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Encyclopedia > John Glenn
John H. Glenn, Jr.


In office
December 24, 1974January 6, 1999
Preceded by Howard Metzenbaum
Succeeded by George Voinovich

Born July 18, 1921 (1921-07-18) (age 86)
Cambridge, Ohio
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse Annie Glenn
Religion Presbyterian

John Herschel Glenn Jr. (born July 18, 1921, in Cambridge, Ohio) is an American astronaut, Marine Corps fighter pilot, ordained Presbyterian elder, corporate executive, United States Senator, and Democratic politician. Of the Mercury Seven original astronaut group, he was the third American to fly in space and the first American to orbit the Earth, aboard Friendship 7 in 1962. After retiring from NASA, he served as a United States Senator from 1974 to 1999. He received the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 1978. He became the oldest person to fly in space when, at the age of 77 in 1998, he flew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-95). Glenn and M. Scott Carpenter are the last surviving members of the Mercury Seven as of May, 2008. John Glenn might refer to: John Glenn, the United States astronaut and statesman John Glenn (Alberta), the early Alberta settler John Glen, the British film director John Thomas Glenn (1844–1899), Mayor of Atlanta John Glenn (baseball outfielder) (b. ... Image File history File links Offical Senate Photo of Sen. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guernsey County Courthouse Cambridge is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Guernsey County. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guernsey County Courthouse Cambridge is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Guernsey County. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of the United States is head of state, head of government, and of a two-party legislative and electoral system. ... Original seven Astronauts portrait (L-R: Schirra, Shepard, Slayton, Grissom, Glenn, Cooper, Carpenter) The Mercury Seven was the group of seven Mercury astronauts picked in April 1959. ... Two bodies with a slight difference in mass orbiting around a common barycenter. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... // Crew John Glenn (flew on Mercury 6 & STS-95) Backup Crew M. Scott Carpenter Mission parameters Mass: 1,352 kg Perigee: 159 km Apogee: 265 km Inclination: 32. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Congressional Space Medal of Honor The Congressional Space Medal of Honor was authorized by the United States Congress in 1969 to recognize any astronaut who in the performance of his duties has distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious efforts and contributions to the welfare of the Nation and mankind. ... Space Shuttle Discovery (Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-103) is one of the three currently operational spacecraft in the Space Shuttle fleet of NASA, the space agency of the United States. ... This is a mission of the United States Space Shuttle. ... Malcolm Scott Carpenter (born May 1, 1925) was one of the original seven Mercury astronauts for Project Mercury, chosen in 1959 to lead America in its race to beat the Russians to the moon. ...

Contents

Early life and military career

Glenn was born in Cambridge, Ohio and raised in New Concord, Ohio and studied chemistry at Muskingum College. Glenn received his private pilot’s license as physics course credit at Muskingum in 1941. After the Attack on Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps. When the Army did not call him up, he enlisted as a United States Navy aviation cadet in March 1942 and was trained at Naval Air Station Olathe where he made his first solo flight in a military aircraft. During advanced training at the Naval Air Station Corpus Christi he was reassigned to the United States Marine Corps in 1943.[1] During World War II he was originally assigned to VMJ-353 flying R4D transport planes but eventually managed a transfer to VMF-155 as an F4U Corsair pilot and flew in 59 combat missions.[2] He saw action over the Marshall Islands, specifically Maloelap, where he attacked anti-aircraft gunnery and dropped bombs. In 1945, Glenn was transferred to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland where he was promoted to captain by the war's end. Guernsey County Courthouse Cambridge is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Guernsey County. ... Fox Run S bridge. ... Muskingum College is a selective, private four-year liberal arts college located in New Concord, Ohio, approximately sixty miles east of the state capital of Columbus. ... This article is about the actual attack. ... 1. ... USN redirects here. ... New Century AirCenter (IATA: JCI, ICAO: KIXD, FAA LID: IXD), formerly known as Johnson County Industrial Airport, is a general aviation airport located four miles (6 km) southwest of the central business district (CBD) of Olathe, a city in Johnson County, Kansas, USA. Although most U.S. airports use the... Naval Air Station Corpus Christi is a United States Navy base in Corpus Christi, Texas. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Marine Fighting Squadron 155 (VMF-155) was a fighter squadron of the United States Marine Corps in World War II. During the war, they flew the SBC Helldiver and, after reconstitution in 1943, the F4F Wildcat. ... The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service in World War II and the Korean War (and in isolated local conflicts). ... Maloelap Atoll The Maloelap Atoll is an atoll of 75 islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, is a United States Navy Naval Air Station located in St. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Largest metro area Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N...

John Herschel Glenn, Jr
Born July 18, 1921

Nickname "Magnet Ass"
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch United States Marine Corps
Rank Colonel
Unit VMF-155 "Silver Eagles",
VMF-218 "Ready Teddy",
VMF-311 "Tomcats"
Battles/wars World War II,
Korean War
Awards Distinguished Flying Cross (6)

Following the war, as a member of VMF-218, Glenn flew patrol missions in North China, until his unit was moved to Guam. In 1948 he became a flight instructor at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Texas. Following that he attended amphibious warfare school and was given a staff assignment. is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Please see Colonel for other countries which use this rank Insignia of a United States Colonel Colonel is a rank of the United States armed forces. ... Marine Fighting Squadron 155 (VMF-155) was a fighter squadron of the United States Marine Corps in World War II. During the war, they flew the SBC Helldiver and, after reconstitution in 1943, the F4F Wildcat. ... Marine Attack Squadron 311 (VMA-311) is a United States Marine Corps fighter squadron consisting of AV-8B Harrier (V/STOL) jets. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... For other uses, see Distinguished Flying Cross. ... Northern Peoples Republic of China region. ... Naval Air Station Corpus Christi is a United States Navy base in Corpus Christi, Texas. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ...


