FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > John Carroll University

John Carroll University

Seal of John Carroll University Image File history File links Jcu_seal_small. ...

Motto Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam
Established 1886
Type Private-Roman Catholic (Jesuit)
Endowment $170,000,000.00
President Rev. Robert L. Niehoff, S.J.
Faculty 240
Undergraduates 3200
Postgraduates 850
Location University Heights, Ohio, United States
Address 20700 North Park Blvd.
University Heights, OH 44118
Campus Suburban, 62 acres
Colors Blue and Gold            
Mascot Blue Streaks
Athletics NCAA Division III Ohio Athletic Conference
Affiliations Society of Jesus
Website www.jcu.edu

John Carroll University is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area in the United States. The university was founded as Saint Ignatius College by the Society of Jesus. A member of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, John Carroll was founded in 1886. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (Latin: For the greater glory of God), often abbreviated AMDG, is the motto of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Rev. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... University Heights is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... University Heights is a city located in Cuyahoga County, Ohio. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Ohio Athletic Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Ohio. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Nickname: Motto: Progress & Prosperity Location in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Cuyahoga Founded 1796 Incorporated 1814 (village)   1836 (city) Government  - Mayor Frank G. Jackson (D) Area [1]  - City  82. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Saint Ignatius High School is a private Roman Catholic Jesuit high school for men located in Cleveland, Ohio, USA. Founded in 1886 by a group of German Jesuits from Buffalo, New York on the invitation of Bishop Richard Gilmore, the school was originally a six-year secondary school based on... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The university is organized into three schools including two undergraduate colleges: the College of Arts and Sciences and the Boler School of Business, and one graduate school, each defining its own academic programs under the auspices of the Academic Vice President.[1] Since the mid 20th century, the university has been expanding both its campus resources and influence worldwide. Several new academic and residence buildings have been constructed and the university has expanded its international programs.

Contents

History

John Carroll University was founded in 1886 under the title of St. Ignatius College as a "college for men." It has been in continuous operation as a degree-granting institution since that time. Founded as the 19th of 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the United States, it was founded 97 years after Georgetown University.[2] Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ...


The Jesuits who founded St. Ignatius College were exiles from Germany, forced out by Bismarck's Kulturkampf. They brought with them the traditional structure of the Jesuit college as an extension of the apostolate of the religious community to prepare the student morally as well as intellectually. The principal instrument of this education was the classical course of seven years, in which the first three years were devoted to learning languages as necessary tools. The student was then considered prepared for university work. The next four years were devoted to the study of classical literature and Latin and Greek prose and poetry, and to developing the ability to express one's self in these languages, as well as in the vernacular, orally and in writing. The final year was devoted to philosophy. There were also electives in the sciences, history, and geography, as well as other subjects. If the student completed only six years, a certificate was given. Completion of the year of philosophy made the student eligible for the baccalaureate degree, which the college was empowered to grant when it was chartered in 1890 (State of Ohio 1890). The first two degrees were awarded in 1895.[3] The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... “Bismarck” redirects here. ... The German term Kulturkampf (literally, culture struggle) refers to German policies in relation to secularity and the influence of the Roman Catholic Church, enacted from 1871 to 1878 by the Chancellor of the German Empire, Otto von Bismarck. ...


In 1923, the College was renamed John Carroll University, after the first archbishop of the Catholic Church in the United States and founder of fellow Jesuit institution Georgetown University. In 1935, it was moved from its original location on the west side in the Ohio City neighborhood of Cleveland to its present site in University Heights, a suburb 10 miles east of downtown Cleveland. The city had been renamed from Idlewood during the construction of the campus.[4] Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Carroll (January 8, 1735 – December 3, 1815) was a priest of the Catholic Society of Jesus. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... Georgetown University is an elite private research university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C., United States. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... University Heights is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ...


In September 1968, the University made the transition from full-time male enrollment to a fully coeducational institution, admitting women to the College of Arts and Sciences for the first time. Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ...


In recent years, the University has undergone extensive reconstruction and expansion. In 2003, the University opened the $66 million, 265,000 ft² (25,000 m²) Dolan Center for Science and Technology, named after alumnus Charles Dolan, founder of Cablevision. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Francis Chuck Dolan (born on October 16, 1926 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American business executive. ... For other uses, see Cablevision (disambiguation). ...


In October of 2005, the Rev. Robert Niehoff was inaugurated the 24th president of John Carroll University.


