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Encyclopedia > John Dillon

John Dillon (September 4, 1851 - August 4, 1927) was an Irish nationalist politician. The son of John Blake Dillon (1816-1866), a former "Young Irelander", he was educated at Trinity College, Dublin and at the Catholic University in Louvain, Belgium, and afterwards studied medicine. Dillon entered parliament in 1880 as a member for County Tipperary, and was at first an ardent supporter of Charles Stewart Parnell. He was arrested in May 1881 under the Coercion Act, and again in October, after two months of freedom. September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... 1852 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... // Nationalism is an ideology which holds that the nation, ethnicity or national identity is a fundamental unit of human social life, and makes certain political claims based on that belief, above all the claim that the nation is the only legitimate basis for the state, and that each nation is... John Blake Dillon (1816 - September 15, 1866) was an Irish writer and Politician who was one of the founding members of the Young Ireland movement. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... Medicine on the Web NLM (National Library of Medicine, contains resources for patients and healthcare professionals) Virtual Hospital (digital health sciences library by the University of Iowa) Online Medical Dictionary Collection of links to free medical resources Categories: Medicine | Health ... The debating chamber or hemicycle of the European Parliament in Brussels. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Charles Stewart Parnell (June 27, 1846 – October 6, 1891) was an Irish political leader and one of the most important figures in 19th century Ireland and the United Kingdom; William Ewart Gladstone thought him the most remarkable person he had ever met. ... 1881 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1883 he resigned his seat for reasons of health, but was returned unopposed in 1885 for East Mayo, which he continued to represent until 1918. He was one of the prime movers in the Irish Land League's famous plan of campaign, which provided that the tenant should pay his rent to the National League instead of the landlord, and in case of eviction be supported by the general fund. Dillon was compelled by the Court of Queens Bench on December 14, 1886 to find securities for good behaviour, but two days later he was arrested while receiving rents on Lord Clanricarde's estates. In this instance the jury disagreed, but in June 1888 under the provisions of the new Criminal Law Procedure Bill he was condemned to six months imprisonment. He was, however, released in September, and in the spring of 1889 sailed for Australia and New Zealand, where he collected funds for the Nationalist party. On his return to Ireland he was again arrested, but, being allowed bail, sailed to America, and failed to appear at the trial. He returned to Ireland by way of Boulogne, where he and William O'Brien held long and indecisive conferences with Parnell. They surrendered to the police in February, and were released from Galway gaol in July. 1883 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1885 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Irish painter Henry Jones Thaddeus enlisted the conscience of the propertied classes with the sentimental realism of La retour du bracconier (The Wounded Poacher), exhibited in the Paris Salon of 1881, at the height of the Irish Land War Irish land League poster dating from the 1880s The Irish... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 9 - The United States of America is 40,000 days old. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1889 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... William OBrien (2 October 1852_25 February 1928) was an Irish journalist, writer and politician, particularly associated with campaigns for land reform in Ireland during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. ...


After the divorce case in which the leader of the Irish Nationalist Party, Parnell, was named, most of the party turned against him, Dillon being one of his strongest opponents. Parnell refused to step down and the party split, with Justin McCarthy becoming leader of the majority. John Redmond led the minority grouping after the death of Parnell later in 1891. Dillon took over the leadership of the Anti-Parnellites in 1892. The two parties reunited in 1900 with John Redmond as leader and Dillon as deputy leader. The Nationalist Party existed under various froms from 1874 to 1973. ... Justin MCarthy (22 November 1830 - 1912) was an Irish politician, historian and novelist. ... John Redmond, MP John Edward Redmond (1856 – March 1918) was the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party from 1900 to 1918. ... 1892 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... John Redmond, MP John Edward Redmond (1856 – March 1918) was the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party from 1900 to 1918. ...


In the autumn of 1896 he arranged a convention of the Irish race, which included 2,000 delegates from various parts of the world. In 1897 Dillon opposed in the House the Address to Queen Victoria on the occasion of the Diamond Jubilee, on the ground that her reign had not been a blessing to Ireland, and he showed the same uncompromising attitude in 1901 when a grant to Lord Roberts was under discussion, accusing him of systematized inhumanity. He was suspended on the March 20 for violent language addressed to Mr Chamberlain. 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1901 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (80th in Leap years). ...