Glenn was finally assigned to VMF-311 flying the F9F Panther and eventually took part in 63 combat missions with the Marines during the Korean War. It was during this time that Glenn earned the nickname "Magnet Ass", for his ability to attract flak. On two occasions he brought his jet back to base with over 250 holes in it.[3] During his time in Korea, Glenn also served for a time alongside Ted Williams, a future hall of fame baseball player for the Boston Red Sox. On his second tour he flew with the United States Air Force on an interservice exchange. Flying 27 missions in the F-86 Sabre, he shot down three MiG-15s near the Yalu River in the last nine days of the war. Marine Attack Squadron 311 (VMA-311) is a United States Marine Corps fighter squadron consisting of AV-8B Harrier (V/STOL) jets. ... The American Grumman F9F Panther was the manufacturers first jet fighter and the U.S. Navys second. ... Belligerents United Nations: Republic of Korea Australia Belgium Canada Colombia Ethiopia France Greece Luxembourg Netherlands New Zealand Philippines South Africa Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States Naval Support and Military Servicing/Repairs: Japan Medical staff: Denmark Italy Norway India Sweden DPR Korea PR China Soviet Union Commanders Syngman Rhee Chung... FLAK was a punk rock side project of members of the band Machinae Supremacy in 2001. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This article is about the sport. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... USAF redirects here. ... The North American F-86 Sabre (sometimes called the Sabrejet) was a transonic combat aircraft developed for the US Air Force. ... The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 (Russian: ) (NATO reporting name Fagot) was a jet fighter developed for the USSR by Artem Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich. ... The Amnok River, or the Yalu River, is a river on the border between China and North Korea. ...


He returned to NAS Pax River, with an appointment to the Test Pilot School (class 12). As a test pilot, he served as armament officer, flying planes to high altitude and testing their cannon/machine guns. On July 16, 1957, Glenn completed the first supersonic transcontinental flight in a Vought F8U Crusader. The California to New York flight took 3 hours, 23 minutes and 8 seconds. As Glenn passed over his hometown, a child in the neighborhood reportedly ran to the Glenn house shouting "Johnny dropped a bomb! Johnny dropped a bomb! Johnny dropped a bomb!" as the sonic boom shook the town.[4] U.S. Naval Test Pilot School Logo The United States Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), located at Naval Air Station (NAS) Patuxent River, Maryland, provides instruction to experienced U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, Army and Air Force pilots, flight officers, and engineers in the processes and techniques of aircraft and... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Transcontinental flight is travelling by air from the Atlantic Ocean coast to the Pacific Ocean coast, or in the reverse. ... The F-8 Crusader (originally F8U) was a single-engine aircraft carrier-based fighter aircraft built by Chance-Vought of Dallas, Texas, USA. It replaced the Vought F-7 Cutlass. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the state. ...


NASA

John Herschel Glenn Jr.
John Glenn
NASA Astronaut
Nationality American
Born July 18, 1921
Cambridge, OH
Other occupation Test pilot
Rank Colonel, USMC
Space time 9d 02h 39 m
Selection 1959 NASA Group
Missions Mercury-Atlas 6, STS-95
Mission
insignia

In April 1959, Glenn was assigned to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as one of the original group of Mercury astronauts for the Mercury Project. During this time, he remained an officer in the Marine Corps. He piloted the first American manned orbital mission aboard Friendship 7 on February 20, 1962, on the "Mercury Atlas 6" mission, lasting 4 hours, 55 minutes, and 23 seconds. During the mission there was concern that his heat shield had failed and that his craft would burn up on re-entry but he made his splash down safely. Glenn was celebrated as a national hero, and received a ticker-tape parade reminiscent of Lindbergh. His fame and political gifts were noted by the Kennedys, and he became a personal friend of the Kennedy family. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guernsey County Courthouse Cambridge is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Guernsey County. ... Test pilots are aviators who fly new and modified aircraft in specific maneuvers, allowing the results to be measured and the design to be evaluated. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... 1958 1959 1960 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1978 1979 1980 1982 1984 1985 1987 1990 1992 1994 1995 1996 1997 2000 2003 2004 1958 June 25 - Man In Space Soonest - USA The first group of American astronaut candidates were selected... // Crew John Glenn (flew on Mercury 6 & STS-95) Backup Crew M. Scott Carpenter Mission parameters Mass: 1,352 kg Perigee: 159 km Apogee: 265 km Inclination: 32. ... This is a mission of the United States Space Shuttle. ... Mercury 6 Insignia File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 594 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,400 × 2,424 pixels, file size: 5. ... For other uses, see NASA (disambiguation). ... Original seven Astronauts portrait (L-R: Schirra, Shepard, Slayton, Grissom, Glenn, Cooper, Carpenter) The Mercury Seven was the group of seven Mercury astronauts picked in April 1959. ... Project Mercury was the first human spaceflight program of the United States. ... The UKs Royal Marines in a Rigid Raider assault watercraft A marine corps (from French corps de marine) is a branch of a nations armed forces incorporating Marines, intended to be capable of mounting amphibious assaults using infantry, armour, aircraft, and watercraft. ... // Crew John Glenn (flew on Mercury 6 & STS-95) Backup Crew M. Scott Carpenter Mission parameters Mass: 1,352 kg Perigee: 159 km Apogee: 265 km Inclination: 32. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... Ticker-tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969 A ticker-tape parade is a parade event, held in a downtown urban setting, allowing the jettison of large amounts of shredded paper products from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) (aka Lucky Lindy; The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator, author, inventor, explorer, and peace activist who, on May 20–21, 1927, rose from virtual obscurity to instantaneous world fame as the result of his exploits as the pilot of the... An interpersonal relationship is some relationship or connection between two people. ... The Irish Catholic political dynasty, John, Robert, and Edward Kennedy The Kennedy family is a prominent Irish-American family in American politics and government descending from the marriage of Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy. ...

