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Encyclopedia > John Carpenter
John Carpenter
Birth name John Howard Carpenter
Born January 16, 1948 (1948-01-16) (age 59)
Carthage, New York, U.S.A.
Occupation director, screenwriter, producer, composer
Spouse(s) Adrienne Barbeau (1979-1984)
Sandy King (1990-)

John Howard Carpenter (born January 16, 1948) is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, film score composer and occasional actor. Carpenter has worked in numerous film genres, and is considered one of the most accomplished and influential horror and science fiction directors in Hollywood. John Carpenter is the name of several people: John Carpenter (born 1948), an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film music composer. ... If you hold the copyright to an image (e. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Carthage is a village located in the Town of Wilna in Jefferson County, New York. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Adrienne Jo Barbeau (born June 11, 1945) is an American television, film, and musical theater actress. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Special Effects: ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... The following are a list of Saturn Award winners for Best Music: Category: ... Vampires (also known as John Carpenters Vampires) is an action/horror film directed by John Carpenter in 1998. ... The film director, on the right, gives last minute direction to the cast and crew, whilst filming a costume drama on location in London. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... For other uses, see Actor (disambiguation). ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... ...

Contents

Biography

Early life

Carpenter was born in Carthage, New York, the son of Milton Jean (née Carter) and Howard Ralph Carpenter, a music professor.[1] He and his family moved to Bowling Green, Kentucky in 1953.[2] He was captivated by movies from an early age, particularly the westerns of Howard Hawks and John Ford, as well as 1950s low budget horror and science fiction films, such as Forbidden Planet and The Thing from Another World[3] and began filming horror shorts on 8 mm film even before entering high school.[4] He briefly attended Western Kentucky University where his father chaired the music department, but transferred to the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts in 1968. Though he dropped out before finishing his degree, his student project, The Resurrection of Broncho Billy, won the 1970 Academy Award for Live Action Short Film.[2] The film was produced by John Longenecker.[citation needed] Carthage is a village located in the Town of Wilna in Jefferson County, New York. ... Née redirects here. ... Location of Bowling Green within Warren County in Kentucky. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... For other persons named John Ford, see John Ford (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1956 film. ... The Thing from Another World is a 1951 science fiction film which tells the story of an Air Force crew and scientists at a remote Arctic research outpost who fight a malevolent alien being. ... This article is about the 8 mm film format. ... Western Kentucky University (WKU) is a public university in Bowling Green, Kentucky. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The USC School of Cinematic Arts, formerly named the School of Cinema-Television (CNTV), is a film school within the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California. ... The Resurrection of Broncho Billy (1970) is an Academy Award winning live action short film. ... // This name for the Academy Award for Live Action Short Film was introduced in 1974. ... John Longenecker (born 1947) is an American Film producer, cinematographer and screenwriter who won an Academy Award for producing the live action short film, The Resurrection of Broncho Billy in 1970. ...


1970s: From student films to major theatrical releases

His first major film as director, Dark Star (1974), was a sci-fi black comedy that he cowrote with Dan O'Bannon (who later went on to write Alien, borrowing freely from much of Dark Star). The film reportedly cost only $60,000 and was difficult to make as both Carpenter and O'Bannon completed the film by multitasking, with Carpenter doing the musical score as well as the writing, producing and directing, while O'Bannon acted in the film and did the special effects (which caught the attention of George Lucas who hired him to do work on the special effects for Star Wars). Carpenter's efforts did not go unnoticed as much of Hollywood marveled at his filmmaking abilities within the confines of a shoestring budget.[5] This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ... Dan OBannon (born Daniel Thomas OBannon on September 30, 1946 in St. ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... George Walton Lucas, Jr. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


Carpenter's next film was Assault on Precinct 13 (1976), a low-budget thriller influenced by the films of Howard Hawks, particularly Rio Bravo. As with Dark Star, Carpenter was responsible for many aspects of the film's creation. He not only wrote, directed and scored it, but also edited the film under the pseudonym "John T. Chance" (the name of John Wayne's character in Rio Bravo). Carpenter has said that he considers Assault on Precinct 13 to have been his first real film because it was the first movie that he shot on a schedule.[6] The film was also significant because it marked the first time Carpenter worked with Debra Hill, who played prominently in the making of some of Carpenter's most important films. Assault on Precinct 13 is a 1976 action / thriller movie, directed by John Carpenter. ... John Wayne as Sheriff John T. Chance in the opening scene. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... Debra Hill (November 10, 1950–March 7, 2005) was an American screenwriter and film producer who co-wrote the horror movie Halloween. ...


