FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Franklin
John Franklin


In office
January 5, 1837 – August 21, 1843
Preceded by George Arthur
Succeeded by Sir John Eardley-Wilmot, 1st Baronet

Born 15 April 1786(1786-04-15)
Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England
Died 11 June 1847 (aged 61)
near King William Island, Canada
Spouse Eleanor Anne Porden & Lady Jane Franklin (nee Griffin)

Sir John Alexander Franklin, FRGS (April 15, 1786June 11, 1847) was a British Royal Navy officer and Arctic explorer who mapped almost two thirds of the northern coastline of North America. Franklin also served as governor of Tasmania for several years. His last expedition disappeared while attempting to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic. The entire crew perished from starvation and exposure after Franklin died and the expedition's icebound ships were abandoned in desperation. John Franklin is the name of: John Franklin (1786–1847), British royal naval officer John Hope Franklin (born 1915), United States historian John Rankin Franklin (1820 – 1878), U.S. Representative from Maryland Category: ... Download high resolution version (750x840, 656 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... List of Governors of Tasmania Note that Tasmania was called Van Diemens Land until 1855 (see History of Tasmania). ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Major General Sir George Arthur, 1st Baronet, (21 June 1784 – 19 September 1854) was Lieutenant Governor of British Honduras (1814–1822), Van Diemens Land (now Tasmania Australia) (1823–1837) and later Upper Canada (1838–1841). ... Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot, 1st Baronet (21 February 1783 – 3 February 1847) was a politician in the United Kingdom who served as Member of Parliament (MP) for North Warwickshire and then as Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemens Land (later called Tasmania). ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Spilsby is a market town in Lincolnshire, England, with a small population of a few thousand people. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... King William Island, Nunavut NASA Landsat satellite image of King William Island King William Island is a Canadian Arctic island, in the Nunavut Territory. ... Detail of portrait of Eleanor Anne Porden, by Mary Ann Flaxman Eleanor Anne Porden (July 14, 1795-February 22, 1825) was a British Romantic poet and the first wife of the explorer John Franklin. ... Portrait of Lady Jane Franklin Jane Griffin (Lady Franklin) (4 December 1791 – 18 July 1875), was an early Tasmanian pioneer, traveller and second wife of the explorer John Franklin. ... The Royal Geographical Society is a British learned society founded in 1830 with the name Geographical Society of London for the advancement of geographical science, under the patronage of King William IV. It absorbed the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa (founded by Sir Joseph... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... This list of explorers is sorted by surname. ... North American redirects here. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... For other uses, see Northwest Passage (disambiguation). ... The North, the Canadian Arctic defined politically. ...

Contents

Early life

Franklin was born in Spilsby, Lincolnshire, in 1786 and educated at King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth. He was the ninth of 12 children of a Lincolnshire shopkeeper. One of his sisters became the mother of Emily Tennyson, wife of the poet. Spilsby is a market town in Lincolnshire, England, with a population of 2,336. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... King Edward VI Grammar School (often shortened to KEVIGS or KEVIS) is one of many Grammar schools in the United Kingdom. ... Emily Tennyson (July 9, 1813 - August 10, 1896) was the wife of the poet, Alfred Tennyson, and a creative talent in her own right. ...


Franklin's father initially opposed his son's interest in a career at sea. However, Franklin was determined and his father reluctantly allowed him to go on a trial voyage with a merchant ship. This hardened young Franklin's resolve, so at the age of 14, his father secured him a Royal Navy appointment on HMS Polyphemus. Franklin was later present at a number of historic voyages and battles. These included the Battle of Copenhagen in 1801, an expedition to explore the coast of Australia on HMS Investigator with his uncle, Captain Matthew Flinders, a return to the Napoleonic Wars, serving aboard HMS Bellerophon at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, and he was at the Battle of New Orleans. This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... HMS Polyphemus a 64-gun 3rd rate ship of the line that fought at Copenhagen and Trafalgar. ... Combatants Great Britain Denmark-Norway Commanders Admiral Sir Hyde Parker Lord Nelson Olfert Fischer, Steen Bille Strength Nelson: 12 ships of the line, 5 frigates, 7 bombs, 6 others Parker (reserve): 8 ships of the line Fischer: 7 ships of the line, 10 others Bille: 17 ships, 1 land battery... Captain Matthew Flinders RN (16 March 1774 – 19 July 1814) was one of the most successful navigators and cartographers of his age. ... Napoleon Bonaparte on board the Bellerophon in Plymouth Sound by Sir Charles Lock Eastlake, painted 1815. ... Combatants United Kingdom First French Empire Kingdom of Spain Commanders Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson † Pierre Charles Silvestre de Villeneuve Strength 27 ships of the line and 6 others. ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ...