Medical debriefing aboard USS Randolph (CVS-15). The debriefing team for Glenn (center) was led by Cmdr. Seldon C. "Smokey" Dunn, USN MC (far right w/EKG in hands).
Medical debriefing aboard USS Randolph (CVS-15). The debriefing team for Glenn (center) was led by Cmdr. Seldon C. "Smokey" Dunn, USN MC (far right w/EKG in hands).

Although NASA did not publish the frequencies for the communications with space, according to a TV documentary two Italian radio enthusiasts, the Judica Cordiglia brothers, used a photograph of an American space ship to calculate the length of the antenna. They found the frequency and were the first individuals to record the voice of Glenn from space.[5][dubious ] Image File history File links 19620220-JohnGlennMedical. ... Image File history File links 19620220-JohnGlennMedical. ... The second USS Randolph (CV-15) of the United States Navy was a Ticonderoga-class aircraft carrier. ...


Glenn resigned from NASA six weeks after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy to run for office in his home state of Ohio. In 1965, Glenn retired as a Colonel from the USMC and entered the business world as an executive for Royal Crown Cola. He reentered politics later on. Some accounts of Glenn's years at NASA suggest that Glenn was prevented from flying in Gemini or Apollo missions, either by President Kennedy, himself, or by NASA management, on the grounds that the subsequent loss of a national hero of such stature would seriously harm or even end the manned space program. Yet Glenn resigned from the astronaut corps on January 30, 1964, well before even the first Gemini crew was assigned. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... For other uses, see Colonel (disambiguation). ... R.C. Cola (or Royal Crown Cola) is a cola soft drink developed in 1905 by Columbus, Georgia pharmacist Claud A. Hatcher. ... Project Gemini was the second human spaceflight program of the United States of America. ... This article is about the series of human spaceflight missions. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Three decades later, after serving 24 years in the Senate, Glenn lifted off for a second space flight on October 29, 1998, on Space Shuttle Discovery's STS-95, in order to study the effects of space flight on the elderly. At age 77, Glenn became the oldest person ever to go into space. Glenn's participation in the nine-day mission was criticized by some in the space community as a junket for a politician. Others noted that Glenn's flight offered valuable research on weightlessness and other aspects of space flight on the same person at two points in life thirty-five years apart — by far the longest interval between space flights by the same person. Upon the safe return of the STS-95 crew, Glenn (and his crewmates) received another ticker-tape parade, making him the ninth (and, as of 2007, final) person to have ever received multiple ticker-tape parades in his lifetime (as opposed to that of a sports team).[citation needed] Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the space vehicle. ... Space Shuttle Discovery (Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-103) is one of the three currently operational spacecraft in the Space Shuttle fleet of NASA, the space agency of the United States. ... This is a mission of the United States Space Shuttle. ... Ticker-tape parade in New York City in honor of the Apollo 11 astronauts, August 1969 A ticker-tape parade is a parade event, held in a downtown urban setting, allowing the jettison of large amounts of shredded paper products from nearby office buildings onto the parade route, creating a... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ...


Glenn vehemently opposed the sending of Dennis Tito, the world's first space tourist, to the International Space Station on the grounds that Tito's trip served no scientific purpose. [3] Dennis Anthony Tito (born August 8, 1940 in Queens, New York) is a United States multimillionaire who gained celebrity status by becoming the first space tourist to pay for his own ticket, although he himself opposes being called tourist and asks to be called an independent researcher since he performed... Space tourism is the recent phenomenon of space travel by individuals for the purpose of personal pleasure. ...


The NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio is named after him. Colonel Glenn Highway, which runs by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and Wright State University near Dayton, Ohio, and John Glenn High School in his hometown of New Concord, Ohio were named for him as well. Aerial View of Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field The Glenn Research Center is a NASA center, located in Cleveland, Ohio between Cleveland Hopkins International Airport and the Rocky River Reservation (part of the Cleveland Metroparks). ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base is a U.S. Air Force base in Greene and Montgomery counties, adjacent to Riverside, Fairborn, Beavercreek, and Dayton, Ohio. ... Wright State University is a public university in Ohio, U.S. The university uses Dayton as its postal address but the campus is actually completely within the city limits of Fairborn. ... : Gem City : Birthplace of Aviation United States Ohio Montgomery 56. ...

