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Encyclopedia > John Eliot Gardiner
Sir John Eliot Gardiner at Rehearsal
Sir John Eliot Gardiner at Rehearsal

Sir John Eliot Gardiner CBE (born April 20, 1943, Fontmell Magna, Dorset, England) is an English conductor. He founded the Monteverdi Choir (1966), the English Baroque Soloists (1978) and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique (1990). Gardiner has recorded over 250 albums with these and other musical ensembles, most of which have been published by Deutsche Grammophon and Philips Classics. [1] John Eliot Gardiner is most famous for his interpretations of Baroque music on period instruments with the Monteverdi Choir and the English Baroque Soloists. His repertoire and discography are not limited to Early music. With the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique Gardiner has performed a wide range of Classical and Romantic music, including many works of Hector Berlioz and all of Beethoven's symphonies. A recording of the third symphony of the latter was used in a dramatisation by the BBC of Beethoven's writing of that symphony.[2] Gardiner has served as chief conductor of the North German Radio Symphony Orchestra and has appeared as guest conductor of some of the most famous orchestras including the Philharmonia, Boston, Cleveland, Royal Concertgebouw and Vienna Philharmonic orchestras. is the 110th day of the year (111th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fontmell Magna is a village in north Dorset, England, situated in the Blackmore Vale under Cranborne Chase on the A350 road five miles south of Shaftesbury and five miles north of Blandford Forum. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dÉ”.sÉ™t], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A conductor conducting at a ceremony A conductors score and batons Conducting is the act of directing a musical performance by way of visible gestures. ... The Monteverdi Choir was founded in 1964 by Sir John Eliot Gardiner for a performance of the Monteverdi Vespers (1610) in Kings College Chapel, Cambridge. ... The English Baroque Soloists is a chamber orchestra playing on period instruments, formed in 1978 by English conductor Sir John Eliot Gardiner. ... The Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, founded in 1990 by John Eliot Gardiner, performs Classical and Romantic music, using the principles and original instruments of historically informed performance. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who perform instrumental or vocal music. ... Deutsche Grammophon is a German classical record label. ... Philips Classics Records was started in the eighties as the new classics record label for Philips Records. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Period instruments, or playing on period instruments refers to performance of classical music on the original instruments of Renaissance, Baroque or Classicism, or using the historical replicas of the original instruments preserved in the museums. ... Early music is commonly defined as European classical music from the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Baroque. ... The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1750 to 1830, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ... Romanticism was an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe. ... Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie Fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Requiem of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... “Beethoven” redirects here. ... Eroica Symphony Title Page The Symphony No. ... Story dramatization is a process in which participants are invited to act out a story that their leader has shared with them. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The North German Radio Symphony Orchestra (NDR Symphony Orchestra, German Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks) is the most prestigious orchestra in the city of Hamburg and one of the most acclaimed orchestras in Germany. ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... The Philharmonia Orchestra is an orchestra based in London. ... The Boston Symphony Orchestra is one of the worlds premiere orchestras. ... The Cleveland Orchestra is one of the major symphony orchestras in the United States. ... The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (Koninklijk Concertgebouworkest in Dutch) is the best known and most respected orchestra in the Netherlands, and is generally considered to be among the worlds finest. ... The Vienna Philharmonic (in German: Wiener Philharmoniker) is an orchestra in Austria, regularly considered as one of the finest in the world. ...

Contents

Career

John Eliot Gardiner first took up the baton at the age of fifteen. As an undergraduate at King's College, Cambridge he studied history and Arabic. He toured the Middle East conducting the Oxford and Cambridge singers. During his time in Cambridge he founded, in 1964, his first musical ensemble, the Monteverdi Choir. With the Monteverdi Choir he made his conducting debut at the Wigmore Hall in London in 1966. To complement the Monteverdi Choir he formed the Monteverdi Orchestra in 1968, who played on modern instruments, but after changing to period instruments in 1977 they became known as the English Baroque Soloists. After graduating from King's College, Cambridge, he studied at King's College London with Thurston Dart and with the influential French music professor Nadia Boulanger. Baton can refer to: // Instruments Baton (via French bâton = stick from Late Latin bastum = stout staff, probably of Gaulish origin) refers to several types of cylindrical or tapered instruments composed of a wide variety of materials (finished, not wood in the natural state), with differing functions:- A baton (billy... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Arabic is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The Wigmore Halls entrance is framed by a distinctive iron and glass canopy Wigmore Hall is a recital hall that specialises in chamber music. ... The English Baroque Soloists is a chamber orchestra playing on period instruments, formed in 1978 by English conductor Sir John Eliot Gardiner. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Thurston Dart (September 3, 1921 - March 6, 1971), was an eminent British musicologist, conductor and keyboard player. ... Nadia Boulanger (September 16, 1887 – October 22, 1979) was an influential French composer, conductor, and music professor. ...


