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Encyclopedia > John Edwards
John Edwards
John Edwards

In office
January 6, 1999 – January 3, 2005
Preceded by Lauch Faircloth
Succeeded by Richard Burr

Election date
November 2, 2004
Running mate John Kerry
Opponent(s) Dick Cheney (R).
Incumbent Dick Cheney (R)

Born June 10, 1953 (1953-06-10) (age 54)
Seneca, South Carolina
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse Elizabeth Edwards
Alma mater North Carolina State University
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Profession Attorney, Politician
Religion United Methodist
Signature

Johnny Reid "John" Edwards[1] (born June 10, 1953) is an American politician who served one term as U.S. Senator from North Carolina. He was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 2004, and was a candidate for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination through the January primaries. John Edwards may refer to one of the following persons: John Edwards, a former US Senator from North Carolina, and candidate for Vice President of the United States in the U.S. presidential election, 2004 John Edwards, a US Representative from Pennsylvania from 1837 to 1842 John Edwards (1795-1893... Image File history File links John_Edwards,_official_Senate_photo_portrait. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Stub | 1928 births | United States Senators ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... GOP redirects here. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seneca, SC welcome sign on Highway 123 Seneca is a city in Oconee County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Mary Elizabeth Anania Edwards (born July 3, 1949, in Jacksonville, Florida) is an attorney. ... Alma mater is Latin for nourishing mother. It was used in ancient Rome as a title for the mother goddess, and in Medieval Christianity for the Virgin Mary. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... An attorney is someone who represents someone else in the transaction of business: For attorney-at-law, see lawyer, solicitor, barrister or civil law notary. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This article is about the current Christian denomination based in the United States. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[2] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25...


He defeated incumbent Republican Lauch Faircloth in North Carolina's 1998 Senate election and toward the end of his six-year term sought the Democratic presidential nomination in the 2004 presidential election. GOP redirects here. ... Categories: Stub | 1928 births | United States Senators ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1998 was a roughly even contest between the Republican and Democratic parties. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ...


He eventually became the 2004 Democratic candidate for Vice President, the running mate of presidential nominee Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts. After Edwards and Kerry lost the election to incumbents George W. Bush and Dick Cheney, Edwards began working full time at the One America Committee, a political action committee he established in 2001, and was appointed director of the Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Law. He was also a consultant for Fortress Investment Group LLC. John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... University of North Carolina School of Law is a school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Fortress Investment Group (NYSE: FIG) is a New York, NY-based asset management firm which manages private equity, hedge funds and real estate-related investments. ...

Contents

Early life, education, and family

Edwards was born June 10, 1953 to Wallace Reid Edwards and Catharine Juanita "Bobbie" Edwards (née Wade) in Seneca, South Carolina. The family moved several times during Edwards' childhood, eventually settling in Robbins, North Carolina, where his father worked as a textile mill floor worker, eventually promoted to supervisor; his mother had a roadside antique finishing business and then worked as a postal letter carrier when his father left his job.[2] is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... Seneca, SC welcome sign on Highway 123 Seneca is a city in Oconee County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... Robbins is a city located in Moore County, North Carolina. ... The cotton mill is a type of factory that was created to house spinning and weaving machinery. ... For other uses, see Mail (disambiguation). ...


A football star in high school,[3] Edwards was the first person in his family to attend college. He attended Clemson University and transferred to North Carolina State University. Edwards graduated with high honors earning a bachelor's degree in textile technology in 1974, and later earned his Juris Doctor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) with honors. Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... J.D. redirects here. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ...


While at UNC, he met Elizabeth Anania, who is four years his senior. They married in 1977 and would eventually have four children (Wade in 1979, Cate in 1982, Emma Claire in 1998, and Jack in 2000). Their son Wade was killed in a car accident when strong winds swept his Jeep off a North Carolina highway in 1996. Edwards and his wife began the Wade Edwards Foundation in their son's memory; the purpose of the nonprofit organization is "to reward, encourage, and inspire young people in the pursuit of excellence." The Foundation funded the Wade Edwards Learning Lab at Wade's high school, Broughton High School in Raleigh, along with scholarship competitions and essay awards. Just weeks before Wade died, he had been honored at the White House by First Lady Hillary Clinton for an essay he wrote on entering the voting booth with his father.[4][5] Mary Elizabeth Anania Edwards (born July 3, 1949, in Jacksonville, Florida) is an attorney. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former United States Senator from North Carolina. ... Catharine Elizabeth Cate Edwards (born 4 March 1982) is the oldest daughter of John Edwards, the United States Democratic Partys 2004 nominee for Vice President and Elizabeth Anania Edwards. ... Broughton High School is a name shared by a number of schools: Needham B. Broughton High School, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA Broughton High School, Edinburgh, Scotland Categories: | ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ...


On November 3, 2004, Elizabeth Edwards revealed that she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She was treated via chemotherapy and radiotherapy,[6] and continued to work within the Democratic Party and her husband's One America Committee. On March 22, 2007, during his campaign for the 2008 Democratic nomination for the presidency, Edwards and his wife announced that her cancer had returned; she was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer, with newly discovered metastases to the bone and possibly to her lung.[7][8] They said that the cancer was "no longer curable, but is completely treatable"[9] and that they planned to continue campaigning together with an occasional break when she requires treatment.[10][7] is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... Chemotherapy, in its most general sense, refers to treatment of disease by chemicals that kill cells, specifically those of micro-organisms or cancer. ... Radiation therapy (or radiotherapy) is the medical use of ionizing radiation as part of cancer treatment to control malignant cells (not to be confused with radiology, the use of radiation in medical imaging and diagnosis). ... One America Committee is a Political Action Committee founded by Senator John Edwards during 2004 presidential election for supporting Democrat candidates around country and based on Sen. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The stage of a cancer is a descriptor (usually numbers I to IV) of how much the cancer has spread. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... For the musical composition, see Metastasis (Xenakis composition). ...


Legal career

Four Trials by John Edwards
Four Trials by John Edwards

After law school, Edwards clerked for a federal judge and in 1978 became an associate at the Nashville law firm of Dearborn & Ewing, doing primarily trial work, defending a Nashville bank and other corporate clients. The Edwards family returned to North Carolina in 1981, settling in the capital of Raleigh where he joined the firm of Tharrington, Smith & Hargrove.[11] This work is copyrighted. ... This work is copyrighted. ... Cover of the hardcover edition. ... In the United States, Canada and Brazil, a law clerk is a person who provides assistance to a judge in researching issues before the court and in writing opinions. ... Nashville redirects here. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ...


In 1984 Edwards was assigned to a medical malpractice lawsuit that had been perceived to be unwinnable; the firm had only accepted it as a favor to an attorney and state senator who did not want to keep it. Nevertheless, Edwards won a $3.7 million verdict on behalf of his client, who had suffered permanent brain and nerve damage after a doctor prescribed a drug overdose of the anti-alcoholism drug Antabuse during alcohol aversion therapy.[12] In other cases, Edwards sued the American Red Cross three times, alleging transmission of AIDS through tainted blood products, resulting in a confidential settlement each time, and defended a North Carolina newspaper against a libel charge.[11] Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Disulfiram is a drug used to support the treatment of chronic alcoholism by producing an acute sensitivity to alcohol). ... A WWII-era poster encouraged American women to volunteer for the Red Cross as part of the war effort. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


In 1985, Edwards represented a five-year-old child born with cerebral palsy whose doctor did not choose to perform an immediate Caesarean delivery when a fetal monitor showed she was in distress. Edwards won a $6.5 million verdict for his client, but five weeks later, the presiding judge sustained the verdict but overturned the award on grounds that it was "excessive" and that it appeared "to have been given under the influence of passion and prejudice," adding that in his opinion "the evidence was insufficient to support the verdict." He offered the plaintiffs $3.25 million, half of the jury's award, but the child's family appealed the case and received $4.25 million in a settlement.[11] Winning this case established the North Carolina precedent of physician and hospital liability for failing to determine if the patient understood the risks of a particular procedure.[12] A caesarean section (AE cesarean section), or c-section, is a form of childbirth in which a surgical incision is made through a mothers abdomen (laparotomy) and uterus (hysterotomy) to deliver one or more babies. ...


