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Encyclopedia > John Deere
John Deere

John Deere (February 7, 1804May 17, 1886) was an American blacksmith and manufacturer who founded Deere & Company— the largest agricultural and construction equipment manufacturers in the world. This is an image of John Deere, the founder of Deere & Company. ... John Deere Logo A John Deere 7800 tractor attached to a corn planter. ... Deere & Company (usually known by its brand name John Deere) (NYSE: DE) is an American corporation based in Moline, Illinois, and the leading manufacturer of agricultural machinery in the world. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1804 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Blacksmith (disambiguation). ... Deere & Company (usually known by its brand name John Deere) (NYSE: DE) is an American corporation based in Moline, Illinois, and the leading manufacturer of agricultural machinery in the world. ...

Contents

Early life

Deere was born in Rutland, Vermont, the son of William Rinold Deere, a tailor. His father disappeared en route to England in 1808, where he was seeking a possible inheritance. John received a basic education from the local common school and briefly attended Middlebury College, before dropping out. With no inheritance and a meager education, he was apprenticed in 1821, at age 17, by his mother. He served four years as apprentice to Captain Benjamin Lawrence, a prosperous Middlebury blacksmith, and entered the trade for himself in 1825.[1][2] Rutland, Vermont Rutland is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, United States. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A common school was a public school in United States in the nineteenth century. ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ...


In 1827 he married Demarius Lamb, and by 1836 the couple had four children, with a fifth child on the way. The business was not doing very well and Deere was having trouble with his creditors. Facing bankruptcy, Deere sold the shop to his father-in-law, and departed for Illinois. He left his wife and family, who were to join him later.


Steel plow

Deere settled in Grand Detour, Illinois. As there were no other blacksmiths in the area, Deere had no difficulty finding work. Growing up in his father’s Rutland, Vermont tailor shop, Deere had polished and sharpened needles by running them through sand. This polishing helped the needles sew through tough leather.[3] He found that cast-iron plows were not working very well in the tough prairie soil found in Illinois, and remembering the polished needles.[3] Deere came to the conclusion that a plow made out of highly polished steel and a correctly shaped moldboard (the self-scouring steel plow) would better be able to handle the soil conditions of the prairie, especially its sticky clay. [4] There are varying versions of the inspiration for Deere to create the invention he is famed for, the steel plow. In another version he recalled the way the polished steel pitchfork tines moved through hay and soil and thought that the same effect could be obtained for a plow.[5] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... For other uses, see Prairie (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... A pitchfork next to a compost bin Pitching hay A pitchfork is a tool with a long handle and long, thin, widely separated pointed tines (also called prongs) used to lift and throw loose material, such as hay, leaves, grapes, or other agricultural products. ...


In 1837 Deere developed and manufactured the first commercially-successful cast-steel plow. The wrought iron plow had a steel share which made it ideal for the tough soil of the Midwest, and worked better than other plows.[5] By early 1838 Deere completed his first steel plow and sold it to a local farmer, Lewis Crandall, who quickly spread word of his success with Deere's plow, and so two neighbors soon placed orders with Deere. Confident that he had some stability, Deere moved his family to Grand Detour later that year. By 1841 he was manufacturing 75 plows per year and 100 plows per year the next.[5] John Deere the steel plow was awsome it was invented by John Deere and it was a major invention b/c the plow before would get stuck in the tough sod, so when he came out with the plow it just slid right through the dirt. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... John Deere the steel plow was awsome it was invented by John Deere and it was a major invention b/c the plow before would get stuck in the tough sod, so when he came out with the plow it just slid right through the dirt. ...


In 1843 Deere partnered with Leonard Andrus to produce more plows to keep up with demand. However, the partnership became strained due to 1) the two men's stubbornness--while Deere wished to sell to customers outside Grand Detour, Andrus opposed a proposed railroad through Grand Detour; and 2) Deere began to question Andrus's accounting practices. [6] In 1848, Deere dissolved the partnership with Andrus, and moved to Moline, Illinois because the city's location by the Mississippi River, and because it was a transportation hub. By 1855, over 10,000 such plows were sold by Deere's factory. From the very beginning, Deere insisted on making high quality equipment. Deere once said, "I will never put my name on a product that does not have in it the best that is in me." As the business improved, Deere left the day to day operations to his son Charles. In 1868, Deere incorporated his business as Deere & Company. Moline is a city in Rock Island County, Illinois, United States. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Deere & Company (usually known by its brand name John Deere) (NYSE: DE) is an American corporation based in Moline, Illinois, and the leading manufacturer of agricultural machinery in the world. ...


Late life

Later in life, Deere focused most of his attention on civil and political affairs. He served as President of the National Bank of Moline, a director of the Moline Free Public Library, and was a trustee of the First Congregational Church.[2][7] Deere also served as Moline's second mayor for a two year term, where despite his disastrous handling of liquor licensing, Deere improved the city's infrastructure by having streetlights, sewage and water piping (including fire hydrants) installed and sidewalks repaired, and bought eighty-three acres for $15,000 for the creation of a city park. Due to chest pains and dysentery Deere refused to run for a second term. [8] [2] Deere died at home on May 17, 1886. The company he founded continued following his death, and has become the world's second leading provider of advanced products and services for agriculture and forestry and a major provider of advanced products and services for construction, lawn and turf care, landscaping and irrigation.[citation needed] Moline is a city in Rock Island County, Illinois, United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


References

  1. ^ "The Women in John Deere's Life: Sarah Yates Deere 1780-1826," Deere & Company, official website. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  2. ^ a b c "John Deere: A Biography," Deere & Company, official website. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  3. ^ a b "170 Years of John Deere," The Toy Tractor Times, January 2007. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  4. ^ Attoun, Marti. "American Innovator, Agricultural Icon," AmericanProfile.com, 17 April 2005. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  5. ^ a b c Leffingwell, Randy. "John Deere: A History of the Tractor," (Google Books), MotorBooks/MBI Publishing Company, 2004, pg. 10, (ISBN 0760318611). Retrieved 21 May 2007.
  6. ^ Dahlstrom, Neil and Dahlstrom, Jeremy.The John Deere Story: A Biography of Plowmakers John & Charles Deere. Northern Illinois University Press, 2005, pg. 18
  7. ^ "John Deere: Founder and President 1837-1886," Deere & Company, official website. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  8. ^ Dahlstrom, Neil and Dahlstrom, Jeremy.The John Deere Story: A Biography of Plowmakers John & Charles Deere. Northern Illinois University Press, 2005, pgs. 101-104

  Results from FactBites:
 
2007 John Deere Classic (1059 words)
The John Deere Classic apologizes for the late change, and the loss of an Iowa alternative, but knows that the Park and Ride system will continue to deliver a great experience for all patrons with its air-conditioned, handicapped accessible buses.
The John Deere Classic board of directors today congratulated fellow board member Zach Johnson on his victory Sunday in The ATandT Classic at the TPC Sugarloaf outside Atlanta.
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John Deere - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (537 words)
Deere was born in Rutland, Vermont, the son of William Deere.
Deere eventually came to the conclusion that a plow made out of highly polished steel and a correctly shaped moldboard (the self-scouring steel plow) would better be able to handle the soil conditions of the prairie, especially its sticky clay.
In 1848, Deere dissolved the partnership with Andrus, and moved to Moline, Illinois because the city's location by the Mississippi River, and because it was a transportation hub.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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