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Encyclopedia > John Charles Ryle

John Charles Ryle (May 10, 1816 - June 10, 1900) was the first bishop of Liverpool (Anglican / Church of England). May 10 is the 130th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (131st in leap years). ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... 1900 is a common year starting on Monday. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Liverpool is a city and metropolitan borough on Merseyside in north west England, on the north side of the Mersey estuary. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


Ryle was born at Macclesfield, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he was Craven Scholar in 1836. Location within the British Isles Macclesfield is a market town in Cheshire, England with a population of around 69,000. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (that is, an independent, fee-charging secondary school) for boys. ... Christ Church, called in Latin Ædes Christi (i. ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


After holding a curacy at Exbury in Hampshire, he became rector of St Thomas's, Winchester (1843), rector of Helmingham, Suffolk (1844), vicar of Stradbroke (1861), honorary canon of Norwich (1872), and dean of Salisbury (1880). However before taking the latter office, he was advanced to the new see of Liverpool, where he remained until his resignation, which took place three months before his death at Lowestoft. From the Latin curatus (compare Curator), a curate is a person who is invested with the care, or cure (cura), of souls of a parish. ... Hampshire (abbr. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings. ... Location within the British Isles Winchester Cathedral as seen from Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, with a population of around 35,000. ... 1843 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Suffolk (pronounced suffuk) is a large traditional and administrative county in the East Anglia region of eastern England. ... 1844 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the broadest sense, a vicar (from the Latin vicarius) is anyone acting as a substitute or agent for a superior (compare vicarious). In this sense, the title is comparable to lieutenant. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A canon (from the Latin canonicus and Greek κανωνικωσ relating to a rule) is a priest who is a member of certain bodies of the Christian clergy subject to a rule (canon). ... Norwich (pronounced variously Norritch or Norridge) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England, and the regional administrative centre and county town of Norfolk. ... 1872 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In religious terminology, a dean is a title accorded to persons holding cartain positions of authority within a religious heirarchy. ... Salisbury Cathedral from the Cathedral Yard High Street Market Great West Front of Salisbury Cathedral Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a small cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... See: Signing Exact English Visual perception Episcopal see Holy See This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Map sources for Lowestoft at grid reference TM5492 Sunrise at Ness Point, Lowestoft. ...


Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school. Among his longer works are Christian Leaders of the Eighteenth Century (1869), Expository Thoughts on the Gospels (7 vols, 1856-69), Principles for Churchmen (1884). The word evangelicalism usually refers to a conservative tendency in diverse branches of Protestantism, typified by an emphasis on evangelism, a personal experience of conversion, biblical inerrancy, biblically-oriented faith, and a belief in the relevance of Christian faith to cultural issues. ...


His second son, Herbert Edward Ryle was also a bishop. Herbert Edward Ryle (1856 - 1925), was a distinguished Old Testament scholar. ...


External links

  • The Teaching of the Ritualists not the Teaching of the Church of England (pdf), Church Association Tract 4

This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, which is in the public domain. PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The Church Association was an English evangelical Christian organisation, founded in 1865. ... Supporters contend that the Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1911) represents the sum of human knowledge at the beginning of the 20th century; indeed, it was advertised as such. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
RyleBiog (13116 words)
Finally, Ryle was thoroughly committed to the National Church of England and he did not shirk the responsibility of sitting alongside men of different persuasions in the debating forums of the Church, the Church Congresses and Diocesan Conferences.
Ryle’s outstanding memory of Cork was falling asleep in the cathedral during the sermon.
Ryle went to stay with family friends in London; the rest of the family were scattered; Ryle and his sister Mary Ann stayed on for six weeks to help their father wind up affairs.
John Charles Ryle at AllExperts (301 words)
John Charles Ryle (May 10, 1816 - June 10, 1900) was the first bishop of Liverpool (Anglican / Church of England).
Ryle was born at Macclesfield, and was educated at Eton and at Christ Church, Oxford, where he was Craven Scholar in 1836.
Ryle was a strong supporter of the evangelical school and a critic of Ritualism.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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