Glenn's autographed EKG trace.Best regards and many thanksfor all the help, "Smokey" —John H. Glenn Jr Mercury Astronaut a good date — 20 Feb 62
Glenn's autographed EKG trace.
Best regards and many thanks
for all the help, "Smokey" —
John H. Glenn Jr
Mercury Astronaut
a good date — 20 Feb 62

Image File history File links 19620220-JohnGlennEKG.jpg‎ EKG from Major John Glenn, Jr. ...

Life in politics

In 1964, John Glenn announced that he was resigning from the space program to run against incumbent Senator Stephen M. Young in the Democratic primary, but he was forced to withdraw when he hit his head on a bathtub. He sustained a concussion and injured his inner ear. Recovery left him unable to campaign at that time. credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Stephen Marvin Young (May 4, 1889 - December 1, 1984) was an American politician of the Democratic Party from Ohio. ...


Glenn remained close to the Kennedy family and was with Sen. Robert F. Kennedy when he was assassinated. Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ...


In 1970, Glenn contested for the Democratic nomination for U. S. Senate; Glenn was defeated in the primary by fellow Democrat Howard Metzenbaum, who went on to lose the general election race to Robert Taft Jr. In the bitterly-fought 1974 Democratic primary rematch, Glenn defeated Metzenbaum, who had earlier been appointed by Ohio governor John J. Gilligan to fill out the Senate term of William B. Saxbe, who had resigned to become U. S. attorney general. Metzenbaum was running to retain the seat to which he had been appointed. In the 1974 general election, Glenn defeated Republican Mayor of Cleveland Ralph Perk, beginning a Senate career that would continue until 1999. In 1980, Glenn won re-election to the seat, defeating Republican challenger Jim Betts. In 1986, Glenn defeated challenger U.S. Representative Tom Kindness. The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... For other uses, see Primary. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are up for election. ... Robert Taft (generally known as Robert Taft Jr. ... John Joyce Jack Gilligan (born March 22, 1921) is a Democratic politician from the U.S. state of Ohio who served as its 62nd governor. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Ralph J. Perk (1914 - April 21, 1999) was an American politician of the Republican party of Ohio. ... Thomas Norman Kindness (August 26, 1929 – January 8, 2004) was a member of the United States House of Representatives representing Ohio from January 3, 1975 to January 3, 1987. ...


In the late 1970s and early 1980s, Glenn and Metzenbaum (who was elected to the Senate in 1976) had strained relations, even though they were both from the same party and the same state. There was a thaw in 1983 when Metzenbaum endorsed Glenn for president, and in 1988, in response to a charge by Metzenbaum's opponent George Voinovich that Metzenbaum was soft on child pornography, Glenn appeared in a television ad in support of Metzenbaum. George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... Child pornography refers to pornographic material depicting children. ...


In 1990, Glenn was inducted into the Astronaut Hall of Fame. The U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame is located in Titusville, Florida. ...


Glenn was one of the five U. S. Senators caught up with Lincoln Savings and the Keating Five Scandal after accepting a $200,000 contribution from Charles Keating. Glenn and Republican Senator John McCain were the only Senators exonerated. The Senate Commission found that Glenn had exercised "poor judgment." The association of his name with the scandal gave Republicans hope that he would be vulnerable in the 1992 campaign. Instead, Glenn handily defeated Lieutenant Governor R. Michael DeWine to keep his seat. This 1992 re-election victory was the last time a Democrat won a statewide race in Ohio until 2006; DeWine later won Metzenbaum's seat upon his retirement. ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The Keating Five (or Keating Five Scandal) refers to a Congressional scandal related to the collapse of most of the Savings and Loan institutions in the United States in the late 1980s. ... For other persons named Charles Keating, see Charles Keating (disambiguation). ... McCain redirects here. ... The position of lieutenant governor of Ohio was established in 1852. ... Richard Michael Mike DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ...


In 1998, Glenn declined to run for re-election. The Democratic party chose Mary Boyle to replace him, but she was defeated by then-Ohio Gov. George Voinovich. Mary O. Boyle is an fake fraud stealing identity and user of the community. ...


Glenn made a bid to run as Vice President with Jimmy Carter in 1976, but Carter selected Minnesota Senator Walter Mondale at the 1976 Democratic National Convention. Glenn also mounted a bid to be the 1984 Democratic Presidential candidate. Early on, Glenn polled well, coming in a strong second to Mondale. It was also surmised that he would be aided by the almost-simultaneous release of The Right Stuff, a film about the original seven Mercury astronauts in which it was generally agreed that Glenn's character was portrayed in an appealing manner. However, Glenn thought it would be bad form to capitalize on this kind of publicity, and didn't make much of these achievements in the period leading up to the Iowa caucuses. Media attention turned to Mondale, Gary Hart, and Jesse Jackson, and by the time his campaign started playing up The Right Stuff for the New Hampshire primary, it was already too late. His failed 1984 presidential bid left Glenn with over $3 million in campaign debt that took over 20 years to pay off. [4] The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... For other persons named Gary Hart, see Gary Hart (disambiguation). ... Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ...