In 1969 Gardiner made his debut on the opera stage with a performance of Mozart's the Die Zauberflöte at the English National Opera. Four years later, in 1973, he first appeared at Covent Garden conducting Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride. In 1977 he transformed the Monteverdi Orchestra to the English Baroque Soloists; they made their debut with him in that year's Innsbruck Festival of Early Music, performing Händel's Acis and Galatea on period instruments. His American debut came in 1979 when he conducted the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Shortly thereafter he was the lead conductor of Canada's CBC Vancouver Orchestra. He held this post from 1980 to 1983.[3] Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (January 27, 1756 – December 5, 1791) was one of the most significant and influential of all composers of Western classical music. ... Die Zauberflöte, K. 620, (en: The Magic Flute) is an opera in two acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to a German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder. ... The London Coliseum, home of English National Opera English National Opera (ENO), located at the London Coliseum in St. ... The Floral Hall of the Royal Opera House The Royal Opera House is a performing arts venue in London. ... Christoph Willibald Gluck (July 2, 1714 – November 15, 1787) was a German composer. ... Iphigénie en Tauride (Iphigeneia in Tauris) is an opera by Christoph Willibald Gluck in four acts. ... Innsbruck is a city in western Austria, and the capital of the federal state of Tyrol. ... HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... The Dallas Symphony Orchestra is an American orchestra which plays its concerts in the Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas, Texas. ... The CBC Radio Orchestra is the orchestra of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that is based in Vancouver. ...


After his period with the CBC Vancouver Orchestra, Gardiner went to France. From 1983 to 1988 he was Music Director of the Opéra National de Lyon. During his period with the Opéra he founded an entirely new orchestra.[4]During his time with the Opéra National de Lyon Gardiner was also Artistic Director of the Göttingen Handel Festival (1981 until 1990). [5] In 1989 the Monteverdi Choir had its 25th anniversary, touring the world giving performances of Monteverdi's Vespro della Beata Vergine 1610. In 1990, Gardiner formed a new period-instrument orchestra, the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, to perform music of the 19th century. From 1991 until 1994 he was principal conductor of the North German Radio Symphony Orchestra. Opéra National de Lyon is an opera house in Lyon which seats 1,350. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For the composer see Claudio Monteverdi For the Swiss automobile brand created by Peter Monteverdi, see Monteverdi (car) Monteverde Monte Verde Category: ... Vespro della Beata Vergine 1610 (SV 206 and 206a, Vespers for the Blessed Virgin, 1610), or simply the Vespers of 1610, as it is commonly called, is a musical composition by Claudio Monteverdi. ... The North German Radio Symphony Orchestra (NDR Symphony Orchestra, German Sinfonieorchester des Norddeutschen Rundfunks) is the most prestigious orchestra in the city of Hamburg and one of the most acclaimed orchestras in Germany. ...


In the 1990s he undertook more world tours with his ensembles, including:

  • A European tour in 1993 with the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique featured Berlioz's rediscovered Messe solennelle. Beginning in Bremen, Germany the tour ended with a recorded performance in Westminster Cathedral, London 1993. [6][7]
  • In 2000, Gardiner set out on his Bach Cantata Pilgrimage, performing, over a 52-week period, all of Bach's sacred cantatas in churches around Europe and the United States.[8]
  • In late 2004, Gardiner toured Spain with the Monteverdi Choir performing pieces from the Codex Compostelanus in cathedrals and churches along the Camino de Santiago.[9]

Portrait of Berlioz by Signol, 1832 Louis Hector Berlioz (December 11, 1803 – March 8, 1869) was a French Romantic composer best known for the Symphonie Fantastique, first performed in 1830, and for his Requiem of 1837, with its tremendous resources that include four antiphonal brass choirs. ... This article is about the city in Germany. ... Westminster Cathedral from Victoria Street Westminster Cathedral in London, England, is the mother church of the Roman Catholic community in England and Wales and the Metropolitan Church and Cathedral for the Archbishop of Westminster. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... External links Official city site Live Cam of Obradoiro Fa ade Confraternity of St. ...

