprawling farms. John attended Transylvania College for two years before being suspended in June of 1844 for dueling with a fraternity brother. In 1846, Morgan joined the Freemasons, as had his father before him. Nickname: Rocket City Watercress Capital of the World Coordinates: Country United States State Alabama County Madison, Limestone Mayor Loretta Spencer Area    - City 174. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Thomas Hunt Morgan (September 25, 1866 – December 4, 1945) was an American geneticist and embryologist. ... John Wesley Hunt (1773-1849) was a prominent businessman and early civic leader in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Nickname: Athens of the West Horse Capital of the World Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area    - City 739. ... A mansion on Diamond Head Road in Honolulu near Diamond Head State Park. ... The Allegheny Mountain Range (also spelled Alleghany and Allegany) -- informally, the Alleghenies -- is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range of the eastern United States. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name Transylvania, see Transylvania (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Duels (band). ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Delta Sigma Phi, Rotary International, Optimist International, Ordo Templi Orientis or the Shriners. ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ...


Enlisting in the U.S. Army, he served as a cavalry private in the Mexican-American War, including the Battle of Buena Vista. Returning to Kentucky after the conflict ended, he became a hemp manufacturer and eventually took over his grandfather's prosperous mercantile business. In 1848, he married Rebecca Gratz Bruce, the 18-year-old sister of Morgan's business partner. Morgan, still interested in a military career, raised an artillery company in 1852 in the state militia, which was disbanded two years later. The United States Army is one of the armed forces of the United States and has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia Strength 7,000 - 43,000 18,000 - 40,000 Casualties KIA: 1,733 Total dead: 13,283 Wounded: 4,152 25,000 killed or wounded (Mexican government... The Battle of Buena Vista was a land battle of the Mexican-American War fought on 23 February 1847 in Buena Vista, Coahuila, seven miles (12 km) south of Saltillo, in northern Mexico. ... U.S. Marihuana production permit, from the film Hemp for Victory. ... Lexington Minuteman representing militia minuteman John Parker Militia is the activity of one or more citizens organized to provide defense or paramilitary service, or those engaged in such activity. ...


In 1853, the Morgans had a stillborn son. Becky Morgan contracted septic thrombophlebitis, an infection of a blood clot in a vein, which eventually led to an amputation. Relations with his wife's family suffered over differing views of slavery and with her health issues. In 1857, Morgan raised an independent infantry company known as the "Lexington Rifles," and spent much of his free time drilling with them. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into deep vein thrombosis. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... Infantry of the Royal Irish Rifles during the Battle of the Somme in World War I. Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot with small arms in organized military units, though they may be transported to the battlefield by horses, ships, automobiles, skis, or other means. ...


Civil War

An invalid, Becky Morgan died July 21, 1861. In September, Captain Morgan and his militiamen joined the Confederate States Army. He soon became the colonel of the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry. During operations near Selma, Alabama, in August 1862, Morgan's partisans killed a wounded Union general, Robert L. McCook, who was lying in an ambulance. The incident was widely described as "murder" in Northern newspapers and brought Morgan's reputation under question.[1] Pediatric polysomnography patient Childrens Hospital (Saint Louis), 2006 A patient or invalid is any person who receives medical attention, care, or treatment. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar) // January 1 - Benito Juárez captures Mexico City January 2 - Friedrich Wilhelm IV of Prussia dies and is succeeded by... Captain is a nautical term, an organizational title, and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was formed in February 1861 to defend the Confederate States of America, which had itself been formed that same year when seven Southern states seceded from the United States (four more states soon followed). ... Colonel (IPA: or ) is a military rank of a commissioned officer, with the corresponding ranks existing in nearly every country in the world. ... Selma is a city in Alabama located on the banks of the Alabama River in Dallas County, Alabama, of which it is the county seat. ... Look up Partisan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Robert Latimer McCook (December 28, 1827 – August 6, 1862) was a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War who was killed by Confederate partisans in Alabama. ...


He was named a brigadier general (his highest rank) on December 11, 1862. He received the thanks of the Confederate Congress for his raids on the supply lines of Union Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans in December and January, most notably his victory at the Battle of Hartsville on December 7. Also that December, Morgan married Martha "Mattie" Ready, the daughter of Tennessee United States Representative Charles Ready and a cousin of William T. Haskell, another U.S. representative from Tennessee. A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... December 11 is the 345th day (346th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Confederate Congress was the legislative body of the Confederate States of America, existing during the American Civil War between 1861 and 1865. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... William Starke Rosecrans (September 6, 1819 – March 11, 1898) was an inventor, coal-oil company executive, diplomat, politician, and U.S. Army officer. ... The Battle of Hartsville was fought on December 7, 1862, in central Tennessee at the opening of the Stones River Campaign the American Civil War. ... December 7 is the 341st day (342nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Charles Ready was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for Tennessees 5th congressional district. ... For other uses, see Cousin (disambiguation). ... William T. Haskell was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives for Tennessees 11th congressional district. ...


