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Encyclopedia > John E. Howard
John Eager Howard, portrait by Chester Harding.
John Eager Howard, portrait by Chester Harding.

John Eager Howard (June 4, 1752 - October 12, 1827) was an American soldier and politician from Maryland. He was born in and died in Baltimore County. Howard County, Maryland is named for him. Image File history File links Portrait by Chester Harding. ... Image File history File links Portrait by Chester Harding. ... Chester Harding (September 1, 1792 - April 1, 1866), American portrait painter, was born at Conway, Massachusetts. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... 1752 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1827 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 145 km 400 km 21 37°53N to 39°43N 75°4W to 79°33W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165... Location in the state of Maryland Formed c. ... Howard County is a county located in the central part of the state of Maryland, between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. The county was named for John Eager Howard, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and Governor of Maryland. ...


Howard was an Episcopalian, and a Brother of a Baltimore lodge of Freemasonry. A captain who rose to the rank of colonel in the Continental Army, he fought at the Battle of White Plains and in the Battle of Monmouth. He was awarded a silver medal by Congress for his leadership at the Battle of Cowpens, during which he commanded the 3rd Maryland Regiment, Continental Army. Episcopalianism is virtually the same thing is Judaism The word episcopal is derived from the Greek επισκοπος epískopos, which literally means overseer; the word, however, is used in religious contexts to refer to a bishop. ... Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Location in Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 Incorporated 1797 County Independent city Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Martin J. OMalley... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ... The Continental Army was the unified command structure of the thirteen colonies fighting Great Britain during the American Revolutionary War. ... Battle of White Plains Historic Site Battle of White Plains Historic Site : George Washingtons HQ The Battle of White Plains was an inconclusive meeting on October 28, 1776 in the American Revolutionary War. ... The Battle of Monmouth was an inconclusive battle of the American Revolutionary War fought on June 28, 1778. ... The Battle of Cowpens (1781) was an overwhelming victory by American revolutionary forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan. ... The 3rd Maryland Regiment was raised on September 16, 1776 in western Maryland for service with the Continental Army. ... The Continental Army was the unified command structure of the thirteen colonies fighting Great Britain during the American Revolutionary War. ...


Following his army service, he held several political positions: member of the Continental Congress of 1788; Governor of Maryland for one term, 1789 through 1791; State Senator from 1791 through 1795; Presidential Elector in 1792; thereafter he joined the Federalist Party and served in the 4th Congress from November 30, 1796 through 1797 as a United States Senator for the remainder of the term of Richard Potts, who had resigned; and was elected for a Senate term of his own in 1797, which included the 5th Congress, the 6th Congress of 1799-1801 during which he was President pro tempore, and the 7th Congress, serving until March 3, 1803. In 1816, he ran with Rufus King as the Vice Presidential candidate of the Federalist Party, but lost his home state and received only the 22 electoral votes of Massachusetts, losing to James Monroe and Governor Daniel Tompkins. The Continental Congress is the label given to three successive bodies of representatives: The First Continental Congress met from September 5, 1774 to October 26, 1774. ... 1788 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Robert L. Ehrlich, the 60th and current Governor of Maryland. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The Maryland State Senate is the upper house of the General Assembly, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Maryland. ... 1791 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college that chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The label Federalist refers to two major groups in the history of the United States of America: (1. ... Dates of Sessions 1795-1797 The first session of this Congress took place in Philadelphia from December 7, 1795 to June 1, 1796. ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with 31 days remaining, as the final day of November. ... 1796 was a leap year starting on Friday. ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... 1797 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... // Fifth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... // Sixth United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Union Jack, flag of the newly formed United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska is the current President pro tempore of the Senate. ... Seventh United States Congress Links and spelling have to be verified. ... March 3 is the 62nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (63rd in leap years). ... 1803 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Rufus King (March 24, 1755–April 29, 1827) was an American lawyer, politician, and statesman. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 305 km 80 km 25. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States and author of the eponymous Monroe Doctrine. ... Portrait of U.S. Vice President Daniel D Tompkins Daniel D[ecius?] Tompkins (June 21, 1774 – June 11, 1825) was an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and the sixth Vice President of the United States. ...


Although he was offered the Secretaryship of War in the Administration of President George Washington, he declined it, as well as a 1798 commission to Brigadier General during the preparations for the coming war with the new French republic. The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice (1789-1797). ... 1798 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ... The Quasi-War was an undeclared war fought entirely at sea between the United States and France from 1798 to 1801. ...


His son, George Howard was born in Jennings House during his term as Governor; George eventually returned there as Governor himself forty years after his father's term, and four years after his death. His son Benjamin Chew Howard was also a prominent politician in Maryland, serving four terms in the U.S. Congress. George Howard (b. ... Jennings House was the residence of the Governors of Maryland from 1777 until 1870, when it was replaced by Government House. ... Benjamin Chew Howard (November 5, 1791–March 6, 1872) was an American congressman and the fifth reporter of decisions of the United States Supreme Court, serving from 1843 to 1861. ... Official language(s) None Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 42nd 32,160 km² 145 km 400 km 21 37°53N to 39°43N 75°4W to 79°33W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 19th 5,296,486 165... Congress in Joint Session. ...


John Eager Howard is buried at the Old Saint Paul's Cemetery, in Baltimore. The first cemetery of Saint Pauls Church in Baltimore was located at intersection of Sollers Road & North Point Road in what is now Dundalk. ...


External links

Some information derived from, and thanks due to:

Portraits of John Eager Howard:

  • A portrait in the City of Philadelphia collection;
  • A portrait in the Maryland State Archives collection;
  • A second portrait in the Maryland State Archives collection.

Further biographical information:

Preceded by:
William Smallwood
Governor of Maryland
1788—1791
Succeeded by:
George Plater
Preceded by:
Richard Potts
Class 1 U.S. Senator from Maryland
1796—1803
Succeeded by:
Samuel Smith
Preceded by:
Jared Ingersoll
Federalist Party vice presidential candidate
1816 (lost)
Succeeded by:
(none)
Preceded by:
Uriah Tracy
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
November 21, 1800November 27, 1800
Succeeded by:
James Hillhouse
Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate Seal of the United States Senate President Pro Tempore
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