1819: First Arctic expedition

John Franklin first travelled to the Arctic in 1818 as a lieutenant under the command of David Buchan and became fascinated by it. He led a disastrous overland expedition into the Northwest Territories of Canada along the Coppermine River in 1819–22, losing 11 of the 20 men in his party. Most died of starvation, but there was also at least one murder and suggestions of cannibalism. The survivors were forced to eat lichen and even attempted to eat their own leather boots. This gained Franklin the nickname of "the man who ate his boots" in America. For the former United States territory, see Northwest Territory. ... Coppermine River is a river in Fort Smith and Kitikmeot regions of Nunavut in Canada. ... For other uses, see Lichen (disambiguation). ...


1823: Marriage and second Arctic expedition

In 1823, after returning to England, Franklin married the poet Eleanor Anne Porden. Their daughter, Eleanor Isabella, was born the following year. Eleanor (senior) died of tuberculosis in 1825, shortly after persuading her husband not to let her ill-health prevent him from setting off on another expedition to the Arctic. This expedition, a trip down the Mackenzie River to explore the shores of the Beaufort Sea, was better supplied and more successful than his last. 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Detail of portrait of Eleanor Anne Porden, by Mary Ann Flaxman Eleanor Anne Porden (July 14, 1795-February 22, 1825) was a British Romantic poet and the first wife of the explorer John Franklin. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... For other uses, see Mackenzie River (disambiguation). ... Approximate area of the Beaufort Sea, and the disputed waters The Beaufort Sea is a large body of water north of The Northwest Territories, the Yukon, and Alaska and west of Canadas arctic islands that is a part of the Arctic Ocean. ...


In 1828, he was knighted by George IV and in the same year married Jane Griffin, a friend of his first wife and a seasoned traveler who proved indomitable in the course of their life together. George IV redirects here. ... Jane Griffin (Lady Franklin) (4 December 1791 – 18 July 1875), was an early Tasmanian pioneer, traveller and second wife of the explorer John Franklin. ...


1836: Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania)

Franklin was appointed Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen's Land in 1836, but was removed from office in 1843. He did not endear himself with the local civil servants, who particularly disliked his humane ideals and his attempts to reform the Tasmanian penal colony. His wife, Lady Jane, was quite liberated for a woman of her day, known for "roughing it" to the extent that an expedition had to be mounted after she and Franklin became lost in the wild. Such exploits further distanced the couple from "proper" society, and may have contributed to Franklin's recall. Nevertheless, he was popular among the people of Tasmania. He is remembered by a significant landmark in the centre of Hobart—a statue of him dominates the park known as Franklin Square, which was the site of the original Government House. His wife worked to set up a college, a museum and botanical gardens. The village of Franklin, on the Huon River, is named in his honour, as is the Franklin River on the West Coast of Tasmania, one of the largest and wildest Tasmanian rivers. Standard of the Governor of Tasmania The Governor of Tasmania is the representatives in the Australian state of Tasmania of Australias head of state, Elizabeth II, Queen of Australia. ... Hobart is the state capital and most populous city of the Australian island state of Tasmania. ...


1845 Northwest Passage expedition

Main article: Franklin's lost expedition

Exploration of the Arctic coastal mainland after Franklin's second Arctic expedition had left less than 500 kilometres (311 mi) of unexplored Arctic coastline. The British decided to send a well-equipped Arctic expedition to complete the charting of the Northwest Passage. After Sir James Ross declined an offer to command the expedition, an invitation was extended to Franklin, who accepted despite his age, 59. A younger man, Captain James Fitzjames, was given command of HMS Erebus and Franklin was named the expedition commander. Captain Francis Rawdon Moira Crozier, who had commanded HMS Terror during the Ross 1841–44 Antarctic expedition, was appointed executive officer and commander of HMS Terror. Franklin was given command on February 7, 1845, and received official instructions on May 5, 1845.[1] Sir James Clark Ross (April 15, 1800 - April 3, 1862), was a British naval officer and explorer. ... Francis Rawdon Moira Crozier (September 1796–1848?) was an Irish-born British naval officer who participated in six exploratory expeditions to the Arctic and Antarctic. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