During his time in the Senate, he was chief author of the 1978 Nonproliferation Act, served as chairman of the Committee on Governmental Affairs from 1987 until 1995, sat on the Foreign Relations and Armed Services committees and the Special Committee on Aging. Once Republicans regained control of the Senate, Glenn also served as the ranking minority member on a special Senate investigative committee chaired by Tennessee senator Fred Dalton Thompson that looked into alleged illegal donations by China to U.S. political campaigns for the 1996 election. There was considerable acrimony between the two very high-profile senators during the life of this committee, which reached a level of public disagreement between the five leaders of a Congressional committee seldom seen in recent years.[5] The United States Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the federal civil service, the affairs of the District of Columbia, and the United States Postal Service. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging was initially established in 1961 as a temporary committee, and becaming a permanent committee in 1977. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... For the silent movie actor, see Fred Thomson. ... President Clinton with convicted fund-raiser Charlie Trie The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fund-raising practices of the administration itself. ...


Public affairs institute

Glenn helped found the John Glenn Institute for Public Service and Public Policy at the Ohio State University to encourage public service in 1998. On July 1, 2006 the institute merged with OSU's School of Public Policy and Management to become the John Glenn School of Public Affairs. Today he holds an adjunct professorship at both the Glenn School and Ohio State's Department of Political Science. The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The John Glenn School of Public Affairs is a school of public administration, public service research institute, and home to various public programs at the The Ohio State University. ...


Family

Raised in Cambridge as well as New Concord, Ohio, Glenn married his childhood sweetheart, Anna Margaret Castor, whom he met in New Concord and with whom he played in the band; they are the parents of two children, David and Carolyn. Both Glenn and his then-future wife, Annie, attended Muskingum College in New Concord. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Muskingum College is a selective, private four-year liberal arts college located in New Concord, Ohio, approximately sixty miles east of the state capital of Columbus. ...


Glenn's former New Concord home has been made into an education center, teaching American history beginning in 1944.


Glenn is part of the Glenn-Macintosh clan of Scotland. In 1963, Glenn received a letter from a young girl from Sheffield, England named Anne Glenn. The letter, congratulating him on his orbit around the Earth, enclosed a family tree showing that Anne's father, George Arthur Thomas Glenn, and John Glenn were cousins. This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ...


John Glenn's great-nephew, renowned camera operator Glenn Thomas of New York, NY, was named after him, having been born three days after Glenn's historic first flight into space.


On August 4, 2006, Glenn and his wife were injured in an automobile accident on I-270 near Columbus, Ohio and were subsequently hospitalized. They were released on August 6, after being treated for their injuries. Glenn suffered a fractured sternum and a "very sore chest", as remarked by Glenn. The driver of the other car was not injured, but Glenn was cited for failure to yield the right-of-way. Mrs. Glenn was treated for minor injuries.[6] is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Interstate 270 (abbreviated I-270) is the beltway loop freeway in the Columbus metropolitan area, commonly known locally as the outer belt. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The sternum (from Greek στέρνον, sternon, chest) or breastbone is a long, flat bone located in the center of the thorax (chest). ...


Medals and decorations

John Glenn in 1998.
John Glenn in 1998.

Military Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (512x639, 84 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: John Glenn Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (512x639, 84 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: John Glenn Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ...

Civilian For other uses, see Distinguished Flying Cross. ... Air Medal Ribbon The Air Medal is a military decoration of the United States which was established by Executive Order 9158, signed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, on May 11, 1942. ... Navy Unit Commendation The Navy Unit Commendation of the United States Navy is an award that was established by order of the Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal on 18 December 1944. ... The Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal is a decoration of the United States Marine Corps which was first created on May 8, 1919. ... The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal is a service decoration of the Second World War which was awarded to any member of the United States military who served in the Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945. ...

The NASA Distinguished Service Medal is the second highest award which may be bestowed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, ranking immediately below the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. ...

See also

United States Marine Corps Portal

Image File history File links USMC_logo. ...

References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the United States Marine Corps.
Bibliography
  • Fenno, Richard F., Jr. The Presidential Odyssey of John Glenn. CQ Press, 1990. 302 pp.
  • Mersky, Peter B. (1983). U.S. Marine Corps Aviation — 1912 to the present. Annapolis, Maryland: The Nautical and Aviation Publishing Company of America. ISBN 0-933852-39-8. 
  • Shettle Jr., M. L. (2001). United States Marine Corps Air Stations of World War II. Bowersville, Georgia: Schaertel Publishing Co.. ISBN 0-964-33882-3. 
  • Glenn, John H.; Taylor, Nick (2000). John Glenn: A Memoir. New York: Bantam Books. ISBN 0-553-58157-0. 
Web
Endnotes
  1. ^ Ohio State University Biography
  2. ^ Shettle USMC Air Station of WWII, p. 167
  3. ^ Mersky USMC Aviation, p.183
  4. ^ Glenn, John; Taylor, Nick (1998-11-02). John Glenn: A Memoir. Bantam, 169. ISBN 978-0553110746. 
  5. ^ Space Hackers (I pirati dello spazio) TV documentary by A. Bernard, E. Cerasuolo, P. Ceretto - Zenit Arti Audiovisive, 2007
  6. ^ [1] [2]

Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
John Glenn
United States Marine Corps Portal
Preceded by
Howard M. Metzenbaum
United States Senator (Class 3) from Ohio
1974–1999
Served alongside: Robert Taft, Jr., Howard M. Metzenbaum, Mike DeWine
Succeeded by
George Voinovich
Preceded by
William V. Roth, Jr.
Delaware
Chairman of Senate Governmental Affairs Committee
1987–1995
Succeeded by
William V. Roth, Jr.
Delaware
Persondata
NAME Glenn, John
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Glenn, John Herschel, Jr. (full name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION American astronaut and politician
DATE OF BIRTH July 18, 1921
PLACE OF BIRTH Cambridge, Ohio
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH
Source: http://www. ... Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democrat in the U.S. Senate (1976 - 1995). ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... Robert Taft (generally known as Robert Taft Jr. ... Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democrat in the U.S. Senate (1976 - 1995). ... Richard Michael Mike DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... William Victor Bill Roth, Jr. ... The United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs has jurisdiction over matters related to the Department of Homeland Security and other homeland security concerns, as well as the functioning of the government itself, including the National Archives, budget and accounting measures other than appropriations, the Census, the... William Victor Bill Roth, Jr. ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... John Smith (1735 - July 30, 1824) was one of the first two U.S. Senators from the state of Ohio. ... Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr. ... Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Joseph Kerr (1765 - August 22, 1837) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Ruggles (February 21, 1783 _ September 2, 1857 was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Thomas Morris (January 3, 1776 - December 7, 1844) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Tappan (May 25, 1773 - April 20, 1857) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Thomas Corwin, also known as Tom Corwin and The Wagon Boy (July 29, 1794 – December 18, 1865) was a politician from the state of Ohio who served as a prosecuting attorney, a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, United States House of Representatives, and United States Senate, and as... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... Benjamin Franklin Bluff Wade (October 27, 1800 – March 2, 1878) was a U.S. lawyer and United States Senator. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Mark Hanna Mark A. Hanna (September 24, 1837–February 15, 1904), born Marcus Alonzo Hanna, was an industrialist and Republican politician from Ohio. ... Charles William Frederick Dick (November 3, 1858 - March 13, 1945) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Atlee Pomerene (December 6, 1863 _ November 12, 1937) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Simeon Davison Fess (December 11, 1861 - December 23, 1936) was a Republican politician and educator from Ohio. ... Alvin Victor Donahey (also known as A. Victor Donahey, A. Vic Donahey, Vic Donahey, or A. V. Donahey) (July 7, 1873 - April 8, 1946) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Harold Hitz Burton (June 22, 1888 - October 28, 1964) was an American Senator and Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... James Wylie Huffman (September 13, 1894 - May 20, 1980) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Kingsley Arter Taft (July 19, 1903 – March 28, 1970) was an American politician of Ohios Republican Taft family who served as chief justice of the Ohio Supreme Court and also served briefly as a United States Senator. ... John William Bricker (September 6, 1893 – March 22, 1986) was a United States politician from Ohio. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Stephen Marvin Young (May 4, 1889 - December 1, 1984) was an American politician of the Democratic Party from Ohio. ... Robert Taft (generally known as Robert Taft Jr. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... Richard Michael Mike DeWine (born January 5, 1947) is an American politician from Ohio. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Thomas Worthington (July 16, 1773 - June 20, 1827) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Edward Tiffin (June 19, 1766 – August 9, 1829) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio, and the first Governor of that state. ... Stanley Griswold (November 14, 1763 - August 21, 1815) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... Insert non-formatted text here</nowiki>Insert non-formatted text hereAlexander Campbell ([[1779]] – [[November 5]], [[1857]]) was a [[United States National Republican Party|National Republican]] politician from [[Ohio]]. He served in the [[United States Senate|U.S. Senate]]. Born in [[Frederick County, Virginia]], Campbell moved to eastern [[Tennessee]] and... Jeremiah Morrow (October 6, 1771 - March 22, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician from Ohio. ... William Allen Trimble (April 4, 1786 - December 13, 1821) was a National Republican politician from Ohio. ... Ethan Allen Brown (also known as Ethan A. Brown) (July 4, 1776 - February 24, 1852) was a Democratic-Republican politician. ... William Henry Harrison (February 9, 1773 – April 4, 1841) was an American military leader, politician, and the ninth President of the United States. ... Jacob Burnet (1770-1853) was an American jurist and statesman from Ohio. ... Thomas Ewing Thomas Ewing (December 28, 1789–October 26, 1871) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. ... William Allen ( December 27, 1803 - July 11, 1879) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio and Governor of Ohio. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... George Ellis Pugh (November 28, 1822 - July 19, 1876) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... Categories: People stubs | U.S. Supreme Court justices | United States Senators | Ohio State Senators | American lawyers | U.S. Army officers | 1824 births | 1889 deaths ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Henry B. Payne (November 30, 1810 - September 9, 1896) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Calvin Stewart Brice (September 17, 1845 - December 15, 1898) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Joseph Benson Foraker (July 5, 1846 – May 10, 1917) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Warren Gamaliel Harding (November 2, 1865 – August 2, 1923) was an American politician and the 29th President of the United States, from 1921 to 1923. ... Frank Bartlett Willis (December 28, 1871 - March 30, 1928) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Cyrus Locher (March 8, 1878 - August 17, 1929) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Theodore Elijah Burton (December 20, 1851 - October 28, 1929) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Roscoe Conkling McCulloch (November 27, 1880 - March 17, 1958) was a Republican politician from Ohio who served in the United States House of Representatives and U.S. Senate. ... Robert Johns Bulkley (October 8, 1880 - July 21, 1965) was a United States Democratic Party politician from Ohio. ... For the former Governor of Ohio and Robert Tafts grandson, see Bob Taft. ... Thomas A. Burke (October 30, 1898 - December 5, 1971) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... George Harrison Bender (September 29, 1896, Cleveland, Ohio - June 18, 1961, Chagrin Falls, Ohio) was a Republican politician from Ohio. ... Frank John Lausche (November 14, 1895 - April 21, 1990) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... William Bart Saxbe (born June 24, 1916) was an American politician of the Republican Party, who served as a U.S. Senator from Ohio and as U.S. Attorney General under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald R. Ford. ... Howard Metzenbaum Howard Morton Metzenbaum (born June 4, 1917) is an American politician who served for almost 20 years as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate (1974, 1976-1995). ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... Original seven Astronauts portrait (L-R: Schirra, Shepard, Slayton, Grissom, Glenn, Cooper, Carpenter) The Mercury Seven was the group of seven Mercury astronauts picked in April 1959. ... Astronaut M. Scott Carpenter inspects the heat shield of his Aurora 7 space capsule Malcolm Scott Carpenter (born May 1, 1925) was one of the original seven astronauts selected in 1959 for Project Mercury. ... Leroy Gordon Gordo Cooper, Jr. ... Virgil Ivan Gus Grissom (April 3, 1926 – January 27, 1967) was a United States Air Force pilot who became the second American astronaut and one of the first to die in the U.S. space program. ... Walter Marty Schirra, Jr. ... For other persons named Alan Shepard, see Alan Shepard (disambiguation). ... Donald Kent Deke Slayton (March 1, 1924 – June 13, 1993) was one of the original Mercury Seven NASA astronauts. ... 1958 1959 1960 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1978 1979 1980 1982 1984 1985 1987 1990 1992 1994 1995 1996 1997 2000 2003 2004 1958 June 25 - Man In Space Soonest - USA The first group of American astronaut candidates were selected... Original seven Astronauts portrait (L-R: Schirra, Shepard, Slayton, Grissom, Glenn, Cooper, Carpenter) The Mercury Seven was the group of seven Mercury astronauts picked in April 1959. ... NASAs Astronaut Group 2, also known as The New Nine, was the second group of astronauts selected by NASA in September 1962. ... Astronaut Group 3 was the third group of Astronauts selected by NASA in October 1963. ... Astronaut Group 4 was the fourth group of astronauts selected by NASA in June 1965. ... NASAs Astronaut Group 5 (the Original 19) selected by NASA in April 1966. ... Astronaut Group 6 (the XS-11) was announced by NASA on 11 August 1967, the second group of scientist-astronauts. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for providing force projection from the sea,[1] using the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces and is one of seven uniformed services. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... The Commandant of the United States Marine Corps is the highest ranking officer of the United States Marine Corps and a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, reporting to the Secretary of the Navy but not to the Chief of Naval Operations. ... This article is about a military rank and position. ... Image File history File links USMC_logo. ... The United States Marine Corps is administered by the Department of the Navy, which is lead by the Secretary of the Navy(SECNAV). ... Headquarters Marine Corps (HQMC), located in Washington, D.C., includes the offices of the Commandant of the Marine Corps and various agencies and staff functions. ... Presumably a USA force ? // Lineage Activated November 8th, 1969 at Okinawa, Japan as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Redesignated August 18th, 1970 as the I Marine Amphibious Force Relocated in April 1971 to Camp Pendleton, California Redesignated February 5th, 1988 as the I Marine Expeditionary Force Recent Service Persian Gulf... The 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force (II MEF), one of three MEFs in the Marine Corps, is a combined arms force consisting of ground, air, and logistics forces possessing the capability of projecting offensive combat power ashore while sustaining itself in combat without external assistance for a period of 60... The III Marine Expeditionary Force, is a Marine Air-Ground Task Force of the United States Marine Corps that is forward-deployed and able to deploy rapidly and conduct operations across the spectrum from humanitarian assistance and disaster relief to amphibious assault and high intensity combat. ... The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES) (also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR)), a part of the United States Marine Corps, is the largest command in the Marine Corps. ... United States Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) is a component command of the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) that comprises the Marine Corps contribution to SOCOM. Its core capabilities are direct action, special reconnaissance, foreign internal defense, counterterrorism, information operations, and unconventional warfare. ... Not to be confused with Marine Recon Battalions. ... The Fleet Marine Force is a combined command of the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps which comprises a combination of permanent afloat personnel, stationed on U.S. Navy ships, and ground units of the United States Marine Corps infantry branch. ... The Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) is a term used by the United States Marine Corps to describe the principal organization for all missions across the range of military operations. ... This is a list of U.S. Marine Corps bases and installations, organized by U.S. state within the territory of the U.S. and by country if overseas. ... . ... Marine AV-8B Harrier II on the deck of USS Nassau While other nations have Marines who are aviators, only the United States Marine Corps has its own dedicated aviation arm. ... The following is a list of Marine Expeditionary Units of the United States Marine Corps. ... Marine ranks in descending order, with tables indicating abbreviations in the style used by the Marine Corps, pay grades, and rank insignia: // Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that... Commissioned Officers are distinguished from