Organization

John Carroll University consists of three schools: The College of Arts and Sciences, the Boler School of Business, and the Graduate School. The Boler School of Business offers both undergraduate and graduate degrees in business administration.


Campus

More than twenty major buildings, predominantly Gothic in architecture, and sixty landscaped acres make up the Carroll campus. Thorne Acres, a 38-acre property in nearby Chardon, provides additional recreational and educational facilities. Interior of Cologne Cathedral Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ...


Major buildings include the Grasselli Library and its John G. and Mary Jane Breen Learning Center, the James A. Bohannon Science Center, the Thomas P. O'Malley, SJ Center for Communications and Language Arts, and the D.J. Lombardo Student Center. This center includes the Little Theatre, the Harold C. Schott Dining Hall, the Inn Between, the Underground, recreational facilities, public conference rooms, and offices for student organizations; it is also the location of the Fritzsche Religious Center containing the campus ministry offices and the Saint Francis Chapel. In recent years, the University has purchased several homes as well as a nearby shopping plaza which abut the campus in order to both provide for additional office and housing space, but also to help preserve the look of the neighborhood around the campus which has become landlocked since the University was one of the original developments in what was once part of neighboring Shaker Heights.


The Don Shula Sports Center includes the William H. Johnson Natatorium and the Ralph Vince Fitness Center. Other major facilities include: Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ...

  • Administration Building
  • Boler School of Business
  • Dolan Center for Science and Technology
  • Kulas Auditorium
  • Rodman Hall
  • Wasmer and Schweickert fields for outdoor athletic events.
  • Eight student residence halls.

Academics

Core Curriculum

The College of Arts and Sciences requires a rigorous liberal arts core for all undergraduate students. Among the requirements are a first year seminar course, two semesters of a foreign language, three philosophy courses, and two religious studies courses. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... Religious studies is the designation commonly used in the English-speaking world for a multi-disciplinary, secular study of religion that dates to the late 19th century in Europe (and the influential early work of such scholars as Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the...


The Core Curriculum in the Liberal Arts of John Carroll is informed by the principles that issue from the University's mission as a Catholic and Jesuit liberal arts institution of higher learning. Accordingly, the Core emphasizes the development of whole human persons who are educated in the humanizing arts and sciences; skilled in expression and in scholarly investigation; and aware of the interrelationship of all knowledge and the interdependence of all peoples. Moreover, it promotes the integration of faith and culture by imparting a deeper knowledge of and respect for the students' own cultural and religious traditions as well as those of others. Finally, it highlights intellectual, moral and spiritual principles, and the responsible social actions which flow from them. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ...


As a means to achieve these and other goals significant to the University's mission, the Core has a distributive structure as well as distinctive emphases. The Core thus allows selectivity while also stipulating certain academic experiences which are important for all students.


The distributive requirements are designed to combine with the specific requirements to provide an equilibrium among disciplines as well as to create a coherence that will enable students to integrate their core experience successfully.


International programs

John Carroll has several international programs in which eligible upperclassman are able to participate. The university operates several of their own programs and cooperates with other Jesuit universities in operating other programs. John Carroll University's Exchange Programs include the International Student Exchange Program, and programs at Kansai Gaidai University, Nanzan University and Sophia University, all in Japan as well as the University of Dortmund, Germany and University of Hull, England.[5] Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ... Main Entrance, Nakamiya campus Kansai Gaidai University (関西外国語大学 Kansai Gaikokugo Daigaku), almost always abreviated Kansai Gaidai (関西外大), is located in Hirakata, Osaka, Japan. ... Nanzan University ) is a private, coeducational university located in Aichi, Japan. ... Sophia University ) is a private university, with its main campus located in Yotsuya, an area of Tokyos Chiyoda Ward in Japan. ... Dortmund University (German: Universität Dortmund) is a university in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany with over 20,000 students, and over 3,000 staff. ... The Venn Building The University of Hull, also known as Hull University, is an English university located in Hull (or Kingston upon Hull), a city in the East Riding of Yorkshire. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


John Carroll University's Sponsored Programs are either administered by John Carroll University or by another Jesuit University. In certain cases, John Carroll University faculty accompany and remain abroad with the students the entire semester. These programs include the Belfast Institute in Peace Building and Conflict Transformation [6], the Boler School of Business Semester in London [7] , Italian Studies at Vatican City, the London Liberal Arts Semester as well as Casa de la Solidaridad in El Salvador and The Jesuit Beijing Center. This article is about the city in Northern Ireland. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... “Italian Republic” redirects here. ...