HMS Erebus at 370 long tons (380 MT) and HMS Terror at 340 long tons (350 MT) were sturdily built and were outfitted with recent inventions. These included steam engines from the London and Greenwich Railway that enabled the ships to make 4 knots (7.4 km/h) on their own power, a novel steam heating device for the comfort of the crew, a mechanism that enabled the iron rudder and propeller to be drawn into iron wells to protect them from damage, ships' libraries of more than 1,000 books, and three years' worth of conventionally preserved or tinned preserved food supplies. Unfortunately, the latter was supplied from a cut-rate provisioner who was awarded the contract only a few months before the ships were to sail. Though his "patent process" was sound, the haste with which he had to prepare thousands of cans of food led to sloppily-applied beads of solder on the cans' interior edges and allowed lead to leach into the food. Chosen by the Admiralty, most of the crew were Englishmen, many from the North Country, with a small number of Irishmen and Scotsmen. HMS Erebus was a Hecla-class bomb vessel constructed by the Royal Navy in Pembroke Dockyard, Wales in 1826. ... A long ton is the name used in the US for the unit called the ton in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements, as used (alongside the metric system) in the United Kingdom and to some extent in other Commonwealth countries. ... This article is about the metric tonne. ... HMS Terror in the Arctic HMS Terror was a bomb vessel designed by Sir Henry Peake and constructed by the Royal Navy in the Davy shipyard in Topsham, Devon. ... A knot is a unit of speed abbreviated kt or kn. ... Kilometres per hour (American spelling: kilometers per hour) is a unit of both speed (scalar) and velocity (vector). ...


The Franklin Expedition set sail from Greenhithe, England, on the morning of May 19, 1845, with a crew of 24 officers and 110 men. The ships traveled north to Aberdeen for supplies. From Scotland, the ships sailed to Greenland with HMS Rattler and a transport ship, Barretto Junior. After misjudging the location of Whitefish Bay, Disko Island, Greenland, the expedition backtracked and finally harbored in that far north outpost to prepare for the rest of their voyage. Five crew members were discharged and sent home on the Rattler and Barretto Junior, reducing the ships' final crew size to 129. The expedition was last seen by Europeans on July 26, 1845, when Captain Dannett of the whaler Prince of Wales encountered Terror and Erebus moored to an iceberg in Lancaster Sound. Greenhithe is a village in Dartford District of Kent, England. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... Disko Island lies off the west coast of Greenland in Davis Strait at a latitude of less than 70° North, and to the north of Disko Bay. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Lancaster Sound is a body of water lying between Devon Island and Baffin Island in Nunavut, Canada. ...


After two years and no word from the expedition, Franklin's wife urged the Admiralty to send a search party. Because the crew carried supplies for three years, the Admiralty waited another year before launching a search and offering a £20,000 reward for finding the expedition. The money and Franklin's fame led to many searches. At one point, ten British and two American ships, USS Advance and USS Rescue, headed for the Arctic. Eventually, more ships and men were lost looking for Franklin than in the expedition itself. Ballads such as "Lady Franklin's Lament", commemorating Lady Franklin's search for her lost husband, became popular.[2] In the summer of 1850, expeditions including three from England as well as one from the United States joined in the search. They converged off the east coast of Beechey Island, where the first relics of the Franklin expedition were found, including the graveyard of three Franklin Expedition crewmen. Jane Griffin (Lady Franklin) (4 December 1791 – 18 July 1875), was an early Tasmanian pioneer, traveller and second wife of the explorer John Franklin. ... The first USS Advance was a brigantine in the United States Navy which participated in an arctic rescue expedition. ... Lady Franklins Lament (a. ... Beechey Island, is an island located in the inland Arctic archipelago in Wellington Channel at 74 degrees 43 minutes North Latitude and 91 degrees 51 minutes West Longitude. ...


In 1854, explorer John Rae, while surveying the Boothia Peninsula for the Hudson's Bay Company, discovered more evidence of the Franklin party's fate, and over the next four decades, about 25 other searches added information. A century later, Owen Beattie, a University of Alberta professor of anthropology, began a 10-year series of scientific studies known as the "1845–48 Franklin Expedition Forensic Anthropology Project", showing that the Beechey Island crew had most likely died of pneumonia[3] and perhaps tuberculosis.[4] Toxicological reports indicated that lead poisoning was also a possible factor.[5][6] In addition, blade cut marks on the bones of some of the crew found on King William Island suggested that conditions had become so dire that some crew members resorted to cannibalism.[7] It appeared from these studies that a combination of bad weather, years locked in ice, disease including scurvy, poisoned food, botulism, and starvation had killed everyone in the Franklin party. John Rae John Rae (September 30, 1813 – July 22, 1893) was a Scottish explorer of the Arctic . ... Boothia and Melville peninsulas, Nunavut, Canada. ... Hudsons Bay Company (HBC; Compagnie de la Baie dHudson in French) is the oldest commercial corporation in North America and is one of the oldest in the world. ... The University of Alberta (U of A) is a public coeducational research university located in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Lead poisoning is a medical condition, also known as saturnism, plumbism or painters colic, caused by increased blood lead levels. ... King William Island, Nunavut NASA Landsat satellite image of King William Island King William Island is a Canadian Arctic island, in the Nunavut Territory. ... Cannibal redirects here. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ... Botulism (Latin, botulus, sausage) is a rare, but serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin, botulin, that is produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. ...