other officers by their commission, which is the formal written authority, issued in the name of the President of the United States, that confers the rank and authority of a Marine Officer. ... Enlisted Marines with paygrades of E-4 and E-5 are considered Noncommissioned Officers (NCOs) while those at E-6 and higher are considered Staff Noncommissioned Officers (SNCOs). ... . ... The following is a list of people who served in the United States Marine Corps and have gained fame through previous or subsequent endeavors, infamy, or successes: Joseph M. Acaba Joseph M. Acaba — NASA astronaut Don Adams — actor Mike Anderson — NFL football player Walter Anderson (editor) — author; PARADE Magazine  editor... The following is a list of the essential names in Marine Corps lore; the people who make up what the Marines call Knowledge. John Basilone — only Medal of Honor recipient to return to combat and be killed. ... The Marine Corps League is the only federally-chartered United States Marine Corps-related veterans organization in the U.S. Its Federal Charter was approved by the 75th U.S. Congress and signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on August 4, 1937. ... MCMAP logo The Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) is a combat system developed by the United States Marine Corps to combine existing and new hand-to-hand and close combat techniques with morale and team-building functions and instruction in what the Marine Corps calls the Warrior Ethos.[1... United States Marine Corps Boot Camp, otherwise known as Recruit Training is a program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete upon joining the United States Marine Corps in order to be assigned to a unit. ... The School of Infantry (SOI) — SOI East, located at United States Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, a satellite facility of Camp Lejeune, and the SOI West at Camp Pendleton — host the second stage of initial military training for enlisted Marines after recruit training. ... The United States Marine Corps Officer Candidates School (OCS) is a school located on Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico that trains, screens, and evaluates potential Marine Corps officers. ... The Basic School (TBS) is where all newly commissioned United States Marine Corps officers are sent to learn the art and science of being a Marine officer. ... // The Special Missions Training Center (SMTC) is a US Coast Guard run training facility that is located in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. ... The Uniforms of the United States Marine Corps serve to distinguish Marines from members of other services. ... Military awards of the United States Department of the Navy are those military decorations which are presented to members of the United States Navy and U.S. Marine Corps under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy. ... Badges of the United States Marine Corps are military decorations which are issued by the United States Department of the Navy to service members of the U.S. Marines to denote a variety of qualifications and accomplishments. ... This is a list of weapons used by the United States Marine Corps: // M9 bayonet OKC-3S bayonet Ka-Bar Strider SMF Gerber Mark II Marine Noncommissioned Officers Sword, 1859-Present Marine Officers Mameluke Sword, 1875-Present M1911A1 . ... Marines test the MTV while running an obstacle course at MCB Hawaii. ... U.S. Marines wearing the Lightweight Helmet. ... An ILBE pack is visible on the second Marine from the left The Improved Load Bearing Equipment or ILBE is the United States Marine Corps new backpack, designed to replace the existing ALICE and MOLLE packs currently in service. ... The United States Marine Corps was originally organized as the Continental Marines in 1775 to conduct ship-to-ship fighting, provide shipboard security and assist in landing forces. ... Semper Fidelis is Latin for Always faithful. ... The Marines Hymn is the official hymn of the United States Marine Corps. ... The United States Marine Band, colloquially known as The Presidents Own, was established by an Act of Congress on July 11, 1798, and is America’s oldest professional musical organization. ... The Silent Drill Platoon performs in front of the home of the Commandant of the Marine Corps The United States Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon, a 24-man rifle platoon, often referred to as The Marching Twenty-Four, performs a unique precision exhibition drill. ... Marine One lifting off of the White House south lawn. ... USMC Flag // The Flag of the United States Marine Corps (also known as a standard or battle color) is scarlet with the Corps emblem in gray and gold. ... Eagle, Globe, and Anchor The Eagle, Globe, and Anchor (EGA) is the official emblem of the United States Marine Corps. ... Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima, by Joe Rosenthal / The Associated Press. ... The Riflemans Creed, also known as My Rifle and The Creed of The United States Marine, is a part of basic United States Marine Corps doctrine. ... An early official promotional photo from the Toys for Tots program Motorcyclists fill eastbound I-76 for the 2002 Toys for Tots parade to benefit patients at Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia InPhonics CEO and CFO present the results of the companys Toys for Tots drive at InPhonic... Aerial view of the Museum under construction, taken April 2006. ... This is a list of acronyms, expressions, euphemisms, jargon, military slang, and sayings in common or formerly common use in the United States Marine Corps. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Guernsey County Courthouse Cambridge is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio and the county seat of Guernsey County. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Glenn (190 words)
John Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth and he was the oldest person to ever fly in space.
John Glenn was born on July 18, 1921 in Cambridge, Ohio.
John Glenn was assigned to NASA in April 1959 and has been in space 218 hours.
John Glenn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1509 words)
Glenn's participation in the nine-day mission was criticized by some in the space community as a junket for a politician.
In 1964 John Glenn announced that he was resigning from the space program to run against incumbent Senator Stephen M. Young in the Democratic primary, but he was forced to withdraw when he suffered an injury in his bathroom after attempting to adjust a heavy mirror.
In 1970, Glenn contested for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate; however, Glenn was defeated in the primary by fellow Democrat Howard Metzenbaum, who went on to lose the general election race to Robert Taft Jr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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