FACTOID # 11: Oklahoma has the highest rate of women in State or Federal correctional facilities.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John French, 1st Earl of Ypres
The Earl of Ypres
The Earl of Ypres

John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, PC (28 September 185222 May 1925) was a British Field Marshal, the first commander of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in World War I. Sir John French This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Sir John French This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is an order of chivalry associated with Ireland. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... For other Orders see Order of Merit (disambiguation). ... Victoria founded the Royal Victorian Order. ... On the Orders insignia, St Michael is often depicted subduing Satan. ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... September 28 is the 271st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (272nd in leap years). ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (143rd in leap years). ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ... The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the British army sent to France and Belgium in World War I and British Forces in Europe from 1939 - 1940 during World War II. The BEF was established by Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane following the Second Boer War in case the... Combatants Allies: Serbia, Russia, France, Romania, Belgium, British Empire, United States, Italy, and others Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead:5 million Civilian dead:3 million Total dead:8 million Military dead:4 million Civilian dead:3 million Total dead:7 million The First World...


Biography

Born in Ripple in Kent, the son of Commander John French, an officer in the Royal Navy, he joined the Navy in 1866 but transferred to the British Army in 1874. he served with the 19th Hussars in the Sudan 188485 and was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. As a Lieutenant-General he served as a cavalry commander in the Second Boer War from 1899 to 1902. He was the commander at Aldershot from 1902 to 1907 and was promoted to full General in 1907. He was Chief of Staff of the British Army in 1911, Chief of the Imperial General Staff 191213 and was promoted to Field Marshal in 1913. This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Kent is a county in England, south-east of London. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services being the oldest of its three branches. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Polish Hussar Hussar (original Hungarian spelling: huszár, plural huszárok; via the French hussard) refers to a number of types of cavalry used throughout Europe since the 15th century. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Lieutenant Colonel (Lieutenant-Colonel in British English) is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies and most marine corps and air forces of the world, typically ranking above a Major and below a Colonel. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in almost every country in the world. ... Cavalry is also a common misspelling of the Biblical hill Calvary. ... Combatants British Empire Orange Free State, South African Republic Commanders Frederick Roberts later Lord Kitchener Christiaan Rudolf de Wet and Paul Kruger Casualties Military dead:22,000 Civilian dead:N/A Total dead:22,000 Military dead:6,500 Civilian dead:24,000 Total dead:30,500 The Second Boer... 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... General is a high military rank, used by nearly every country in the world. ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS) was the title of the professional head of the British Army from 1908 to 1964. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Note: This article is about the military usage of the word marshal. For other usages, see the end of this article. ...


Given command of the BEF in August 1914, he argued with the Cabinet against Lord Kitchener and Sir Douglas Haig that the BEF should be deployed in Belgium, rather than Amiens, where both Haig and Kitchener believed it would be well placed to deliver a vigorous counter attack once the route of German advance was known. Kitchener argued that the placement of the BEF at Mons would result in having to abandon its position and much of its supplies almost immediately as the Belgian Army would be unable to hold its ground versus the Germans, given the solid belief in fortress at the time it is not surprising that French and the British cabinet disagreed with Kitchener on this issue. After the BEF's first battles at Mons and Le Cateau, where as Kitchener predicted, it had to retreat from its position to avoid the danger of being flanked when the Belgian position failed, French was increasingly indecisive and more concerned with preserving his troops, even suggesting removing them to the Channel Ports, than aiding the French. He began a tentative withdrawal which threatend to break the line between French and Belgian armies and needed an unwanted emergency meeting with Kitchener on September 2, 1914 to reorganise his thinking and direct the counter-offensive at the First Battle of the Marne. French was particularly upset by the fact that Kitchener arrived wearing his Field Marshal's uniform, he felt Kitchener was implying that he was French's superior and not simply a cabinet member, a fact he mentioned in a letter to Winston Churchill. No one knows exactly what was said during the meeting, as neither man kept any record, but French became increasingly antagonistic towards Kitchener in the following months until he was eventually relieved of command in September 1915. 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Earl Kitchener The Right Honourable Horatio Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener, KG, KP, GCB, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, ADC, PC (24 June 1850–5 June 1916) was a British Field Marshal and statesman. ... Field Marshal Lord Haig Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE (19 June 1861 – 28 January 1928) was a British soldier and senior commander during World War I. He was commander of the British Expeditionary Force during the Battle of the Somme and the 3rd... The cathedral in Amiens Location within France Amiens is a city and commune in the north of France, 120 km north of Paris. ... Combatants Britain Germany Commanders Sir John French Alexander von Kluck Strength 4 divisions 8 divisions Casualties 1,600 5,000 (estimate) The Battle of Mons (Flemish name for Mons is Bergen) was the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force in World War I. Following the surrender of the... On the 25th of September, 1914, the British, French & Belgians retreated from the Battle of Mons & set up defensive positions in Le Cateau. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (246th in leap years). ... 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Combatants France United Kingdom Germany Commanders Joseph Joffre John French Helmuth von Moltke Karl von Bulow Alexander von Kluck Strength 1,071,000 1,485,000 Casualties Approximately 263,000 including; 80,000 French dead 1,701 British dead Approximately 250,000 total The First Battle of the Marne was... Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, FRS, PC (30 November 1874 – 24 January 1965) was a British politician, best known as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the Second World War. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