Hoping to divert Union troops and resources in conjunction with the twin Confederate operations of Vicksburg and the Battle of Gettysburg in the summer of 1863, Morgan set off on his operation, which would become known as the Great Raid of 1863 by Confederates, or derisively as the "Calico Raid" by Federals. After many skirmishes and battles during which he captured and paroled thousands of Union soldiers, Morgan's Raid almost ended on July 19, 1863, at Buffington Island in Ohio, when approximately 700 of his men were captured while trying to cross the Ohio River into West Virginia. (Less than 200 succeeded in making the crossing.) Most of the raiders captured that day spent the rest of the war in the infamous Camp Douglas Prisoner of War camp in Chicago, which had a very high death rate. Near Salineville, Ohio, on July 26, exhausted, hungry and saddlesore, Morgan and his remaining troops were forced to surrender to pursuing Union forces. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant John C. Pemberton Strength Army of the Tennessee Army of Vicksburg Casualties 10,142 9,091 (30,000 paroled) The Battle of Vicksburg, or Siege of Vicksburg, was the final significant battle in the Vicksburg Campaign of... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George Gordon Meade Robert Edward Lee Strength 93,921 71,699 Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing) 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing) The Battle of... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... Confederate Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan Morgans Raid was a highly publicized incursion by Confederate cavalry into the Northern states of Indiana and Ohio during the American Civil War. ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar). ... The Battle of Buffington Island, also known as the Buffington Island Skirmish, took place on July 19, 1863, during the American Civil War in Meigs County, Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... The Ohio River is the largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi River. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... Camp Douglas Camp Douglas was a Union prisoner-of-war camp in Chicago, Illinois, USA, during the American Civil War. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Nickname: The Windy City, The Second City, Chi Town, City of the Big Shoulders, The 312, The City that Works Motto: Urbs In Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in Chicagoland and Illinois Coordinates: Country United States State Illinois County Cook & DuPage Incorporated March 4, 1837  - Mayor... Salineville is a village located in Columbiana and Jefferson counties in Ohio. ... July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ...


On November 27, Morgan and several of his officers, most notably Thomas Hines, escaped from the Ohio State Penitentiary—the only successful escape from the prison in the 19th century—and returned safely to the South. Ironically, that same day his wife gave birth to a daughter, who died shortly afterwards before Morgan could return home. November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Thomas Henry Hines was a Confederate spy during the American Civil War. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although Morgan's Raid was breathlessly followed by the Northern and Southern press at the time and caused the Union leadership considerable consternation, most historians now consider it to have been little more than a showy but ultimately futile sidelight to the war. Furthermore, it was done in violation of his orders from Gen. Braxton Bragg. Despite the Raiders' best efforts, the Federal massing of nearly 110,000 Union militia in Illinois, Indiana and Ohio, dozens of U.S. Navy gunboats along the Ohio, Mississippi and Tennessee rivers, and strong Federal cavalry forces doomed the raid from the beginning. The cost of the raid to the Federals was extensive, with claims for damage compensation still being filed against the U.S. government well into the early years of the 20th Century. However, the Confederacy's loss of some of the finest light cavalry in American history far outweighed the Union loss of equipment and supplies. When taken in conjunction with the defeats that month at Vicksburg and Gettysburg, the loss of Morgan's Raiders dealt another serious blow to Confederate national morale. The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... A gunboat is literally a boat carrying one or more guns. ... The Ohio River is the largest tributary by volume of the Mississippi River. ... The Mississippi River, derived from the old Ojibwe word misi-ziibi meaning great river (gichi-ziibi big river at its headwaters), is the second-longest named river in North America, with a length of 2320 miles (3733 km) from Lake Itasca to Gulf of Mexico. ... A riverboat passing under the Henley Street Bridge on the Tennessee River. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999...


After his return from Ohio, Morgan was placed in command of Confederate forces in eastern Tennessee and southwestern Virginia. The men he was assigned were hardly comparable to those he had lost on his raid. Nevertheless, Morgan did what he could. However, he was surprised and shot while attempting to escape capture during a Union raid on Greeneville, Tennessee on September 4, 1864. (His men charged that he had been murdered to prevent a second escape from prison, but this seems unlikely.) Morgan was buried in Lexington shortly before the birth of his second child. Official language(s) English Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Area  Ranked 35th  - Total 42,793 sq mi (110,862 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 7. ... Greeneville is a town in Greene County, Tennessee, United States. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


See also

Alvan Cullem Gillem (1830-75) was a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... The Battle of Buffington Island, also known as the Buffington Island Skirmish, took place on July 19, 1863, during the American Civil War in Meigs County, Ohio. ... The Battle of Corydon took place July 9, 1863, in Harrison County, Indiana during Morgans Raid in the American Civil War. ... // Synopsis The Battle of Salineville is best known as the northernmost battle of the American Civil War involving the Confederate army, or in this case the cavalry [6][19]. The battle occurred on July 26, 1863 near Salineville in Columbiana County, Ohio, approximately 30 miles south of Youngstown, Ohio and... Terrorist redirects here. ...

References

  • Mackey, Robert R., The UnCivil War: Irregular Warfare in the Upper South, 1861-1865, Norman, Okla.: University of Oklahoma Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8061-3624-3.
  • Ramage, James A., Rebel Raider: The Life of General John H. Morgan, Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1995. ISBN 0-8131-0839-X.
  • Horwitz, Lester V., "The Longest Raid of the Civil War." Farmcourt Publishing 1999. ISBN-13: 978-0967026725.

Notes

  1. ^ Harper's Weekly August 30, 1862

Further reading

  • Duke, Basil W., Morgan's Cavalry New York, 1906.
  • Johnson and Buel (editors), The Battles and Leaders of the Civil War New York, 1887.

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Hunt Morgan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (893 words)
John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 September 4, 1864) was a Confederate general and cavalry officer in the American Civil War.
John Hunt Morgan was born in Huntsville, Alabama, the eldest of 10 children of Calvin and Henrietta Hunt Morgan, and uncle of geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan.
Morgan, still interested in a military career, raised a artillery company in 1852 in the state militia, which was disbanded two years later.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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