Honours and awards

Gardiner has received a variety of honours and awards.[10] In particular:

An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... The University of Lyon is a university in Lyon, France Categories: Substubs ... This article is about the year 1987. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Cremona is a city in northern Italy, situated in Lombardy, on the left shore of the Po river in the middle of the Pianura padana (Po valley). ... Monteverdi redirects here. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Family

Gardiner was married to violinist Elizabeth Wilcock from 1981 to 1997; they have three daughters. In 2001 he married Isabella de Sabata, granddaughter of conductor Victor de Sabata.[18] In his spare time, Gardiner runs an organic farm in North Dorset, which was set up by his great uncle, composer Henry Balfour Gardiner. Vittorio (Victor) De Sabata (April 10, 1892 – December 11, 1967) was an Italian conductor and composer. ... Organic farming is a form of agriculture which excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, plant growth regulators, livestock feed additives, and genetically modified organisms. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... Henry Balfour Gardiner (1877-1950) was an English musician, composer and teacher. ...


References

  1. ^ Monteverdi Productions website, <http://www.monteverdi.co.uk/about_us/jeg.cfm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  2. ^ BBC (May 15, 2003). "Ian Hart is Beethoven in unique drama of the first performance of the Eroica Symphony". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  3. ^ CBC Radio Orchestra, <http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=U1ARTU0000638>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  4. ^ The Opera House Orchestra, <http://www.lyon.fr/vdl/sections/en/culture/opera_1/>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  5. ^ Göttingen Händelfestspiele (2007). "A Brief History of the Göttingen Händelfestspiele" (PDF). Retrieved on 2007-05-17.
  6. ^ Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique, <http://www.answers.com/topic/orchestre-revolutionnaire-et-romantique/>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  7. ^ Berlioz: Messe solennelle, <http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0259887/>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  8. ^ Bach Cantata Pilgrimage, <http://www.monteverdiproductions.co.uk/about_us/bcp.cfm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  9. ^ Santiago Pilgrimage 2004 Website, <http://www.monteverdipilgrimage.co.uk/>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  10. ^ John Eliot Gardiner (Bio), <http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Bio/Gardiner-John-Eliot.htm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  11. ^ Monteverdi Productions website, <http://www.monteverdi.co.uk/about_us/jeg.cfm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  12. ^ London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 51981, page 7, December 29, 1989. Retrieved on 2007-12-12.
  13. ^ Monteverdi Productions website, <http://www.monteverdi.co.uk/about_us/jeg.cfm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  14. ^ Grammy Award Winners, <http://www.grammy.com/GRAMMY_Awards/Winners/Results.aspx?title=gardiner&winner=&year=0&genreID=0&hp=1>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  15. ^ Honours and Awards — Central Chancery of the Orders of Knighthood. London Gazette (September 14, 1999).
  16. ^ Grammy Award Winners, <http://www.grammy.com/GRAMMY_Awards/Winners/Results.aspx?title=gardiner&winner=&year=0&genreID=0&hp=1>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  17. ^ Monteverdi Productions website, <http://www.monteverdi.co.uk/about_us/jeg.cfm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 
  18. ^ John Eliot Gardiner - gewend zijn eigen beslissingen te nemen (Dutch), <http://www.audio-muziek.nl/interviews/gardiner01_interview.htm>. Retrieved on 17 May 2007 

For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Gazette , front page from Monday 3 - 10 September 1666, reporting on the Great Fire of London. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ...

Media

Sir Gardiner directs J.S.Bach BWV 248. Video on youtube


External links

Preceded by
no predecessor
Music Director, Opéra National de Lyon
1983–1988
Succeeded by
Kent Nagano
Preceded by
Günter Wand
Chief Conductor, North German Radio Symphony Orchestra
1991–1994
Succeeded by
Herbert Blomstedt

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Eliot Gardiner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (501 words)
John Eliot Gardiner made his London opera debut with Die Zauberflöte in 1969 at the English National Opera, and he first appeared at Covent Garden in 1973 conducting Gluck's Iphigénie en Tauride.
In 1998, John Eliot Gardiner was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.
Gardiner was married to violinist Elizabeth Wilcock from 1981 to 1997; they had three daughters.
John Eliot Gardiner (Conductor) - Short Biography (511 words)
John Eliot Gardiner has undertaken numerous tours with the Monteverdi Choir and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique.
John Eliot Gardiner holds an honorary doctorate from the University of Lyons (1987) and was named "Officier dans l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres" (1988) and "Commander of the British Empire" (1990).
John Eliot Gardiner received a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II at the June Birthday Honours in 1998.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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