After this trial, Edwards gained national attention as a plaintiff's lawyer. He filed at least twenty similar lawsuits in the years following and achieved verdicts and settlements of more than $60 million for his clients. These successful lawsuits were followed by similar ones across the country. When asked about an increase in Caesarean deliveries nationwide, perhaps to avoid similar medical malpractice lawsuits, Edwards said, "The question is, would you rather have cases where that happens instead of having cases where you don't intervene and a child either becomes disabled for life or dies in utero?"[11]


In 1993, Edwards began his own firm in Raleigh (now named Kirby & Holt) with a friend, David Kirby. He became known as the top plaintiffs' attorney in North Carolina.[11] The biggest case of his legal career was a 1997 product liability lawsuit against Sta-Rite, the manufacturer of a defective pool drain cover. The case involved Valerie Lakey a three-year-old girl[13] who was disemboweled by the suction power of the pool drain pump when she sat on an open pool drain whose protective cover other children at the pool had removed, after the swim club had failed to install the cover properly. Despite 12 prior suits with similar claims, Sta-Rite continued to make and sell drain covers lacking warnings. Sta-Rite protested that an additional warning would have made no difference because the pool owners already knew the importance of keeping the cover secured.


In his closing arguments, Edwards spoke to the jury for an hour and a half and referenced his son, Wade, who had been killed shortly before testimony began. Mark Dayton, editor of North Carolina Lawyers Weekly, would later call it "the most impressive legal performance I have ever seen."[14] The jury awarded the family $25 million, the largest personal injury award in North Carolina history. The company settled for the $25 million while the jury was deliberating additional punitive damages, rather than risk losing an appeal. For their part in this case, Edwards and law partner David Kirby earned the Association of Trial Lawyers of America's national award for public service.[12] The family said that they hired Edwards over other attorneys because he alone had offered to accept a smaller percentage as fee unless the award was unexpectedly high, while all of the other lawyers they spoke with said they required the full one-third fee. The size of the jury award was unprecedented, and Edwards did receive the standard one-third plus expenses fee typical of contingency cases. The family was so impressed with his intelligence and commitment[11] that they volunteered for his Senate campaign the next year. Punitive damages are damages awarded to a successful plaintiff in a civil action, over and above the amount of compensatory damages, to: punish the conduct of the civil defendant; deter the civil defendant from committing the invidious act again; and deter others from doing the same thing. ... The Association of Trial Lawyers of America, or ATLA, is the leading organization for lawyers representing plaintiffs in the United States. ...


After Edwards won a large verdict against a trucking company whose worker had been involved in a fatal accident, the North Carolina legislature passed a law prohibiting such awards unless the employee's actions had been specifically sanctioned by the company.[11]


In December 2003, during his first presidential campaign, Edwards (with John Auchard) published Four Trials, a biographical book focusing on cases from his legal career. The success of the Sta-Rite case and his son's death (Edwards had hoped his son would eventually join him in private law practice) prompted Edwards to leave the legal profession and seek public office. John Auchard is a professor of English at the University of Mayland, College Park. ... Cover of the hardcover edition. ...


Senate career

Senator Edwards on Meet The Press
Senator Edwards on Meet The Press

Edwards won election to the U.S. Senate in 1998 as a Democrat running against incumbent Republican Senator Lauch Faircloth. Despite originally being the underdog, Edwards beat Faircloth by 51.2% to 47.0% — a margin of some 83,000 votes. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 388 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (882 × 1362 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 388 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (882 × 1362 pixels, file size: 1. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Categories: Stub | 1928 births | United States Senators ...


During President Bill Clinton's 1999 impeachment trial in the Senate, Edwards was responsible for the deposition of witnesses Monica Lewinsky and fellow Democrat Vernon Jordan, Jr.. During the 2000 presidential campaign, Edwards was on Democratic nominee Al Gore's vice presidential nominee "short list" (along with John Kerry and Joe Lieberman, Gore's eventual pick).[15] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The impeachment trial of President Clinton in 1999, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... In law, a deposition is evidence given under oath and recorded for use in court at a later date. ... Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973) is an American woman with whom the former United States President Bill Clinton admitted to having had an inappropriate relationship[1] while Lewinsky worked at the White House in 1995 and 1996. ... Vernon Eulion Jordan, Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ...


In his time in the Senate, Edwards co-sponsored 203 bills.[16] Among them was Lieberman's 2002 Iraq War Resolution (S.J.Res.46) which he co-sponsored along with 15 other senators, but which did not go to a vote;[17] he voted for replacement resolution (H.J Res. 114) in the full Senate to authorize the use of military force against Iraq, which passed by a vote of 77 to 23,[18] saying on October 10, 2002 that "Almost no one disagrees with these basic facts: that Saddam Hussein is a tyrant and a menace; that he has weapons of mass destruction and that he is doing everything in his power to get nuclear weapons; that he has supported terrorists; that he is a grave threat to the region, to vital allies like Israel, and to the United States; and that he is thwarting the will of the international community and undermining the United Nations' credibility."[19] He defended his vote on an October 10, 2004 appearance on Meet the Press, saying "I would have voted for the resolution knowing what I know today, because it was the right thing to do to give the president the authority to confront Saddam Hussein...I think Saddam Hussein was a very serious threat. I stand by that, and that's why [John Kerry and I] stand behind our vote on the resolution".[20] However, he subsequently changed his mind about the war and apologized for that military authorization vote. Edwards also voted in favor of the Patriot Act. For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ... Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006) was the fifth President of Iraq and Chairman of the Iraqi Revolutionary Command Council from 1979 until his overthrow by US forces in 2003. ... This article needs cleanup. ...


Among other positions, Edwards was generally pro-choice and supported affirmative action, and the death penalty. One of his first sponsored bills was the Fragile X Research Breakthrough Act of 1999.[21] He was also the first person to introduce comprehensive anti-spyware legislation with the Spyware Control and Privacy Protection Act.[22] He advocated rolling back the Bush administration's tax cuts and ending mandatory minimum sentencing for non-violent offenders.[23] Edwards generally supported expanding legal immigration to the United States while working with Mexico to provide better border security and stop illegal trafficking.[23][24] Issues of discussion Pro-choice describes the political and ethical view that a woman should have complete control over her fertility and pregnancy. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Capital punishment is a controversial issue in the United States and, indeed, in most of the world, with many prominent organizations and individuals participating in the debate. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


Edwards served on the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and U.S. Senate Committee on Judiciary, and was a member of the New Democrat Coalition. The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is dedicated to overseeing the American Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the U.S. federal government who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The New Democrat Coalition is an organization within the United States House of Representatives, currently chaired by Representatives Jim Davis of Florida, Ron Kind of Wisconsin, and Adam Smith of Washington. ...