All international programs, including those for international students who study at John Carroll, are managed by the University's Center for Global Education.


Rankings

In the 2007 U.S. News & World Report annual guide "America's Best Colleges," John Carroll University tied for fifth overall among Midwestern Universities - Master's I. This was the 18th consecutive year that John Carroll had ranked in the top 10 on this list. JCU also ranked second among Midwestern - Master's I in average graduation rate (75 percent), and was 12th on the "Great Schools, Great Prices" list. [8] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...


Student life

Athletics

JCU has 21 varsity sports teams and are known as the Blue Streaks. The teams play in the NCAA's Division III Ohio Athletic Conference. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Ohio Athletic Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Ohio. ...


The school's football team plays in Don Shula Stadium, named after one of the school's most-famous alumni. The stadium opened in 2003. Its namesake contributed to the stadium's construction, as did Washington Redskins star London Fletcher, another graduate. Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... London Levi Fletcher (born May 19, 1975 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American football linebacker who currently plays for the Buffalo Bills of the NFL. Recently it was discovered that he will be playing with the name London Fletcher-Baker in 2006. ...


Housing[9]

John Carroll is a primarily residential campus, with over 60% of all students living on campus in eight residence halls; 90% of freshmen and sophomores live on campus.


Freshman Residences

During a students first year, they are placed in one of three freshman residence halls:

  • Pacelli Hall (named after Eugenio Pacelli (Pope Pius XII)), and Sutowski Hall are single gender dormitories, and have capacities of 216 and 171 students, respectively. Depending on the gender proportions of each freshman class, the hall assignments vary. (In 2007, men were assigned to Sutowski Hall while the women were assigned to Pacelli. In 2006, the opposite assignments were made.)[10][11]
  • Murphy Hall houses 408 freshman students. Murphy Hall is coed, with both male and female residents sharing the same building although not the same wing of the building. Every Murphy Hall room is designed in a Suite-style dorm. Each resident of Murphy Hall shares a room with one other person, and a moderate living area with two others.[12]

Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Upperclassman Residences

The other five residence halls house upperclassmen. All are coed but rooms are separated by gender in different wings of each hall.

  • Campion Hall is the newest of all the residence halls. It was built in 1990 as "Gnu Hall" but was dedicated to St. Edmund Campion on November 13, 1993. It houses 306 upperclassmen and has standard dormitory style rooms.[13]
  • Dolan Hall was completed in 1955 and is dedicated to Thomas F. Dolan. From 1994 to 2006, Dolan Hall was an all female dormitory but in 2007 it was changed to a co-ed, "Super-Single" style dorm with 214 students living in individual rooms.[14]
  • Hamlin Hall was built in 1988 and is dedicated to Richard M. Hamlin, a John Carroll University alumnus. 294 students reside within its walls, in standard dormitory style rooms. Hamlin Hall is also furnished with a complete kitchen, available for use by any of its residents.[15]
  • Millor Hall was finished in 1981. Though it is not known why, this building on the West side of campus was originally named "South Hall" but was later changed as a dedication to Rev. William J. Millor in October of that year. 242 students reside in Millor Hall.[16]
  • Bernet Hall was the first dormitory erected on campus in 1935. It was built at the recommendation of a major supporter of the University and its namesake, John J. Bernet, who called for a place to house those "boys from Greater Cleveland who will be forced to go home every night." It was remodeled from its original design and is now the home of 100 seniors, each of whom has an apartment style dormitory with either 2, 4 or 6 students per apartment.[17]

Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... “Alumni” redirects here. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article discusses the number Four. ... Look up six in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Notable alumni

Media

Robert David Sanders Novak (born February 26, 1931) is a conservative American political commentator. ... Timothy John Russert, Jr. ... Meet the Press (MTP) is a weekly television news show produced by NBC. It started as a radio show in 1945 as American Mercury Presents: Meet the Press, originating from WRC-AM in Washington. ...

