FACTOID # 22: South Dakota has the highest employment ratio in America, but the lowest median earnings of full-time male employees.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Howard Griffin

John Howard Griffin (June 16, 1920 - September 9, 1980) was a white journalist and author who wrote largely in favor of racial equality. He is best known for darkening his skin and journeying through Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia to experience segregation in the Deep South in 1959. He wrote about the experience in his critically acclaimed Black Like Me. is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ... Black Like Me is a non-fiction book by journalist John Howard Griffin first published in 1961 (it was made into a film in 1964 (Black Like Me (film))). The book describes Griffins (a white native of Mansfield, Texas) six-week experience travelling throughout the racially segregated states of...


Griffin was born in Dallas, Texas on June 16, 1920 to parents John Walter Griffin and Lena May Griffin, née Young.[1] He studied French and literature at the University of Poitiers and medicine at the École de Médecine. At age 19, he worked as a medic in the French Resistance army, and then served 39 months stationed in the South Pacific in the United States Army Air Corps. He became disabled and was decorated for bravery. For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... University of Poitiers is a university located in Poitiers, France, founded in 1431 by Pope Eugenius IV and chartered by King Charles VII of France. ... The South Pacific is an area in the southern Pacific Ocean. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Griffin wrote two major novels, The Devil Rides Outside and Nuni, during a decade of blindness between 1947 and 1957, the result of an accident during his service in US air force. He regained his vision. This article is about the visual condition. ...


His best known work has been Black Like Me, a first-person account of a 6-week journey through the Deep South disguised as a black man. Black Like Me is a non-fiction book by journalist John Howard Griffin first published in 1961 (it was made into a film in 1964 (Black Like Me (film))). The book describes Griffins (a white native of Mansfield, Texas) six-week experience travelling throughout the racially segregated states of... The states in dark red comprise the Deep South. ...


Griffin converted to Catholicism in 1952 and became a Third Order Carmelite. He was a lifelong Democrat. As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Origin and early history Carmelites (in Latin Ordo fratrum Beatæ Virginis Mariæ de monte Carmelo) is the name of a Roman Catholic order founded in the 12th century by a certain Berthold (d. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...


Throughout his life, Griffin lectured and wrote on race relations and social justice. Griffin was awarded the Pacem in Terris Award. It was named after a 1963 encyclical letter by Pope John XXIII that calls upon all people of good will to secure peace among all nations. Pacem in Terris is Latin for "Peace on Earth." He died on September 9, 1980 due to diabetes and/or several other health problems, but not skin cancer or other complications of his skin darkening, as some believe.[2] Race relations is the area of sociology that studies the social, political, and economic relations between races at all different levels of society. ... Social justice refers to the concept of an unjust society that refers to more than just the administration of laws. ... The Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award has been awarded annually since 1964 in commemoration of the 1963 Encyclical Pacem in Terris of Pope John XXIII. It was created by the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council of the Diocese of Davenport in the U.S. state of Iowa. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... An encyclical was a circular letter sent to all the churches of a particular area in the ancient Christian church. ... See also: 15th-century Antipope John XXIII. Pope John XXIII (Latin: ; Italian: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), known as Blessed John XXIII since his beatification, was elected as the 261st Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ... A visibly ill Pope John XXIII, who died shortly afterwards, signing Pacem in Terris. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... This article is about the disease that features high blood sugar. ...


His works include:

  • The Devil Rides Outside (1952)
  • Nuni (1956)
  • Land of the High Sky (1959)
  • Black Like Me (1961)
  • The Church and the Black Man (1969)
  • A Time to be Human (1977)

References

The Texas State Historical Association or abbreviated TSHA, is a non-profit educational organization, dedicated to documenting the rich and unique history of Texas. ... University of Texas redirects here. ... The Urban Legends Reference Pages (also known as snopes. ...

External links

The Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center (usually shortened to HRHRC or just HRC) is an archive at the University of Texas at Austin, specializing in the collection of literary and other cultural artifacts from the United States and Europe. ... University of Texas redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Scattered Shadows | A Memoir of Blindness and Vision | John Howard Griffin (873 words)
The kicker was that Griffin was a southern white.
Griffin learns the tricks of being visionless: reaching for a glass of water, moving about with it in his hands, drinking it.
The power of Griffin's narrative mostly overrides his self-torture on his lack of piety, and we are left with the knowledge that if it had not been for this guilt, the man who darkened his skin so he could write about the racial viciousness of the American south may have never come into existence.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m