Before the 2004 Senate election, Edwards announced his retirement from the Senate and supported Erskine Bowles, former White House Chief of Staff, as the successor to his seat; Bowles, however, was defeated by Republican Richard Burr in the election.  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The United States Senate election, 2004 was an election for one-third of the seats in the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of George W. Bush as president and the United States House election, as well as many... Erskine Boyce Bowles is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ...


2004 presidential campaign

In 2000, Edwards unofficially began his presidential campaign when he began to seek speaking engagements in Iowa, the site of the nation's first party caucuses. On January 2, 2003, Edwards began fundraising without officially campaigning by forming an exploratory committee. On September 15, 2003, Edwards fulfilled a promise he made a year earlier as a guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart to unofficially announce his intention to seek the 2004 Democratic Presidential nomination. The next morning, Edwards made the announcement officially from his hometown. He declined to run for reelection to the Senate in order to focus on his presidential run. Edwards' campaign was chaired by North Carolina Democratic activist Ed Turlington. The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Stephen Colbert and Jon Stewart on the set of The Daily Show The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, also known as TDS to fans and staffers) is a half-hour satirical fake news program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network in... Ten candidates vied for the nomination, including retired four-star general Wesley Clark, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean, John Edwards, and John Kerry. ... Ed Turlington is an American lawyer and Democratic Party activist. ...


As Edwards had been building support essentially since his election to the Senate, he led the initial campaign fundraising, amassing over $7 million during the first quarter of 2003 – more than half of which came from individuals associated with the legal profession, particularly Edwards' fellow trial lawyers, their families, and employees.[25]


Edwards' "stump speech" spoke of two Americas, with one composed of the wealthy and privileged, and the other of the hard-working common man,[26] causing the media to often characterize Edwards as a populist.[27][28] Look up Populism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Edwards struggled to gain substantial support, but his poll numbers began to rise steadily weeks before the Iowa caucuses. Edwards had a surprising second place finish with the support of 32% of delegates, behind only John Kerry's 39% and ahead of former front-runner Howard Dean at 18%. One week later in the New Hampshire primary, Edwards finished in fourth place behind Kerry, Dean and Wesley Clark, with 12%. During the February 3 primaries, Edwards won the South Carolina primary,[29] lost to Clark in Oklahoma, and lost to Kerry in the other states. Edwards garnered the second largest number of second-place finishes, again falling behind Clark.[30] John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... The New Hampshire primary is the first of a number of statewide political party primary elections held in the United States every four years, as part of the process of the Democratic and Republican parties choosing their candidate for the presidential elections on the subsequent November. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ...

Edwards on the campaign trail in 2004

Dean withdrew from the contest, leaving Edwards the only major challenger to Kerry. In the Wisconsin primary on February 17, Edwards finished second to Kerry with 34% of the vote. Summary John Edwards shakes hands with supporters after speaking at a University of Maine campaign stop in Orono, Maine. ... Summary John Edwards shakes hands with supporters after speaking at a University of Maine campaign stop in Orono, Maine. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Edwards largely avoided attacking Kerry until a February 29, 2004 debate in New York, where he characterized him as a "Washington insider" and mocked Kerry's plan to form a committee to examine trade agreements. February 29 is a day added into a leap year of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A trade pact is a wide ranging tax, tariff and trade pact that usually also includes investment guarantees. ...


In the Super Tuesday primaries on March 2, Kerry finished well ahead in nine of the ten states voting, and Edwards' campaign ended. In Georgia, Edwards finished only slightly behind Kerry but, failing to win a single state, chose to withdraw from the race. He announced his official withdrawal at a Raleigh, North Carolina press conference on March 3. Edwards' withdrawal made major media outlets relatively early on the evening of Super Tuesday, at about 6:30 p.m. CST, before polls had closed in California and before caucuses in Minnesota had even begun. It is thought that the withdrawal influenced many people in Minnesota to vote for other candidates, which may partially account for the strong Minnesota finish of Dennis Kucinich.[original research?] Edwards did win the presidential straw poll conducted by the Independence Party of Minnesota. In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of this name, see Raleigh. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Dennis John Kucinich (IPA: ) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... A straw poll is an informal type of voting where the results of the poll have little or no direct results, other than to gauge opinion. ... The Independence Party of Minnesota (often abbreviated MNIP, IP or IPM), formerly the Reform Party of Minnesota, is the third largest political party in Minnesota, behind the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL) and Republican Party. ...


After withdrawing from the race, he went on to win the April 17 Democratic caucuses in his home state of North Carolina,[31] making him the only Democratic candidate besides Kerry to win nominating contests in two states. is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


2004 vice presidential nomination

Kerry/Edwards campaign logo
Kerry/Edwards campaign logo

On July 6, 2004 Kerry announced that Edwards would be his running mate; the decision was widely hailed in public opinion polls and by Democratic leaders. Though many Democrats supported Edwards' nomination, others criticized the selection for Edwards' perceived lack of experience. The nomination caused the Chamber of Commerce network to throw its support to George W. Bush due to Edwards' opposition to tort reform.[32] In the vice presidential debate, Dick Cheney incorrectly told Edwards they never met due to Edwards' frequent absences from the Senate. The media later found at least one videotape of Cheney and Edwards meeting. This article is about the presidential campaign of John Kerry, U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and the nominee of the Democratic Party to challenge Republican incumbent President George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential election on November 2, 2004. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Chamber of Commerce is the worlds largest not-for-profit business federation, representing 3,000,000 businesses (via its Federation of local chambers and association members. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The terminology tort reform describes a change in United States civil law system to improve litigation efficiency or reduce litigations adverse effects on the economy. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ...


Kerry's campaign advisor Bob Shrum later reported in Time magazine that Kerry said he wished he'd never picked Edwards, and the two have since stopped speaking to each other.[33] Edwards said in his concession speech, "You can be disappointed, but you cannot walk away. This fight has just begun." Robert M. Bob Shrum, (born 1943) is an American political consultant. ...


Post-Senate activities

The day after his concession speech, he announced his wife Elizabeth had been diagnosed with breast cancer. Edwards told interviewer Larry King that he doubted he would return to practice as a trial lawyer and showed no interest in succeeding Terry McAuliffe as the Democratic National Committee chairman. This article is about the television show host. ... Terry McAuliffe Terence Richard Terry McAuliffe (b. ... The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal organization governing the United States Democratic Party on a day to day basis. ...


In February 2005, Edwards headlined the "100 Club" Dinner, a major fundraiser for the New Hampshire Democratic Party. That same month, Edwards was appointed as director of the Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for studying ways to move people out of poverty. That fall, Edwards toured ten major universities in order to promote "Opportunity Rocks!", a program aimed at getting youth involved to fight poverty. For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ...


On March 21, 2005, Edwards recorded his first podcast[34] with his wife. Several months later, in August, Edwards delivered an address to a potential key supporter in the Iowa caucus, the AFL-CIO in Waterloo, Iowa. is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A podcast is a series of digital-media files which are distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and computers. ... Mary Elizabeth Anania Edwards (born July 3, 1949) is an attorney and the wife of John Edwards (former U.S. Senator from North Carolina and 2004 Democratic vice-presidential candidate). ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... Waterloo is the county seat of Black Hawk County, Iowa, United States. ...


In the following month, Edwards sent an email to his supporters and announced that he opposed the nomination of Judge John Roberts to become Chief Justice of the United States. He was also opposed to the nomination of Justice Samuel Alito as an Associate Justice. E-mail, or email, is short for electronic mail and is a method of composing, sending, and receiving messages over electronic communication systems. ... [edit] John G. Roberts, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ...