Politics/Government/Military

Interior of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Exterior of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum viewed from Raoul Wallenberg Place (15th St. ... Anthony Joseph Celebrezze Sr. ... Nickname: Motto: Progress & Prosperity Location in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA Coordinates: , Country State County Cuyahoga Founded 1796 Incorporated 1814 (village)   1836 (city) Government  - Mayor Frank G. Jackson (D) Area [1]  - City  82. ... Frank D. Celebrezze IWas born Cleveland, Ohio May 12, 1899. ... Anthony Joseph Celebrezze Sr. ... Bernard Chapin (1969-) is a libertarian and conservative writer who mostly addresses cultural and political issues. ... Anne C. Conway (born 1950) is a federal judge. ... A United States federal judge is a judge appointed by the President of the United States and confirmed by the United States Senate in accordance with Article III of the United States Constitution. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Cranley John Cranley is an American politician of the Democratic Party, who currently serves as a member of the city council of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... A city council is the most common style of legislative government in a city or town. ... “Cincinnati” redirects here. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Major General Carter F. Ham (born February 16, 1952) is the current Commander, U.S. 1st Infantry Division. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... The 1st Infantry Division of the United States Army —nicknamed “The Big Red One” after its shoulder patch—is the oldest continuously serving division in the United States Army. ... Tom Murphy (born August 15, 1944) is a Democratic politician from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... “Pittsburgh” redirects here. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Mary Rose Oakar (b. ... Carl E. Walz (COLONEL, USAF) is a NASA astronaut. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require removal of excess red links (links to non-existent articles). ...

Business

Hendrickson is a privately-held company that designs and manufactures commercial full size truck suspensions. ... The Sherwin-Williams Company (NYSE: SHW) is a Cleveland, Ohio, USA-based company in the general building materials industry. ... Carnival Cruise Lines is a cruise line operating a large number of cruise ships. ... Charles Francis Chuck Dolan (born on October 16, 1926 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American business executive. ... For other uses, see Cablevision (disambiguation). ... Tim J. Donahue has served as president and chief executive officer of Nextel since August 1999. ... Sprint Nextel Corporation (NYSE: S) is one of the largest telecommunications companies in the world. ... George Steele, better known as George The Animal Steele, real name James Myers (b. ... PETCO (NASDAQ: PETC) is a leading chain of retail stores that offers pet supplies and services such as grooming and dog training. ... John Rooney is a sports announcer, formerly radio announcer for the Chicago White Sox John Rooney may also refer to: John J. Rooney (1903–1975), American Democratic Party politician from New York John Rooney (Irish politician), Irish Farmerss Party TD for Dublin County 1922–1923 John E. Rooney, American... U.S. Cellular (NYSE: USM) is a super-regional cellular telephone provider, serving 5. ...

Sports

Tom Arth (born May 11, 1981 in Westlake, OH) is a Canadian Football League quarterback for the Toronto Argonauts. ... City Indianapolis, Indiana Team colors Speed Blue and White Head Coach Tony Dungy Owner Jim Irsay General manager Bill Polian Mascot Blue [1] League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South... “Packers” redirects here. ... Enrique Edward Ecker (born January 21, 1922 in Cleveland, Ohio) was an American football offensive lineman for the NFL and the short-lived All-America Football Conference. ... London Levi Fletcher-Baker (born May 19, 1975 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American football linebacker who currently plays for the Washington Redskins of the NFL. Until 2006 he was known as simply London Fletcher. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Navy blue, light blue, Red, light Red, White, Royal, and Nickel Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph Wilson General manager Marv Levy Mascot Billy Buffalo League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... For other uses, see Redskins (disambiguation). ... Josh McDaniels is the current offensive coordinator and former quarterbacks coach for the NFLs New England Patriots. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present) American Football... Dominique Helena Moceanu (born September 30, 1981 in Hollywood, California) is an American gymnast of Romanian descent who was a member of the Olympic Gold medal winning 1996 U.S. Womens Gymnastics team in Atlanta (the Magnificent 7). The hallmarks of Moceanus gymnastics, in the early stage of... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, and kinesthetic awareness, such as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Assorted ancient Bronze castings found as part of a cache, probably intended for recycling. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... Charles John Priefer (born July 26, 1941 in Parma, Ohio) was born in the 1940s on July 26 in Parma, Ohio. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... The Indianapolis Colts are a professional football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner H. Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference... Carl Taseff (September 28, 1928 - February 27, 2005) was an American football player and assistant coach. ... The Indianapolis Colts are a professional football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... City Orchard Park, New York Team colors Navy blue, light blue, Red, light Red, White, Royal, and Nickel Head Coach Dick Jauron Owner Ralph Wilson General manager Marv Levy Mascot Billy Buffalo League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach Cam Cameron Owner H. Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference...

