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Encyclopedia > John Hay
John Milton Hay
John Hay

In office
November 1, 1879 – May 3, 1881
Preceded by Frederick W. Seward
Succeeded by Robert R. Hitt

In office
September 30, 1898 – July 1, 1905
Preceded by William R. Day
Succeeded by Elihu Root

Born October 8, 1838
Salem, Indiana, USA
Died July 01, 1905 (aged 66)
Newbury, New Hampshire, USA
Political party Republican
Profession Author, Journalist, Statesman, Politician, Secretary

John Milton Hay (October 8, 1838July 1, 1905) was an American statesman, diplomat, author, journalist, and private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (960x1409, 121 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): John Hay United States Secretary of State United States Assistant Secretary of State Metadata This file contains additional... Assistant Secretary of State is a title used for many executive positions in the United States State Department. ... November 1 is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 60 days remaining. ... 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Frederick William Seward (July 8, 1830 – April 25, 1915) was the Assistant Secretary of State during the American Civil War, serving in Abraham Lincolns administration. ... Robert Roberts Hitt (January 16, 1834 – September 20, 1906) was born in Urbana, Ohio to Reverend Thomas Smith Hitt and Emily John Hitt. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit | U.S. Secretaries of State | Spanish-American War people | American lawyers | 1849 births | 1923 deaths ... Elihu Root Elihu Root (February 15, 1845 – February 7, 1937) was an American lawyer and statesman, the son of Oren Root and Nancy Whitney Buttrick. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Salem is a city located in Washington County, Indiana. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Newbury is a town located in Merrimack County, New Hampshire. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... An author is any person(s) or entity(s) that originates and assumes responsibility for an expression or communication. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Statesman is a respectful term used to refer to politicians, and other notable figures of state. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A secretary is either an administrative assistant in business office administration, or a certain type of mid- or high-level governmental position, such as a Secretary of State. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Life

Hay was born in Salem, Indiana, of Scottish ancestry,[1] raised in Warsaw, Illinois, and educated at Brown University (1858), where he joined Theta Delta Chi. In 1861 he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Illinois.[2]He began his public career as a secretary to Abraham Lincoln at age 22, while technically a clerk in the Interior Department. At a time when most of Lincoln's cabinet were hostile to him[citation needed] and vying for position and influence, Hay served also as a friend, confidant and companion, as well as a performer of odd jobs. He lived in the northeast corner bedroom on the second floor of the White House. He shared that room with his fellow secretary John G. Nicolay, who was six years older. Salem is a city located in Washington County, Indiana. ... “Scot” redirects here. ... Warsaw is a city located in Hancock County, Illinois. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Theta Delta Chi (ΘΔΧ, Theta Delt) is a social fraternity that was founded in 1847 at Union College. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... John George Nicolay (1832–1901) was an American (German-born) biographer. ...


For a few months, he served in the Union army under Generals Hunter and Gillmore. He rose to the rank of major and was later brevetted lieutenant colonel and colonel. [3] Hay's diary and writings during the Civil War are basic historical sources. Some have credited Hay with being the real author of President Lincoln's Letter to Mrs. Bixby, consoling her for the loss of her sons in the war. The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ... David Hunter David Hunter (July 21, 1802 – February 2, 1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. ... Civil War–era portrait of Gillmore. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Bixby Letter is a famous writing by Abraham Lincoln, to a bereaved mother of soldiers who died in the American Civil War. ...


Hay was present when President Lincoln died after being shot at Ford's Theatre. Hay and John G. Nicolay wrote a formal 10-volume biography of Lincoln (Abraham Lincoln: A History, 1890) and prepared an edition of his collected works. Fords Theatre at 511 10th Street, NW, Washington, D.C. is an active theatre in Washington DC, United States, used for various performances. ...

John Hay as a young man

Portions of Hay's diaries and letters from 1861–1870, published in the book Lincoln and the Civil War, show the President in a far more intimate light. The portrait of Abraham Lincoln is affectionate, certainly biased in Lincoln's favor, but also contains insights and anecdotes of the homely and humorous sort that Lincoln enjoyed. Image File history File links Younger_Hay. ... Image File history File links Younger_Hay. ...