During the summer and fall of 2005, he visited homeless shelters and job training centers and spoke at events organized by ACORN, the NAACP and the SEIU. He spoke in favor of an expansion of the earned income tax credit, a crackdown on predatory lending, an increase in the capital gains tax rate, housing vouchers for racial minorities (to integrate upper-income neighborhoods), and a program modeled on the Works Progress Administration to rehabilitate the Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina. In Greene County, North Carolina he unveiled the pilot program for College for Everyone, an educational measure he promised during his presidential campaign, in which prospective college students would receive a scholarship for their first year in exchange for ten hours of work a week. Homeless shelters are temporary residences for homeless people. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... Service Employees International Union (SEIU) is a labor union representing 1. ... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income married or single working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... Predatory lending is a pejorative term used to describe practices of some lenders. ... For all other forms of taxation, see tax Tax rates around the world Tax revenue as % of GDP Economic policy Monetary policy Central bank   Money supply Fiscal policy Spending   Deficit   Debt Trade policy Tariff   Trade agreement Finance Financial market Financial market participants Corporate   Personal Public   Banking   Regulation        A capital gains... The Housing Choice Voucher Program is a type of Federal assistance provided by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) dedicated to sponsoring subsidized housing for low-income families and individuals. ... “Minority” redirects here. ... WPA Graphic The Works Progress Administration (later Work Projects Administration, abbreviated WPA), was created on May 6, 1935 by Presidential order (Congress funded it annually but did not set it up). ... States that border the Gulf of Mexico are shown in red The Gulf Coast region of the United States comprises the coasts of states which border the Gulf of Mexico. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Greene County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


Edwards was co-chair of a Council on Foreign Relations task force on United States-Russia relations alongside Republican Jack Kemp, a former congressman, Cabinet official and vice presidential nominee.[35] The task force issued its report in March 2006.[36] On July 12, the International Herald Tribune published a related op-ed by Edwards and Kemp.[37] The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an influential and independent, nonpartisan foreign policy membership organization founded in 1921 and based at 58 East 68th Street (corner Park Avenue) in New York City, with an additional office in Washington, D.C. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been... Jack French Kemp Jr. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ...


On April 6, 2006, Edwards joined Ted Kennedy at a rally for raising the minimum wage.[38] is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named Ted Kennedy, see Ted Kennedy (disambiguation). ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ...


In October 2005, Edwards joined the Wall Street investment firm Fortress Investment Group as a senior adviser, later working with them as a consultant.[39] Unknown to Edwards,[40] Fortress owned a major stake in Green Tree Servicing LLC, which rose to prominence in the 1990s selling subprime loans to mobile-home owners and now services subprime loans originated by others. Subprime loans allow buyers with poor credit histories to be funded, but they charge higher rates because of the risk, and sometimes carry hidden fees and increased charges over time.[40] In August 2007, The Wall Street Journal reported that a portion of the Edwards family's assets were invested in Fortress Investment Group, which had, in turn, invested a portion of its assets in subprime mortgage lenders, some of which had foreclosed on the homes of Hurricane Katrina victims.[41][42] Upon learning of Fortress' investments, Edwards divested funds and stated that he would try to help the affected families.[43] Edwards later helped set up an ACORN- administered "Louisiana Home Rescue Fund" seeded with $100,000, much of it from his pocket, to provide loans and grants to the families who were foreclosed on by Fortress-owned lenders.[44] Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Fortress Investment Group (NYSE: FIG) is a New York, NY-based asset management firm which manages private equity, hedge funds and real estate-related investments. ...


2008 Presidential campaign

John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor Day in 2007
John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor Day in 2007

On December 28, 2006, John Edwards officially announced his candidacy for President in the 2008 election from the yard of a home in New Orleans, Louisiana that was being rebuilt after it was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina.[45][46] Edwards stated that his main goals were eliminating poverty, fighting global warming, providing universal health care, and withdrawing troops from Iraq.[47] John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor day in 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2588 × 1725 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (2588 × 1725 pixel, file size: 2 MB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Universal health care refers to government mandated programs intended to ensure that all citizens, and sometimes permanent residents, of a governmental region have access to most types of health care. ...


National polls had Edwards placing third among the Democratic field beginning in January 2007, behind Senator Hillary Clinton and Senator Barack Obama.[48] As of July 2007, the Edwards campaign raised a total of $23 million from nearly 100,000 donors, placing him behind Obama and Clinton in fundraising.[49] REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... “Barack” redirects here. ...


On January 3, 2008, in the Iowa caucuses, the first contest of the nomination process, Edwards placed second with 29.75 percent of the vote to Obama (37.58 percent), with Clinton coming in third with 29.47 percent of the vote.[50] On January 8, Edwards placed a distant third in the New Hampshire Democratic primary with just less than 17% (48,818 votes). On January 26, Edwards again placed third in the primary in South Carolina, his birth state, which he carried in 2004, and he placed third in the non-binding January 29 vote in Florida. is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard and Pat Nixon campaigning in Nashua, New Hampshire, in 1968 The New Hampshire primary to the U.S. presidential election is the first U.S. presidential primary in the United States. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

In a speech given at the Musicians' Village in New Orleans, Edwards announced his withdrawal from the 2008 United States presidential race.
In a speech given at the Musicians' Village in New Orleans, Edwards announced his withdrawal from the 2008 United States presidential race.

On January 30, 2008, Edwards announced that he was suspending his campaign for the Presidency.[51][52] He did not endorse either Clinton or Obama, but said they both had pledged to carry forward his central campaign theme of ending poverty in America.[53] In April 2008 he stated that he would not accept the 2008 Vice Presidential slot if asked.[54] Musicians Village (New Orleans, Louisiana) is a new neighborhood built around a music center where musicians can teach and perform. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...


Political positions

Edwards promotes programs to eliminate poverty in the United States, is pro-choice, and supports "College for Everyone" initiatives. He has endorsed efforts to slow down global warming. Here are some of Senator John Edwardss votes and remarks on various issues. ...


Although Edwards initially supported the Iraq War, he later re-evaluated his position and in November 2005 wrote an op-ed in The Washington Post in which he said he regretted voting for the Iraq War Resolution, and discussed three solutions for success in the conflict.[55] He has denounced the "troop surge" in Iraq and is a proponent of withdrawal, and has urged Congress to withhold funding for the war without a withdrawal timetable.[56] An Op-Ed is a piece of writing expressing an opinion. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ...


Edwards argues in favor of creating one million housing vouchers over five years in order to place poor people in middle-class neighborhoods. Edwards has stated, "If we truly believe that we are all equal, then we should live together too."[57]


Edwards has a universal health care plan that requires all Americans to purchase health care,[58] "requires that everybody get preventive care,"[59] and requires employers to provide health care or be taxed to fund public health care.[60] He supports a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants,[60] is opposed to a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage,[61] and supports the repeal of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).[62] Universal health care refers to government mandated programs intended to ensure that all citizens, and sometimes permanent residents, of a governmental region have access to most types of health care. ... Illegal immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently, in violation of the law or without documents permitting an immigrant to settle in that country. ... Amend redirects here. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, is the commonly-used name of a federal law of the United States that is officially known as Pub. ...