In his approach to Irish self-government under Home Rule he took a more uncompromising stand to Redmond's, who during the Ulster crisis of 1913 was prepared to concede a large measure of local autonomy to Ulster, which was unthinkable for Dillon, who putting the integrity of Ireland foremost, poured scorn on Edward Carson's threat of civil war as being a gigantic bluff. He only agreed with utter reluctance to Redmond conceding to six counties temporarily opting out of the Home Rule Act 1914, then suspended until the end of the Great War. Devolution or Home rule is the pooling of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... Ulster (Irish: Cúige Uladh, IPA: ) is one of the four provinces of Ireland. ... Edward Carson HMSO image Edward Henry Carson, 1st Baron Carson (February 9, 1854 – October 22, 1935) was a leader of the Irish Unionists, a Barrister and a Judge. ... The Government of Ireland Act 1914, more generally known as the Third Home Rule Act (or Bill) or the (Irish) Home Rule Act 1914, was an Act of Parliament passed by the British House of Commons in May 1914 which sought to give Ireland internal self_government within the United Kingdom... Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ...


After the 1916 revolt he personally intervened with Lloyd George to prevent the executions which he insisted would "fill the whole country" with the same type of radicals as opposed to imprisonment, which he said would leave the radicals with as many supporters as could "fit in a [single gaol] cell", but the British could only contemplate the loss of so many (about 120) good soldiers, many Irish Catholics themselves, that only execution would suffice. Attacking the Government in the House of Commons and declaring that the rebels were "wrong", but had fought "a clean fight" (both of which assertions could be challenged) it was apparent how unbridgeble the chasm in Anglo-Irish relations had became. After Redmond's death in March 1918 he followed him as leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, opposing with tooth and nail the threat of conscription a month later. He made clear in September that the goal of Home Rule was "the establishment of national self-government, including full and complete executive, legislative and fiscal power", and that national solidarity was essential. Easter Rising - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd George of Dwyfor, OM (January 17, 1863–March 26, 1945) was a British statesman and the last Liberal to be Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... In some bicameral parliaments of a Westminster System, the House of Commons has historically been the name of the elected lower house. ... In 1882 Charles Stewart Parnell, the leader of the Nationalist Party, formed the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP), replacing the Home Rule League, as a parliamentary party with strict rules. ...


It was left to Dillon to fight a last gallant but unsuccessful campaign in the general election of 1918 which swept his party, but certainly not its tradition, into oblivion. The Irish general election of 1918 was that part of the 1918 United Kingdom general election that took place in Ireland. ...


He married in 1895 to Elizabeth (d. 1907), daughter of Lord Justice J. C. Mathew, and died at the age of 76 after witnessing the atrocities of the Anglo-Irish War and the Irish Civil War. His son was James Dillon, leader of the Centre Party and of Fine Gael, who raised hackles and even death threats in the Irish Free State when he, quixotically, suggested that the Irish Free State actively support the Allies in World War 2. An Irish War of Independence memorial in Dublin The Anglo-Irish War (also known as the Irish War of Independence) was a guerilla campaign mounted against the British government in Ireland by the Irish Republican Army under the proclaimed legitimacy of the First Dáil, the extra-legal Irish parliament... The Irish Civil War (June 1922–April 1923) was a conflict between supporters and opponents of the Anglo-Irish Treaty of December 6, 1921, which established the Irish Free State, precursor of todays Republic of Ireland. ... James Dillon (26 September 1902 - 10 February 1986) was an Irish politician and leader of Fine Gael from 1959 to 1965. ... The Centre Party was a political party in the Irish Free State in the early 1930s. ... Fine Gael (IPA in English and in Irish, approximate English translation: Family of the Irish) is the second largest political party in both the Republic of Ireland and Ireland as a whole. ... The Irish Free State (Irish: Saorstát Éireann) was (1922–1937) the name of the state comprising the 26 of Irelands 32 counties which were separated from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland under the Irish Free State Agreement (or Anglo-Irish Treaty) signed by British and...


This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclop√¶dia Britannica, which is in the public domain. Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents, in many ways, the sum of knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
JOHN DILLON - LoveToKnow Article on JOHN DILLON (435 words)
John Dillon was educated at the Roman Catholic university of Dublin, and afterwards studied medicine.
He was one of the prime movers in the famous plan of campaign, which provided that the tenant should pay his rent to the National League instead of the landlord, and in case of eviction be supported by the general fund.
Mr Dillon was compelled by the court of queens bench on the 14th of December 1886 to find securities for good behaviour, but two days later he was arrested while receiving rents on Lord Clanricardes estates.
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