For years after the loss of the Franklin party, the Victorian media portrayed Franklin as a hero who led his men in the quest for the Northwest Passage. A statue of Franklin in his home town bears the inscription "Sir John Franklin — Discoverer of the North West Passage". Statues of Franklin outside the Athenaeum in London and in Tasmania bear similar inscriptions. Although the expedition's fate, including the possibility of cannibalism, was widely reported and debated, Franklin's standing with the public was not diminished. The mystery surrounding Franklin's last expedition was the subject of a 2006 episode of the Nova television series Arctic Passage and a 2007 documentary on Discovery HD Theater. The expedition has inspired many artistic works including a famous ballad, Lady Franklin's Lament, a verse play by Canadian poet Gwendolyn MacEwen, a children's book, a short story and essays by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, and several novels. The Athenaeum Club in 2006 as viewed from the south-east The Athenaeum Club in 1830. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Slogan or Nickname: Island of Inspiration; The Apple Isle; Holiday Isle Motto(s): Ubertas et Fidelitas (Fertility and Faithfulness) Other Australian states and territories Capital Hobart Government Constitutional monarchy Governor William Cox Premier Paul Lennon (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 5  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product... Artists conception of a white dwarf star accreting hydrogen from a larger companion A nova (pl. ... Arctic Passage is the U.S. title of a two-hour documentary on the Arctic explorers Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, co-produced by ITN Factual in Britain and NOVA/WGBH in the U.S. ITN Factual handled the production and filming; the film was directed by Louise Osmond... Discovery HD Theater is a high definition network from Discovery Communications Inc. ... Lady Franklins Lament (a. ... Gwendolyn MacEwen (September 1, 1941-November 29, 1987) was a Canadian novelist and poet. ... Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ...


References

  1. ^ Gibson, F.R.G.S., William (1937-06). "Sir John Franklin's Last Voyage: A brief history of the Franklin expedition and the outline of the researches which established the facts of its tragic outcome.". The Beaver: 48. 
  2. ^ M'Clintock, Francis L. (1860). The Voyage of the 'Fox' in the Arctic Seas. A Narrative of the Discovery of the Fate of Sir John Franklin and His Companions. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 336. 
  3. ^ Amy, Roger; Bhatnagar, Rakesh, Damkjar, Eric, Beattie, Owen (1986-07-15). "The last Franklin Expedition: report of a postmortem examination of a crew member". Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) 135: 115-117. 
  4. ^ Notman, Derek N.H.; Anderson, Lawrence, Beattie, Owen B., Amy, Roger (1987). "Arctic Paleoradiology: Portable Radiographic Examination of Two Frozen Sailors from the Franklin Expedition (1845-48)" (PDF). American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) 149: 347–350. American Roentgen Ray Society. 
  5. ^ Kowall, Walter; Beattie, Owen B., Baadsgaard, Halfdan (1990-01-25). "Did solder kill Franklin's men?". Nature 343 (6256): 319-320. 
  6. ^ Kowall, W.A.; Krahn, P.M., Beattie, O. B. (Received:1988-06-29). "Lead Levels in Human Tissues from the Franklin Forensic Project". International Journal Environmental Analytical Chemistry 35: 119-126. Gordon and Breach Science Publishers. 
  7. ^ Keenleyside, Anne; Bertulli, Margaret, Fricke, Henry C. (1997). "The Final Days of the Franklin Expedition: New Skeletal Evidence" (PDF). Arctic 50 (1): 36–46. The Arctic Institute of North America. ISSN: ISSN 0004-0843. 

Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ...