Electoral history

North Carolina United States Senate election, 1998 (Democratic primary)[63]

  • John Edwards - 277,468 (51.38%)
  • D.G. Martin - 149,049 (27.60%)
  • Ella Butler Scarborough - 55,486 (10.28%)
  • Bob Ayers - 22,477 (4.16%)
  • Mike Robinson - 20,178 (3.74%)
  • James Everette Carmack - 8,200 (1.52%)
  • Gene Gay - 7,173 (1.33%)

North Carolina United States Senate election, 1998[64]

2004 Democratic presidential primaries[65] Categories: Stub | 1928 births | United States Senators ... Categories: Stub | Libertarians ... Ten candidates vied for the nomination, including retired four-star general Wesley Clark, former Vermont Governor Howard Dean, John Edwards, and John Kerry. ...

United States presidential election, 2004 John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Dennis John Kucinich (IPA: ) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general of the United States Army. ... Alfred Charles Al Sharpton Jr. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... Lyndon LaRouche at a news conference in Paris in February 2006. ... Carol Elizabeth Moseley Braun (born August 16, 1947) is an American politician and lawyer who represented Illinois in the United States Senate from 1993 to 1999. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ...

George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... A faithless elector is a member of the United States Electoral College who casts an electoral vote for someone other than the person whom they have pledged to elect. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Peter Miguel Camejo (born December 31, 1939) is an American financier, businessman, politican, and author. ... Badnarik campaigning in July 2004. ... Richard V. Campagna of Iowa City, Iowa was the vice-presidential nominee of the Libertarian Party in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ... Michael Peroutka Michael Anthony Peroutka (born 1952) is a Maryland lawyer, the founder of the Institute on the Constitution, cohost of The American View, and once held a position in the United States Department of Health and Human Services. ... Charles Chuck Baldwin (born May 3, 1952 in La Porte, Indiana) is an American political figure, activist within the Constitution Party, and Baptist minister. ... David Cobb appealing for votes at the annual Fighting Bob Fest in Baraboo, Wisconsin, September 2004 David Keith Cobb (born December 24, 1962 in San Leon, Texas) is an American ex-lawyer and activist, and was the 2004 presidential candidate of the Green Party of the United States (GPUS). ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Bibliography

  • Four Trials (with John Auchard) (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2003) ISBN 0743244974
  • Home: The Blueprints of Our Lives (New York: Collins, 2006) ISBN 0060884541
  • Ending Poverty in America: How to Restore the American Dream, co-editor (New Press, 2007)[66] ISBN 1595581766

Cover of the hardcover edition. ... John Auchard is a professor of English at the University of Mayland, College Park. ...

See also

The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This article lists official and potential Democratic candidates for the President of the United States in the election of 2008. ... This is a collection of scientific, state-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the Democratic presidential primaries, 2008. ... The 2008 Democratic Presidential Debates are political debates prior to the 2008 Democratic Primaries. ...

References

  1. ^ Sheryl Gay Stolberg. "THE 2004 ELECTION; A First-Term Senator's Swift Political Ascent — John Reid Edwards", The New York Times, 2007-07-07. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  2. ^ Patrick Healy. "From Mill Town to the National Stage", The Boston Globe, 2003-10-05. Retrieved on 2007-03-27. 
  3. ^ Evan Thomas, Susannah Meadows and Arian Campo-Flores. "John Edwards: VP Hopeful, Boyish Wonder", Newsweek, 2004-07-19. Retrieved on 2007-09-02. 
  4. ^ AP (2007-03-29). John Edwards Opens Up About Death of Teenage Son. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  5. ^ Wade Edwards Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  6. ^ Katie Couric. "Elizabeth Edwards battles breast cancer", MSNBC, 2004-11-21. Retrieved on 2007-05-20. 
  7. ^ a b Transcript of press conference (2007-03-22). Former Sen. Edwards Holds a News Conference on Wife's Health: Breast Cancer Has Returned. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  8. ^ Candy Crowley. "Edwards: Wife's cancer returns, campaign goes on", CNN, 2007-03-23. Retrieved on 2007-06-14. 
  9. ^ Mary Carter; Elizabeth Cohen and Amy Burkholder. "Edwards: Cancer 'no longer curable'", CNN, 2007-05-22. Retrieved on 2007-06-14. 
  10. ^ Nedra Pickler (2007-03-22). Edwards Presses on With 2008 Campaign. ap.org. Retrieved on 2007-03-22.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g Adam Liptak and Michael Moss. "In Trial Work, Edwards Left a Trademark", The New York Times, 2004-01-31. Retrieved on 2007-05-21. 
  12. ^ a b c John Edwards. FindLaw (n.d.). Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  13. ^ "Defense Rests in Pool Drain Lawsuit", WRAL, 1996-12-17. Retrieved on 2007-05-21. 
  14. ^ Joshua Green. "John Edwards, Esq.", Washington Monthly, 2001-01-10. Retrieved on 2007-03-25. 
  15. ^ Rudin, Ken. "Sen. John Edwards", National Public Radio, 2003-01-30. Retrieved on 2008-04-08. 
  16. ^ Search Results. The Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  17. ^ S.J.RES.46. The Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  18. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes: H.J Res. 114. United States Senate. Retrieved on 2007-12-18.
  19. ^ Jay Newton-Small and Laurence Arnold. "Edwards Says He Still Would Have Voted to Authorize War in Iraq", Bloomberg News, 2004-10-11. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  20. ^ "Meet the Press transcript for October 10, 2004". 
  21. ^ Fragile X Research Breakthrough Act of 1999. Library of Congress (1999-05-26). Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  22. ^ S.3180. The Library of Congress. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  23. ^ a b John Edwards on the Issues. OnTheIssues. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  24. ^ Immigration Voting Report Card for Sen. John Edwards
  25. ^ Hill News, May 7, 2003
  26. ^ http://quote.wikipedia.org/wiki/John Edwards#Two Americas
  27. ^ Jim VandeHei and Dan Balz. "Kerry picks Edwards as running mate: Mass. senator calls ex-rival a man of middle-class values", The Washington Post, 2004-07-06. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  28. ^ "Kerry and Edwards start campaign", BBC News, 2004-07-07. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  29. ^ 2004 South Carolina primary results
  30. ^ CNN
  31. ^ 2004 North Carolina caucuses results
  32. ^ PointofLaw.com | PointOfLaw Forum: Democrats' support for trial lawyers polarizes business community
  33. ^ Kerry's Regrets About John Edwards - TIME
  34. ^ http://oneamericacommittee.com/media/podcasts/20050321/
  35. ^ John Edwards and Jack Kemp Co-Chair Council Task Force on Russian-American Relations - Council on Foreign Relations
  36. ^ Russia's Wrong Direction - Council on Foreign Relations
  37. ^ We need to be tough with Russia - International Herald Tribune
  38. ^ http://www.senatedemocrats.net/node/775
  39. ^ John Edwards Hits the Street
  40. ^ a b Alec MacGillis and John Solomon. "Edwards Says He Didn't Know About Subprime Push", The Washington Post, 2007-05-11. Retrieved on 2007-05-13. 
  41. ^ Free Preview - WSJ.com
  42. ^ John Edwards says he will divest funds linked to lenders foreclosing in New Orleans - International Herald Tribune
  43. ^ "Edwards to end investments with lenders: Says he won't have his money involved with Katrina-related foreclosures", Associated Press, 2007-08-17. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  44. ^ Alec MacGillis. "Edwards to 'Rescue' On Foreclosures", The Washington Post, September 14, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-09-17. 
  45. ^ John Edwards joins race for White House - Times Online
  46. ^ Nedra Pickler. "John Edwards Joins Presidential Race", The Washington Post, 2006-12-28. Retrieved on 2006-12-28. 
  47. ^ "Edwards takes another shot at run for White House", USA Today, 2006-12-29. Retrieved on 2007-07-06. 
  48. ^ Clinton, Obama in Virtual Tie Among Democrats. Rasmussen FReports (2007-01-17). Retrieved on 2007-06-01.
  49. ^ Jim Kuhnhenn. "Edwards Raises More Than $9 Million", Forbes.com, 2007-07-01. Retrieved on 2007-07-06. 
  50. ^ Iowa Democratic Party Caucus Results
  51. ^ "Edwards exits presidential race", CBS News, 2008-01-30. Retrieved on 2008-01-30. 
  52. ^ Holland, Steve (2008-01-30). "Giuliani, Edwards quit White House Race". Reuters. Retrieved on 2008-01-30.
  53. ^ Foon Rhee. "Edwards drops out of race", Boston Globe, 2008-01-30. Retrieved on 2008-01-30. 
  54. ^ Sinead Carew. "John Edwards says would not accept VP nomination", Reuters, 2008-04-03. Retrieved on 2008-04-03. 
  55. ^ John Edwards. "The Right Way in Iraq", 'The Washington Post', 2005-11-13, p. B07. Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  56. ^ "Dems in tough spot with war funding bill", CNN, 2007-05-24. Retrieved on 2007-05-24. 
  57. ^ MacGillis, Alec (May 7), "On Poverty, Edwards Faces Old Hurdles", The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post): A01, Monday, May 7, 2007, <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/05/06/AR2007050601322_pf.html>. Retrieved on 26 January 2008
  58. ^ Universal Health Care Through Shared Responsibility.
  59. ^ Edwards Backs Mandatory Preventive Care.
  60. ^ a b Scott Shepard. "Q&A With John Edwards On Health Care", Cox News Service, 2007-02-07. Retrieved on 2007-12-18. 
  61. ^ "John Edwards on Civil Rights", On the Issues, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-01-03. 
  62. ^ John Edwards on Civil Rights. OnTheIssues.org (2008-01-21). Retrieved on 2008-04-08.
  63. ^ Our Campaigns - NC US Senate - D Primary Race - May 18, 1998
  64. ^ Our Campaigns - NC US Senate Race - Nov 03, 1998
  65. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - D Primaries Race - Jan 13, 2004
  66. ^ "John Edwards pushes focus on poverty in book"

