FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Harvard (clergyman)
John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. Despite its name, the statue does not actually depict John Harvard as the artist had no accurate image to work from. The statue, known by Harvard tour guides as the statue of three lies, claims that it depicts John Harvard, Founder, 1638, but in reality Harvard was merely a contributor, not the founder; the institution was founded in 1636; and the statue is actually a likeness of somebody else, often supposed to be a Harvard student or professor

John Harvard (November 26, 1607September 14, 1638), despite having spent less than eighteen months of his life in Massachusetts, is known in the USA as a Massachusetts clergyman after whom Harvard University is named. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB)The John Harvard statue in Harvard Yard is a common target of pranks just like the rainbow lei around his neck. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2377x1835, 861 KB)The John Harvard statue in Harvard Yard is a common target of pranks just like the rainbow lei around his neck. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) , is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... November 26 is the 330th day (331st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 20 - Tidal wave swept along the Bristol Channel, killing 2000 people. ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (258th in leap years). ... Events March 29 - Swedish colonists establish first settlement in Delaware, called New Sweden. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) , is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


He was born and raised in London, in the borough of Southwark (and baptised at Southwark Cathedral), the fourth of nine children, the son of Robert Harvard (1562-1625), a butcher and tavern owner, and his wife, Katherine Rogers (1584-1635), a native of Stratford-on-Avon whose father, Thomas Rogers (1540-1611), is sometimes thought to have been an associate of William Shakespeare (1564-1616). John Harvard was educated at St. Saviour's Grammar School in Southwark, where his father Robert was a governor. This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The London Borough of Southwark is a London borough in London, England. ... Southwark Cathedral Southwark Cathedral or The Cathedral and Collegiate Church of St Saviour and St Mary Overie, Southwark, London, lies on the south bank of the River Thames close to London Bridge. ... Butcher shop in Valencia A butcher is someone who prepares various meats and other related goods for sale. ... A tavern is, loosely, a place of business where people gather to drink alcoholic beverages and, more than likely, also be served food, though not licenced to put up guests. ... Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... St. ...


In 1625, his father, a stepsister, and two brothers died of the plague. Of his immediate family, only his mother and one brother, Thomas, remained. She remarried to John Elletson (1580-1626) who died within months of their marriage, and then to Richard Yearwood (1580-1632) in 1627. Harvard entered Emmanuel College, Cambridge, then a Puritan stronghold, in December 1627 and received his B. A. in 1632. Katherine died in 1635 and Thomas in the spring of 1637. John married Ann Sadler (1614-1655), of Ringmer, Sussex, in April, 1636, daughter of the Rev. John Sadler and sister of Harvard's contemporary, John Sadler, the lawyer and orientalist. Events March 27 - Prince Charles Stuart becomes King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... Bubonic plague is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease plague, which is caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis. ... Full name Emmanuel College Motto - Named after Immanuel Previous names - Established 1584 Sister College(s) Exeter College Master The Lord Wilson of Dinton Location St Andrews Street Undergraduates 494 Postgraduates 98 Homepage Boatclub Emmanuel front court and the Wren chapel Emmanuel College is a constituent college of the University... A Puritan of 16th and 17th century England was any person seeking purity of worship and doctrine, especially the parties that rejected the Laudian reform of the Church of England. ... Events A Dutch ship makes the first recorded sighting of the coast of South Australia. ... Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe November 8 - Wladyslaw IV Waza elected king of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth after Zygmunt III Waza death November 16 - Battle of Lützen... Events February 10 - The Académie française in Paris is expanded to become a national academy for the artistic elite. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... Ringmer is a village and civil parish in the Lewes District of East Sussex, England. ... Sussex is a traditional county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures, by Westerners. ...


In May 1637 he emigrated with his wife to New England and settled in Charlestown, Massachusetts where many of his classmates had arrived before him. Charlestown made him the minister of the Church, but within the following year he contracted tuberculosis and died on September 14, 1638. Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ... In most Protestant churches, a minister is a member of the ordained clergy who leads a congregation; such a person may also be called a Pastor, Preacher, or Elder. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis, which most commonly affects the lungs (pulmonary TB) but can also affect the central nervous system, lymphatic system, circulatory system, genitourinary system, bones, joints, and even the...


Childless, Harvard bequeathed £779 (half of his estate) and his library of around 400 volumes to the New College at nearby Cambridge, which had been founded on September 8, 1636, and to his friend, the first schoolmaster of this college, Nathaniel Eaton. Eaton's Records indicate that the building of the new college began immediately in 1638 with the assistance of the carpenter Thomas Meakins and/or his son, Thomas Meakins, Jr. of Charlestown. It was completely constructed of wood with a stone foundation and cellar, had its own apple orchard, and was apparently equipped with live-in accommodations for some 30 students as there were at least that many attendant within the first year. ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ...   Settled: 1630 â€“ Incorporated: 1636 Zip Code(s): 02138, 02139, 02140, 02141, 02142 â€“ Area Code(s): 617 / 857 Official website: http://www. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... Events February 24 - King Christian of Denmark gives an order that all beggars that are able to work must be sent to Brinholmen Island to build ships or as galley rowers March 26 - Utrecht University founded in The Netherlands. ... A schoolmaster or simply master once referred to a male school teacher. ... Nathaniel Eaton (1610–1674) was the first schoolmaster of Harvard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later became a clergyman. ... Birdseye view of Boston, Charlestown, and Bunker Hill between 1890 and 1910. ...


The school renamed itself "Harvard College" on March 13, 1639, and Harvard was first referred to as a university rather than a college by the new Massachusetts constitution of 1780. March 13 is the 72nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (73rd in leap years). ... Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. ... For a list of universities around the world, see Lists of colleges and universities Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the fundamental governing document of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... 1780 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


No records or illustrations remain of the earliest college which burnt to the ground in 1674 along with all but one of Harvard's original 400 volume donation. Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Reference.com/Encyclopedia/John Harvard (clergyman) (517 words)
John Harvard (November 26, 1607 – September 14, 1638), despite having spent less than eighteen months of his life in Massachusetts, is known in the USA as a Massachusetts clergyman after whom Harvard University is named.
He was born and raised in London, in the borough of Southwark, the fourth of nine children, the son of Robert Harvard (1562-1625), a butcher and tavern owner, and his wife, Katherine Rogers (1584-1635), a native of Stratford-on-Avon whose father, Thomas Rogers (1540-1611), is sometimes thought to have been an associate of William Shakespeare (1564-1616).
John married Ann Sadler (1614-1655), of Ringmer, Sussex, in April, 1636, daughter of the Rev. John Sadler and sister of Harvard's contemporary, John Sadler, the lawyer and orientalist.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m