Bibliography

Non-fiction

  • Beattie, Owen, and Geiger, John (1989). Frozen in Time: Unlocking the Secrets of the Franklin Expedition. Saskatoon: Western Producer Prairie Books. ISBN 0-88833-303-X.
  • NOVA - Arctic Passage Part 1 - Prisoners Of The Ice (TV documentary). See also program transcript.
  • Frozen In Time: The Fate of the Franklin Expedition (Revised edition), Owen Beattie and John Geiger 2004
  • Unraveling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony. David C. Woodman
  • The Arctic Grail, Pierre Berton
  • Deadly Winter, Martyn Beardsley
  • The Royal Navy in Polar Exploration, Frobisher to Ross, E C Coleman 2006 ISBN 0-7524-3660-0
  • The Royal Navy in Polar Exploration, Franklin to Scott, E C Coleman 2006
  • British polar exploration and research : a historical and medallic record with biographies, 1818-1999 , Neville W. Poulsom & J. A. L. Myres (London: Savannah 2000)
  • Franklin Saga Deaths: A Mystery Solved? National Geographic Magazine, Vol 178, No 3, Sep 1990
  • The Arctic Fox - Francis Leopold McClintock, Discoverer of the fate of Franklin, David Murray, 2004. Cork: The Collins Press, ISBN 1-55002-523-6
  • To the Arctic!: The Story of Northern Exploration from Earliest Times, Jeannette Mirsky, 1970 ISBN 0-226-53179-1
  • Fatal Passage, Ken McGoogan
  • Lady Franklin's Revenge, Ken McGoogan

Nova is a popular science television series from the USA produced by WGBH and can be seen on PBS and in more than 100 countries. ... Arctic Passage is the U.S. title of a two-hour documentary on the Arctic explorers Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, co-produced by ITN Factual in Britain and NOVA/WGBH in the U.S. ITN Factual handled the production and filming; the film was directed by Louise Osmond... Pierre Francis Berton, CC, O.Ont, BA, D.Litt (July 12, 1920 – November 30, 2004) was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. ... It has been suggested that Fatal Passage be merged into this article or section. ... It has been suggested that Fatal Passage be merged into this article or section. ...

Fiction

The Discovery of Slowness (original German title Die Entdeckung der Langsamkeit) is a novel by Sten Nadolny, written under a double conceit: first, as a novelization of the life of British Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin, and second as a hymn of praise to slowness, a quality which Nadolnys... Sten Nadolny, German novelist, was born in 1942 in Zehdenick, Germany. ... The Rifles is a novel by American writer William T. Vollmann which was first published in 1994. ... William Tanner Vollmann (born July 28, 1959 in Los Angeles, California) is an American novelist, journalist, short story writer and essayist. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Robert Edric (born 1956) is the pseudonym of Gary Edric Armitage, a British novelist born in Sheffield. ...

External links

  • NOVA's companion website for Arctic Passage
  • Biography at the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online
  • The Fate of Franklin (Russell Potter)
  • The Life and Times of Sir John Franklin
  • List of artifacts recovered from the Franklin Expedition
  • Paper from the Universary of Calgary about the discovery of skeletal remains in 1992
  • Works by John Franklin at Project Gutenberg

Arctic Passage is the U.S. title of a two-hour documentary on the Arctic explorers Sir John Franklin and Roald Amundsen, co-produced by ITN Factual in Britain and NOVA/WGBH in the U.S. ITN Factual handled the production and filming; the film was directed by Louise Osmond... Project Gutenberg, abbreviated as PG, is a volunteer effort to digitize, archive and distribute cultural works. ...

Further reading

  • Alexander, Alison (editor) (2005)The Companion to Tasmanian HistoryCentre for Tasmanian Historical Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart. ISBN 186295223X.
  • Robson, L.L. (1983) A history of Tasmania. Volume 1. Van Diemen's Land from the earliest times to 1855Melbourne, Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195543645
Government offices
Preceded by
George Arthur
Lieutenant Governor of Van Diemen's Land
18371843
Succeeded by
Sir John Eardley-Wilmot

hm:John Franklin The Companion to Tasmanian History Was a volume produced in 2005 by the Centre for Tasmanian Historical Studies at the University of Tasmania in conjunction with the Tasmanian Government celebrations of the Bicentenary of Tasmania. ... Major General Sir George Arthur (1784-1854) was Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada (March 23, 1838-1839?). Sir George Arthur, Baronet. ... List of Governors of Tasmania Note that Tasmania was called Van Diemens Land until 1855 (see History of Tasmania). ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1843 (MDCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot Sir John Eardley Eardley-Wilmot, 1st Baronet (21 February 1783 – 3 February 1847) was a politician in the United Kingdom who served as Member of Parliament (MP) for North Warwickshire and then as Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemens Land (later called Tasmania). ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sir John Franklin (501 words)
Franklin, Sir John, 1786–1847, British explorer in N Canada whose disappearance caused a widespread search of the Arctic.
Although the geographical knowledge gained by the searchers was immense, no certain clues as to Franklin's fate were revealed until John Rae, in 1853–54, and Sir Francis McClintock, between 1857 and 1859, found evidence of the great arctic tragedy.
Relics and documents of the Franklin party and of later search expeditions have been found as recently as 1960, and the quest for Franklin's diaries is still being continued.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m