Hay was named U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom in 1897 when William McKinley became President. Some of the recognition of the longstanding community of interests between that country and the United States came as a result of Hay's stay there.[citation needed] In August 1898, Hay was named Secretary of State and helped negotiate the Treaty of Paris of 1898. Hay continued serving as Secretary of State after Theodore Roosevelt succeeded McKinley, serving until his own death in 1905. This is a list of ambassadors from the United States. ... For the mountain, see Mount McKinley. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Treaty of Paris of 1898, signed on December 10, 1898, ended the Spanish-American War. ...


His contributions included the adoption of an Open Door Policy in China (announced on January 2, 1900) and the preparations for the Panama Canal. He negotiated the Hay-Pauncefote Treaty (1901), the Hay-Herran Treaty (1903), and the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty (1903), all of which were instrumental clearing the way for the construction and usage of the Canal. In all he brought about more than 50 treaties, including the settlement of the Samoan dispute, as a result of which the United States secured Tutuila, with an excellent harbor in the Pacific; a definitive Alaskan boundary treaty in 1903; the negotiation of reciprocity treaties with Argentina, France, Germany, Cuba, and the British West Indies; the negotiation of new treaties with Spain; and the negotiation of a treaty with Denmark for the cession of the Danish West India Islands.[4] – Spheres of influence in China prior to the Open Door Policy. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1900 (MCM) was an exceptional common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar, but a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... Two Panamax running the Miraflores Locks The Panama Canal (Spanish: ) is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ... The Hay-Pauncefote Treaty gave the United States exclusive rights to build, control and fortify a canal across the narrow part of Central America. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Map of Panama, with Panama canal The Hay-Herran Treaty was a treaty proposed in 1904 between the United States and Colombia. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Map of Panama, with Panama canal On November 18, 1903, the United States and the newly independent (since November 3) nation of Panama signed the Hay-Bunau Varilla Treaty. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Tutuila is the main island of American Samoa. ... The Pacific Ocean (from the Latin name Mare Pacificum, peaceful sea, bestowed upon it by the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan) is the largest of the Earths oceanic subdivisions. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Roadtown, Tortola The term British West Indies refers to territories in and around the Caribbean which were colonised by Great Britain. ... Motto United in Pride and Hope Anthem Virgin Islands March Capital (and largest city) Charlotte Amalie Official languages English Government  -  Head of State George W. Bush  -  Governor John de Jongh Organized, unincorporated territory  -  Revised Organic Act 22 July 1954  Area  -  Total 346. ...


In 1904, Hay was one of the first seven chosen for membership in the American Academy of Arts and Letters. The American Academy of Arts and Letters is an organization whose goal is to foster, assist, and sustain an interest in American literature, music, and art. ...


He is buried in Lake View Cemetery in Cleveland, Ohio. Lakeview Cemetary, Cleveland, Ohio Founded in 1869, Lake View Cemetery sits on 285 acres (1. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ...


Legacy

Hay is also renowned for his comment, written in a letter to President Theodore Roosevelt, describing the Spanish-American War as a "splendid little war." Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. ... Combatants United States Republic of Cuba Philippine Republic Spain Commanders Nelson A. Miles William R. Shafter George Dewey Máximo Gómez Emilio Aguinaldo Patricio Montojo Pascual Cervera Arsenio Linares General Ramón Blanco Casualties 3,289 U.S. dead (432 from combat); considerably higher although undetermined Cuban and Filipino...


Hay appears as a character in Gore Vidal's historical novels Lincoln and Empire. He appears, portrayed by John Huston, in the 1975 film The Wind and the Lion, a fictionalization of the Perdicaris Affair in Morocco in 1904. He is portrayed in the 1997 miniseries Rough Riders by actor and legendary United States Marine R. Lee Ermey. Eugene Luther Gore Vidal (born October 3, 1925) (pronounced , occasionally , , etc) is an American author of novels, stage plays, screenplays, and essays. ... Lincoln is a historical novel by Gore Vidal, published in 1984. ... Empire is the fourth historical novel in the Narratives of Empire series by Gore Vidal, published in 1987. ... John Marcellus Huston (August 5, 1906 – August 28, 1987) was an American film director and actor. ... The Wind and the Lion is a 1975 adventure film. ... Ion Perdicaris (1840 - 1925) was a U.S.-Greek playboy who was the centre of the infamous Perdicaris incident, a kidnapping that aroused international conflict in 1904. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... A miniseries (sometimes mini-series), in a serial storytelling medium, is a production which tells a story in a limited number of episodes. ... Roosevelt and the Rough Riders atop San Juan Heights, 1898 The Rough Riders was the name bestowed by the American press on the 1st U.S. ... United States Marine Corps Emblem The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is the second smallest of the five branches of the United States armed forces, with 170,000 active and 40,000 reserve Marines as of 2002. ... Ronald Lee Ermey (born March 24, 1944) is a former U.S. Marine Corps drill instructor and later Golden Globe-nominated actor, often playing the roles of authority figures, such as Gunnery Sergeant Hartman in Full Metal Jacket, Mayor Tilman in the Alan Parker film Mississippi Burning and Sheriff Hoyt...