During the First Battle of Mons French issued a series of hasty orders to abandon positions and equipment which were ignored by his sub-ordinate in charge of the 2nd Corps of the BEF, General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien. Smith-Dorrien instead mounted a vigorous counter-attack, relieving the pressure and allowing the troops to re-organise, gather up their supplies and make a comfortable fighting withdrawal. Smith-Dorrien also ignored other orders from French which he considered to be unrealistic. He was removed from command after advocating a tactical withdrawal away from German lines, following the first use of poison gas by German troops. Several days after this French ordered the 2nd Army to perform the exact manoeuvre that Smith-Dorrien had recommended. Combatants Britain Germany Commanders Sir John French Alexander von Kluck Strength 4 divisions 8 divisions Casualties 1,600 5,000 (estimate) The Battle of Mons (Flemish name for Mons is Bergen) was the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force in World War I. Following the surrender of the... General Sir Horace Lockwood Smith-Dorrien (May 26, 1858–August 12, 1930) was a British soldier and commander of the British II Corps of the BEF during the Great War. ...


He remained in command as major trenching began and oversaw the fighting at Neuve Chapelle and Ypres that finally destroyed the last of the original BEF. In 1915 he declined to cooperate with the French and after the failures at Aubers Ridge and at Loos the British offensive operations were almost halted. In September 1915, he was replaced by Douglas Haig. He returned to England to be appointed Commander of the [[British Home Forces. It was a post he held until the end of the war. The Battles of Neuve Chapelle and Artois was a battle in the First World War. ... The First Battle of Ypres was the last major battle of the first year (1914) of World War I. This battle and the Battle of the Yser marked the end of the Race to the Sea where the Germans tried to reach the French Channel ports of Calais and Dunkerque... The Battle of Loos was one of the major British offensives mounted on the Western Front in 1915 during World War I. The battle was the British component of the combined Anglo-French offensive known as the Second Battle of Artois. ... Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig (June 19, 1861 - January 28, 1928) was a British soldier and senior commander during World War I. He had independent wealth: his family manufactured Haig & Haig whisky. ...


He was created Viscount French, of Ypres and of High Lake in the County of Roscommon, in January 1916. Lord French oversaw the suppression of the Irish uprising in 1916 and was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1918 until his retirement in 1921. In May 1922 he was created Earl of Ypres. 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Easter Proclamation, read by Pádraig Pearse outside the GPO at the start of the Easter Rising, 1916. ... Official standard of the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland The Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (plural: Lords Lieutenant), also known as the Judiciar in the early mediaeval period and as the Lord Deputy as late as the 17th century, was the Kings representative and head of the Irish executive during the... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Further reading

Holmes, Richard The Little Field Marshal: A Life of Sir John French Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2004 ISBN 0297846140 — Well-received modern account.


See also

Preceded by:
Sir William Nicholson
Chief of the Imperial General Staff
1912–1914
Succeeded by:
Sir Charles Douglas
Preceded by:
Commander of the British Expeditionary Force
1914–1915
Succeeded by:
Sir Douglas Haig
Preceded by:
The Lord Wimborne
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1918–1921
Succeeded by:
The Viscount Fitzalan of Derwent
Preceded by:
New Creation
Earl of Ypres
1922–1925
Succeeded by:
John French
Preceded by:
New Creation
Viscount French
1916–1925

  Results from FactBites:
 
John French, 1st Earl of Ypres - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (631 words)
John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, PC (28 September 1852–22 May 1925) was a British Field Marshal, the first commander of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) in World War I.
French was particularly upset by the fact that Kitchener arrived wearing his Field Marshal's uniform, he felt Kitchener was implying that he was French's superior and not simply a cabinet member, a fact he mentioned in a letter to Winston Churchill.
Lord French oversaw the suppression of the Irish uprising in 1916 and was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1918 until his retirement in 1921.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m