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NPR redirects here. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Reuters Group plc (LSE: RTR and NASDAQ: RTRSY); pronounced is known as a financial market data provider and a news service that provides reports from around the world to newspapers and broadcasters. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Record
Speeches and statements
  • July 27, 2004, Democratic National Convention speech: Transcript text
  • October 5, 2004, Vice Presidential Debate: Transcript text, Audio and Video
  • January 18, 2008, Presidential campaign speech in Los Angeles, California, video
United States Senate
Preceded by
Lauch Faircloth
United States Senator (Class 3) from North Carolina
1999–2005
Served alongside: Jesse Helms, Elizabeth Dole
Succeeded by
Richard Burr
Party political offices
Preceded by
Joe Lieberman
Democratic Party Vice Presidential candidate
2004 (lost)
Succeeded by
N/A: Most recent(1)
Notes and references
1. Most recent presidential election as of 2007
Persondata
NAME Edwards, Johnny Reid
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Edwards, John
SHORT DESCRIPTION American politician
DATE OF BIRTH June 10, 1953
PLACE OF BIRTH Seneca, South Carolina
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ... Project Vote Smart (PVS) is a non-profit, non-partisan research organization that collects and distributes information on candidates for public office in the United States. ... 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United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... Jesse Alexander Helms, Jr. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... See also Democratic Party List of Presidents of the United States List of Vice Presidents of the United States List of Republican Party Presidential nominees List of Whig Party Presidential nominees ... Presidential election results map. ... 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 The following sections collect local-event-based public straw polls, representative of the American voter base, among Democratic, Republican, and other appropriate candidates for the 2008 presidential election. ... Main article: United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the U.S. presidential election, 2008. ... The first intra-party debates between candidates for the 2008 Presidential election. ... This article lists the endorsements made by members of the 110th United States Congress for candidates for their partys nominations in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... Fundraising for United States presidential election of 2008 is a key factor in determining the viability of candidates for the United States presidential election, 2008, along with opinion polling. ... The following is a timeline of events leading up to the upcoming 2008 U.S. presidential election: // October 7 - Maureen Dowd writes article in New York Times entitled Can Hillary Upgrade? which claims that Hillary Clinton, serving as the junior Senator from New York, has mollified her criticism of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Democratic presidential candidates. ... The 2008 Democratic Presidential Debates are political debates prior to the 2008 Democratic Primaries. ... The 2008 Democratic primaries will be the selection process by which the Democrats choose their candidates in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States through a series of primaries and caucuses culminating in the 2008 Democratic National Convention, to be held from Monday, August 25... The 2008 Democratic National Convention will be held from August 25 to August 28 in Denver, Colorado. ... Superdelegate is an informal term for some of the delegates to the Democratic National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Democratic Party. ... // These have filed (or announced plans to file) with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). ... Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947) is the junior United States Senator from New York, and is a candidate for the Democratic nomination in the 2008 presidential election. ... New York Senator and former First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton had expressed interest in the 2008 United States presidential race[1] since at least October 2002, drawing media speculation on whether or not she would become a candidate. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... Barack Obama, the junior United States Senator from Illinois, announced his candidacy for the presidency of the United States in Springfield, Illinois, on February 10, 2007. ... Birch Evans Bayh III (commonly known as Evan Bayh) (pronounced like bye; IPA pronunciation: ) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Biden redirects here. ... United States Democratic Senator Joe Biden of Delaware, announced his candidacy for president of the United States on the January 7, 2007 edition of Meet the Press. ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... Senior Senator Chris Dodd (D-CT) has sought the nomination of the Democratic Party for President of the United States since entering the race early in January 2007. ... John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor day in 2007. ... Dennis John Kucinich (IPA: ) (born October 8, 1946) is an American politician of the Democratic party and a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in both 2004 and 2008. ... Dennis Kucinich announced on December 26, 2006 that he would persue the nomination for the Democratic President of the United States. ... Dal LaMagna is a progressive political activist in Washington state. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... Thomas James Vilsack (born December 13, 1950) is an American politician, a member of the Democratic Party, and served as the 40th Governor of the state of Iowa. ... GOP redirects here. ... Main article: Opinion polling for the United States presidential election, 2008 This is a collection of scientific, nation-wide public opinion polls that have been conducted relating to the 2008 Republican presidential candidates. ... The 2008 Republican Presidential Debates are political debates before the 2008 Republican Primaries. ... The 2008 Republican primaries will be the selection process by which the Republicans elect delegates who will then elect the GOP candidate in the 2008 election for President and Vice President of the United States. ... The 2008 Republican National Convention will take place at the Xcel Energy Center in Saint Paul, Minnesota from September 1 until September 4, 2008. ... This article lists officially declared Republican candidates for the President of the United States in the 2008 election. ... McCain redirects here. ... John McCain, the senior United States Senator from Arizona, announced his formal candidacy for the presidency of the United States and in turn, his intention to seek the nomination of the Republican Party for the 2008 presidential election in Prescott Park on the waterfront of Portsmouth, New Hampshire on Wednesday... Ronald Ernest Ron Paul (b. ... Ron Paul is a 10th-term Congressman, a physician (M.D.), and a 2008 presidential candidate from the state of Texas, seeking the nomination of the Republican Party. ... Samuel Dale Brownback (b. ... Dr. Hugh Cort III is a candidate for U.S. president in the Republican primary and a psychiatrist from Alabama. ... John Cox redirects here. ... Daniel Ayers Gilbert, Dan Gilbert, (b. ... James Stuart Jim Gilmore III (born October 6, 1949) is a Republican politician who was Governor of Virginia from 1998 to 2002. ... Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ... Former Mayor of New York City Rudy Giuliani’s 2008 presidential campaign began in October 2005 when the “Draft Rudy Giuliani for President, Inc” was formed. ... Huckabee redirects here. ... Mike Huckabee, former Governor of Arkansas, officially announced on January 28, 2007 his candidacy for the Republican Party nomination for the 2008 presidential election in the United States. ... Duncan Lee Hunter (born May 31, 1948) is an American politician who has been a Republican member of the House of Representatives since 1981 from Californias 52nd congressional district in northern and eastern San Diego. ... Fourteen-term Congressman and Vietnam War veteran Duncan Hunter of California has announced his intentions to run for the 2008 Republican nomination for President of the United States. ... Raymond L. McKinney (b. ... Willard Mitt Romney (born March 12, 1947) was the 70th Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. ... Mitt Romney is a Republican Party primary candidate to represent his party in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... Thomas Gerard Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party. ... The Tom Tancredo presidential campaign, 2008 for President of the United States began with the announcement of candidacy by the Colorado Congressman on April 2, 2007. ... This article is about the actor/politician. ... Fred Thompson is an unannounced Republican Party primary candidate to represent his party in the 2008 United States presidential election. ... For other people with similar names, see Thomas Thompson. ... The Constitution Party is a conservative United States political party. ... Constitution Party National Convention is held every 2-4 years. ... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... This article is about the American political party, Green Party. ... Cynthia Ann McKinney (born March 17, 1955) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Kent Mesplay is a scientist and political activist from San Diego, California. ... Kat Swift is an American political activist, and co-chair of the Green Party of Texas. ... The Libertarian Party is an American political party founded on December 11, 1971. ... On December 21, 2006, the United States Libertarian Party announced that the 2008 Libertarian National Convention will be held between May 23 and May 26 at the Adam’s Mark Hotel in Denver, Colorado. ... Maurice Robert Mike Gravel (pronounced ) (born May 13, 1930) is a former Democratic United States Senator from Alaska, who served two terms from 1969 to 1981, and is a candidate in the 2008 presidential election. ...   Mike Gravel, a former United States Senator from Alaska, on April 17, 2006 became a declared candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States in the 2008 election,[1] announcing his run in a speech to the National Press Club. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Steven Steve Wynn Kubby (born December 28, 1946) is a Libertarian Party activist who played a key role in the drafting and passage of California Proposition 215. ... George Phillies (born 23 July 1947) is a Libertarian Party activist and professor of physics at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. ... Wayne Root (more commonly known as Wayne Allyn Root) is a business mogul, television celebrity, TV producer, best-selling author, professional sports handicapper, and aspiring politician based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... Mary J. Ruwart (born 16 October 1949) is a libertarian speaker, writer, and activist, the author of the bestselling 1992 book Healing Our World: The Other Piece of the Puzzle. ... Douglas Gene Stanhope (born March 25, 1967) is an American stand-up comedian. ... The Socialist Party USA (SP USA) is one of the heirs to the Socialist Party of America of Eugene V. Debs and Norman Thomas. ... Brian Moore Brian Moore is an independent candidate running on an anti-war campaign for Democratic incumbent Bill Nelsons Senate seat in Floridas 2006 Senate election. ... John Taylor Bowles (born in 1957 in Maryland) is an American neo-nazi and is the NSMs candidate for the United States presidential election, 2008. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney and political activist in the areas of consumer rights, humanitarianism, environmentalism and democratic government. ... Jonathon The Impaler Sharkey (born April 2, 1964 in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is a self proclaimed satanist and vampire (or sanguinary vampyre in his own words) running in the 2006 gubernatorial election in the state of Minnesota. ... Political drafts are used to encourage or compel a certain person to enter a political race, by demonstrating a significant groundswell of support for the candidate. ... A variation of a campaign button being put out by Americans For Rice. ... Elections for the United States House of Representatives will be held on November 4, 2008, with all of the 435 seats in the House being contested. ... Senate Seats up for election:  Two Republican incumbents Republican incumbent Retiring Republican Democratic incumbent No election Elections for the United States Senate will be held on November 4, 2008, with 35 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... Seats up for election. ... Mary Elizabeth Anania Edwards (born July 3, 1949, in Jacksonville, Florida) is an attorney. ... Catharine Elizabeth Cate Edwards (born 4 March 1982) is the oldest daughter of John Edwards, the United States Democratic Partys 2004 nominee for Vice President and Elizabeth Anania Edwards. ... Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former United States Senator from North Carolina. ... Image File history File links John_Edwards,_official_Senate_photo_portrait. ... Cover of the hardcover edition. ... The United States presidential election of 2004 was held on Election Day, Tuesday, November 2, 2004. ... John Edwards campaigning in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on Labor day in 2007. ... Here are some of Senator John Edwardss votes and remarks on various issues. ... United States Senate House of Representatives Congress District 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 1st* (1789-1791) John Baptista Ashe John Steele Hugh Williamson Timothy Bloodworth John Sevier 2nd* (1791-1793) William Barry Grove Nathaniel Macon 3rd* (1793-1795) William J. Dawson Matthew... This article is about Samuel Johnston, North Carolina governor. ... Gov. ... Jesse Franklin (March 24, 1760 -- August 31, 1823) was the Democratic-Republican U.S. senator from the U.S. state of North Carolina between 1799 and 1805 and between 1807 and 1813. ... Gov. ... Gov. ... Categories: Stub | 1795 births | 1870 deaths | United States Senators ... Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ... David Reid 2 Categories: Stub | 1813 births | 1891 deaths | Governors of North Carolina | United States Senators ... Categories: Stub | 1810 births | 1872 deaths | Governors of North Carolina | United States Senators ... Categories: Stub | 1825 births | 1881 deaths | United States Senators ... Categories: Stub | 1826 births | 1904 deaths | United States Senators ... Categories: Stub | 1863 births | 1938 deaths | United States Senators ... Furnifold McLendel Simmons (20 January 1854 - 30 April 1940) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from 1887 to 1889 and U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1901 and 1931. ... Josiah William Bailey (14 September 1873 – 15 December 1946) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1931 and 1946. ... William Bradley Umstead (13 May 1895 -- 7 November 1954) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1953 to 1954. ... Joseph Melville Broughton (born 17 November 1888 Raleigh NC - died 6 March 1949 Bethesda MD) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1941 to 1945. ... Frank Porter Graham (14 October 1886 - 16 February 1972) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina from March 29, 1949, to Nov. ... Willis Smith (19 December 1887 - 26 June 1953) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1950 and 1953. ... Alton Asa Lennon (17 August 1906 - 28 December 1986) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1953 and 1954. ... William Kerr Scott (born 17 April 1896 Haw River, North Carolina - died 16 April 1958 Burlington, North Carolina) was the Democratic Governor of North Carolina from 1949 to 1953. ... Jesse Alexander Helms, Jr. ... Elizabeth Hanford Liddy Dole (born July 29, 1936) is an American politician who served in both the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush presidential administrations, and currently serves as a United States senator from North Carolina. ... Sen. ... Timothy Bloodworth (1736 - August 24, 1814) was an American teacher and statesman from North Carolina. ... For other uses, see David Stone (disambiguation). ... Jesse Franklin (March 24, 1760 -- August 31, 1823) was the Democratic-Republican U.S. senator from the U.S. state of North Carolina between 1799 and 1805 and between 1807 and 1813. ... For other uses, see David Stone (disambiguation). ... Francis Locke (31 October 1776 - 8 January 1823) was a U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ... Nathaniel Macon (December 17, 1758 – June 29, 1837) was a spokesman for the Old Republican faction of the Democratic-Republican Party that wanted to strictly limit the federal government. ... Gov. ... Willie Person Mangum (May 10, 1792–September 7, 