Hay was a dear friend to Henry Adams, American historian and author. Hay and Adams built homes next to one another on Lafayette Square in Washington, DC, designed by H.H. Richardson. That structure was demolished and the site is now occupied by the Hay-Adams Hotel, named in their honor. Henry Adams Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 – March 27, 1918) was an American historian, journalist and novelist. ... Presidents Park is a unit of the National Park Service, located in Washington, D.C., USA at 38° 53′ 42″ N 77° 02′ 11″ W. It includes the White House, a visitor center, Lafeyette Square, and the Ellipse. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Hay-Adams Hotel The Hay-Adams Hotel is a luxury hotel in Washington, D.C., located at 800 16th Street, NW, across Lafayette Park from the White House, and across the street from St. ...


Brown University's John Hay Library housed the entire library collection from its construction in 1910 until the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library was built in 1964. In 1971, when physical science materials were transferred to the new Sciences Library, the John Hay Library became exclusively a repository for the Library's Special Collections. John D. Rockefeller Jr. ...


For more information regarding John Hay, read The Five of Hearts.


His daughter Alice Evelyn Hay married James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. [5] Another daughter, Helen Julia Hay, married Payne Whitney, and they were the parents of John Hay Whitney and Joan Whitney Payson. Cover of Time Magazine (December 28, 1925) James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. ... William Payne Whitney (March 20, 1876 - May 25, 1927) was a wealthy American businessman and member of the influential Whitney family. ... John Hay Whitney (August 27, 1904 in Ellsworth, Maine – February 8, 1982), colloquially known as Jock Whitney, was U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom, publisher of the New York Herald Tribune, and a member of the Whitney family. ... Joan Whitney Payson (February 5, 1903 – October 4, 1975) was an American heiress, businesswoman, philanthropist, patron of the arts and art collector, and a member of the prominent Whitney family. ...


Books by Hay

  • Abraham Lincoln: a History (with John G. Nicolay)
  • The Bread-winners
  • A Social Study
  • Castilian Days (1875)
  • Pike County Ballads and Other Poems (1871)
  • Poems
  • Abraham Lincoln: A History (nine volumes, 1890)

John George Nicolay (February 26, 1832, Essingen, Rhineland-Palatinate – September 26, 1901) was an American (German-born) biographer of Abraham Lincoln. ...

References

  • Lorenzo Sears, John Hay, Author and Statesman (New York, 1914)
  • Warren Zimmerman, First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a World Power (New York, 2002)

Lorenzo Sears, A.M., Litt. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
John Hay
Preceded by
Frederick W. Seward
United States Assistant Secretary of State
18791881
Succeeded by
Robert R. Hitt
Preceded by
Thomas F. Bayard
United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom
18971898
Succeeded by
Joseph H. Choate
Preceded by
William R. Day
United States Secretary of State
18981905
Succeeded by
Elihu Root

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Hay - LoveToKnow 1911 (517 words)
JOHN HAY (1838-1905), American statesman and author, was born at Salem, Indiana, on the 8th of October 1838.
Hay was secretary of the U.S. legation at Paris in 1865-1867, at Vienna in1867-1869and at Madrid in 1869-1870.
John Hay was a man of quiet and unassuming disposition, whose training in diplomacy gave a cool and judicious character to his statesmanship.
John Hay (526 words)
Hay was secretary of the U.S. legation at Paris in 1865-67, at Vienna in 1867-69 and at Madrid in 1869-70.
Hay was an excellent public speaker, some of his best addresses are: In Praise of Omar; On the Unveiling of the Bust of Sir Walter Scott in Westminster Abbey, May 21, 1897; and a memorial address in honor of President McKinley.
John Hay is the grandfather of newspaperman John Hay Whitney.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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