Religious

Anthony Michael Pilla (born November 12, 1932 in Cleveland, Ohio) was bishop of the Diocese of Cleveland. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      This article is about a title... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland (Latin: Dioecesis Clevelandensis) is a Roman Catholic diocese in Ohio. ... Bishop Richard Pates, current auxiliary bishop of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis and the Titular Bishop of Suacia. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland (Latin: Dioecesis Clevelandensis) is a Roman Catholic diocese in Ohio. ... His Excellency, The Most Reverend Donald E. Pelotte, SSS is the third Catholic bishop of the Diocese of Gallup, New Mexico. ... The Roman Catholic Diocese of Gallup is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the southwestern region of the United States, encompassing counties in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...

Academics

Paul Aimé Fleury (born 1939) is an American physicist and academic administrator. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Kevin P. Granata (December 29, 1961 – April 16, 2007) was an adjunct professor in multiple departments including the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... The Virginia Tech massacre was a school shooting comprising two separate attacks about two hours apart on April 16, 2007, on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducation public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... John A. Hardon, S.J. (June 18, 1914 - December 30, 2000) was a Catholic priest, writer, and theologian. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Tom Filsinger (February 11, 1957— ) is the creator of Champions of the Galaxy and Legends of Wrestling card and dice role playing games. ...

Entertainment

Eric Howard Carmen (born August 11, 1949, in Cleveland, Ohio, USA) is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and keyboardist. ... Jack Riley (December 30, 1935—) is a comedic actor probably most recognizable as the irrascible character Elliot Carlin from Bob Newharts first TV sitcom, The Bob Newhart Show. ...

Other

Mugshot of David Ferrie, August 8, 1961. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Earling Carothers Jim Garrison (November 20, 1921 - October 21, 1992) — who changed his first name to simply Jim in the early 60s — was the Democratic District Attorney of Orleans Parish, Louisiana from 1962 to 1973; he is best known for his investigations into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Tom Filsinger (February 11, 1957— ) is the creator of Champions of the Galaxy and Legends of Wrestling card and dice role playing games. ...

Notable Faculty

Francesco Cesareo, Ph. ... This article is about the college in Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. For other colleges of the same name see Assumption College (disambiguation) Assumption College is a private, Catholic, liberal arts college located on 175 acres (708,000 m²) in Worcester, Massachusetts. ... Sarah Willis is a novelist and short story writer. ... George Bilgere (b. ... Steven Hayward is a novelist and short story writer born in Toronto, Canada. ...

See also

The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... The Brotherhood of Iota Phi Theta was a local service fraternity at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio, from 1973 to 2001, whose colors of Iota Phi Theta were brown and gold. ... The Ohio Athletic Conference is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in Ohio. ... WJCU is a non-commercial FM radio station at John Carroll University in University Heights, Ohio broadcasting at 88. ... The Carroll News is the student-run, co-curricular newspaper at John Carroll University, in University Heights, Ohio. ...

Notes

  1. ^ John Carroll University Quick Facts. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  2. ^ History of the Biology Department of John Carroll University. Ohio Journal of Science. Retrieved on 2006-10-03.
  3. ^ History of the Biology Department of John Carroll University. Ohio Journal of Science. Retrieved on 2006-10-03.
  4. ^ John Carroll University. About, Inc.. Retrieved on 2006-10-03.
  5. ^ The Center for Global Education - Studying Abroad. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  6. ^ Belfast Institute in Peace Building and Conflict Transformation. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  7. ^ The Boler London Semester. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-09-18.
  8. ^ John Carroll University Prospective Students - Quick Facts. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-10-02.
  9. ^ John Student Affairs - Residence Life for First Year Students. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2006-10-02.
  10. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Sutowski Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  11. ^ [Phttp://www.jcu.edu/studentl/reslife/halls/pacelli.htm JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Pacelli Hall]. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  12. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Murphy Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  13. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Campion Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  14. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Dolan Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  15. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Hamlin Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  16. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Millor Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.
  17. ^ JCU Student Affairs -- Residence Halls: Bernet Hall. John Carroll University. Retrieved on 2007-08-20.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Carroll University (190 words)
John Carroll University hopes that you will find the information at this web site helpful and easy to use, but it provides the information "as is" and makes no representations or warranties of any kind regarding it.
JCU disclaims all liability of any kind whatsoever arising out of your use of, or inability to use, this server and the information contained on it.
John Carroll University maintains this web site to support its mission and to be of service to its students and their parents; to faculty, staff, alumni, friends and supporters; as well as to the general public.
John Carroll University (83 words)
John Carroll University is affiliated with the Jesuits and is located in University Heights, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland.
The university was founded in 1886 and originally named St. Ignatius College.
It was renamed John Carroll University in 1923 in honor of the first Roman Catholic archbishop in the United States.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m