1861) was a U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1831 and 1836 and between 1840 and 1853. ... Other uses: Robert Strange (painter), (1721-1792). ... William Alexander Graham (September 5, 1804–August 11, 1875) was a United States Senator from North Carolina from 1840 to 1843 and Governor of North Carolina from 1845 to 1849. ... Categories: Stub | 1801 births | 1852 deaths | United States Senators ... George Edmund Badger (1795 - 1866) was a Whig U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina. ... Categories: Stub | 1811 births | 1878 deaths | United States Senators ... Thomas Lanier Clingman Thomas Lanier Clingman (27 July 1812 – 3 November 1897), known as the Prince of Politicians, was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives from 1843 to 1845 and from 1847 to 1858, and U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1858... Categories: Stub | 1826 births | 1884 deaths | United States Senators ... Augustus Summerfield Merrimon (15 September 1830 - 14 November 1892) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1873 and 1879. ... Zebulon Baird Vance (May 13, 1830--April 14, 1894) was an American Civil War hero and three-time Governor of North Carolina. ... Gov. ... Categories: Stub | 1857 births | 1921 deaths | United States Senators ... Lee Slater Overman Lee Slater Overman ( 3 January 1854 - 12 December 1930) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1903 and 1930. ... Cameron A. Morrison (born 5 October 1869 Richmond County, NC - died 20 August 1953 Québec City Canada) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina from 1921 to 1925. ... Robert Rice Reynolds (18 June 1884 - 13 February 1963) was a Democratic U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina between 1932 and 1945. ... Clyde Roark Hoey (11 December 1877 __ 12 May 1954) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of North Carolina from 1937 to 1941. ... Samuel James Ervin Jr. ... Robert Burren Morgan (born 5 October 1925) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1975 and 1981. ... John Porter East John Porter East (May 5, 1931 – June 29, 1986) was a Republican U.S. senator from the state of North Carolina from 1981 until his suicide in 1986. ... Jim Broyhill James Thomas Broyhill (born 19 August 1927), usually known as Jim Broyhill, is a Republican politician from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... James Terry Sanford (August 20, 1917 – April 18, 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ... Categories: Stub | 1928 births | United States Senators ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... This is a list of the candidates for the offices of President of the United States and Vice President of the United States that the U.S. Democratic Party has nominated since its founding. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. ... Martin Van Buren (December 5, 1782 – July 24, 1862), nicknamed Old Kinderhook, was the eighth President of the United States from 1837 to 1841. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was the ninth Vice President of the United States, serving in the administration of Martin Van Buren. ... For other persons named George Dallas, see George Dallas (disambiguation). ... William Orlando Butler (April 19, 1791 - August 6, 1880) was a U.S. political figure from Kentucky. ... William Rufus DeVane King William Rufus DeVane King (April 7, 1786–April 18, 1853) was a U.S. Representative from North Carolina, a Senator from Alabama, and the thirteenth Vice President of the United States. ... John C. Breckinridge This article is about the politician and Confederate General. ... Herschel Vespasian Johnson (September 18, 1812 - August 16, 1880) was an American politician. ... Joseph Lane (1801-1881) was an American general during the Mexican War. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ... George Pendleton George Hunt Pendleton (July 19, 1825 – November 24, 1889) was a Representative and a Senator from Ohio. ... Francis Preston Blair, Jr. ... Benjamin Gratz Brown (May 28, 1826 - December 13, 1885) was a Liberal Republican Senator, Governor of Missouri, and the Vice presidential candidate in the election of 1872. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... William Hayden English (August 27, 1822–February 7, 1896) was an American politician. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819 – November 25, 1885)[1] was a U.S. Representative and a Senator from Indiana, a Governor of Indiana, and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States (serving with Grover Cleveland). ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Arthur Sewall (November 25, 1835 _ September 5, 1900 was a U.S. Democratic politician from Maine most notable as William Jennings Bryans first running mate in 1896. ... Adlai E. Stevenson I Adlai Ewing Stevenson I (October 23, 1835 – June 14, 1914) was a Representative from Illinois and the twenty-third Vice President of the United States. ... Henry Gassaway Davis (16 November 1823 - March 11, 1916) was a U.S. Democratic politician from West Virginia. ... John Worth Kern (December 20, 1849 - August 17, 1917) was a U.S. Democratic politician from Indiana. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... FDR redirects here. ... Charles Wayland Bryan (February 10, 1867 - March 4, 1945), was the younger brother of perennial U.S. Democratic presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... John Nance Garner IV (November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States (1933-41). ... Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) was the 33rd Vice President of the United States (1941–45), the 11th Secretary of Agriculture (1933–40), and the 10th Secretary of Commerce (1945–46). ... For other persons named Harry Truman, see Harry Truman (disambiguation). ... Alben William Barkley (November 24, 1877 – April 30, 1956) was a Democratic member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the United States Senate from Kentucky, and the thirty-fifth Vice President of the United States. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office John Jackson Sparkman (December 20, 1899 – November 16, 1985) was a United States politician from Alabama. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... LBJ redirects here. ... For other uses, see Hubert Humphrey (disambiguation). ... Edmund Muskie (March 28, 1914 – March 26, 1996) was an American Democratic politician from Maine. ... Thomas Eagleton and George McGovern on July 24, 1972 cover of Time magazine after his nomination for vice president on the Democratic ticket Thomas Eagleton on August 7, 1972 cover of Time Magazine after his withdrawal for vice president on the Democratic ticket. ... Robert Sargent Shriver, Jr. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) is an American politician and member of the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (largely established by former Vice President Hubert Humphrey). ... Geraldine Anne Ferraro (born August 26, 1935) is a Democratic politician and a former member of the United States House of Representatives. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Joseph Isadore Joe Lieberman (born February 24, 1942) is a United States Senator from Connecticut. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seneca, SC welcome sign on Highway 123 Seneca is a city in Oconee County, South Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83...

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† Live Prayer For John Edwards, Pray For John Edwards (327 words)
Welcome to Pray For John Edwards, where your prayers for this great man come to life and are then sent to the people of our great nations and beyond.
These are real prayers, prayers for the family of John Edwards and blessings by people who visit this site and it can be a gift for those who place and read the prayers alike.
John Edwards has been chosen, a chosen leader.
John Edwards Speaks At Dartmouth, - CBS News (803 words)
Edwards, a former senator from North Carolina who ran on the Democratic ticket in 2004, was met with a standing ovation as he began his speech with an attack on the current administration.
Edwards also concentrated on two of the specific policies that he felt differentiated him from the other Democratic candidates ­;-- his policies concerning Iraq and Iran.
Edwards also touched briefly on tax reform, suggesting he would remove tax cuts for the rich, investing the taxes instead to create a universal health care system.
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