Working within the limitations of a $100,000 budget,[7] Carpenter assembled a main cast that consisted of experienced but relatively obscure actors. The two leads were Austin Stoker, who had appeared previously in science fiction, disaster and blaxploitation films, and Darwin Joston, who had worked primarily in television and had once been Carpenter's next-door neighbor.[8] Austin Stoker (b. ... Shaft (1971) Blaxploitation is a film genre that emerged in the United States in the early 1970s when many exploitation films were made that targeted the urban black audience; the word itself is a portmanteau of the words “black” and “exploitation. ... F. Darwin Solomon (December 9, 1937- June 1, 1998) was an American actor known professionally as Darwin Joston (sometimes credited as Darwin Jostin during the early years of his career ). A North Carolina native, Joston was born in Winston-Salem and graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel...


The film was originally released in the United States to mixed critical reviews and lackluster box-office earnings, but after it was screened at the 1977 London Film Festival, it became a critical and commercial success in Europe and is often credited with launching Carpenter's career. The film subsequently received a critical reassessment in the United States, where it is now generally regarded as one of the best exploitation films of the 1970s. The Times BFI London Film Festival is the UKs largest public film event, screening 300 films from 60 countries. ... Grindhouse redirects here. ...


A long forgotten, but still very note worthy film that Carpenter both wrote and directed was the Lauren Hutton thriller Someone's Watching Me! (aka High Rise) in 1978, a very busy year for the director.[9] This made-for-television movie tells a very simplistic, yet rather effective tale of a single, working woman who, shortly after arriving in L.A., discovers that she is gradually being stalked and constantly observed by an unseen predator in the high rise building across from her apartment. Though a made-for-television film, Someone's Watching Me! does stand out from others of the period. Borrowing heavily from Hitchcock classics, Carpenter slowly builds the suspense and intrigue before the final confrontation ensues, making the most out of the theory that what one can't see is far more interesting than what is gratuitously featured on the screen. Although it has never received much attention, it's interesting to draw some parallels between the story, concept, and visuals in this film with those featured in the director's next immediate production, Halloween. Halloween (film) redirects here. ...


Halloween (1978) was a smash hit on release and helped give birth to the slasher film genre. Originally an idea suggested by producer Irwin Yablans (entitled The Babysitter Murders), who envisioned a film about babysitters being menaced by a stalker, Carpenter took the idea and another suggestion from Yablans that it take place during Halloween and developed a story.[10] Carpenter said of the basic concept: "Halloween night. It has never been the theme in a film. My idea was to do an old haunted house movie."[11] The film was written by Carpenter and Debra Hill with Carpenter admitting that the film was inspired by both Dario Argento's Suspiria and William Friedkin's The Exorcist. Carpenter again worked with a relatively small budget, $320,000.[12] The film grossed over $65 million initially, making it one of the most successful independent films of all time.[13] The original 1974 Black Christmas is considered the first authentic slasher. ... Irwin Yablans (born July 25, 1934, in Brooklyn, New York) is an independent film producer and distributor known for his work in the horror film industry. ... Dario Argento (born September 7, 1940) is an Italian film director, producer and screenwriter. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Friedkin (born August 29, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American movie and television director, producer and screenwriter best known for directing The Exorcist and The French Connection in the early 1970s. ... The Exorcist is an Academy Award-winning 1973 American horror and thriller film, adapted from the 1971 novel of the same name by William Peter Blatty, dealing with the demonic possession of a young girl, and her mother’s desperate attempts to win back her daughter through an exorcism conducted...


Carpenter relied upon taut suspense rather than the excessive gore that would define later slasher films in order to make the menacing nature of the main character, Michael Myers, more palpable. At times, Carpenter has described Halloween in terms that appeared to directly contradict the more thoughtful, nuanced approach to horror that he actually used, such as: "True crass exploitation. I decided to make a film I would love to have seen as a kid, full of cheap tricks like a haunted house at a fair where you walk down the corridor and things jump out at you."[14] The film has often been cited as an allegory on the virtue of sexual purity and the danger of casual sex, although Carpenter has explained that this was not his intent: "It has been suggested that I was making some kind of moral statement. Believe me, I'm not. In Halloween, I viewed the characters as simply normal teenagers."[15] Of the later slasher films that largely mimicked Carpenter's work on Halloween, few have met with the same critical success. Michael Myers is a fictional character from the Halloween film series. ...


In addition to the film's critical and commercial success, perhaps its strongest legacy is the film's original score by Carpenter, which remains one of the most recognizable film music themes of all time along with other notable scores such as John Williams' Jaws.[16] For other persons named John Williams, see John Williams (disambiguation). ... Jaws is a 1975 thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel inspired by the Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916. ...


In 1979, John Carpenter began what was to be the first of several collaborations with actor Kurt Russell when he directed the TV movie Elvis. The made-for-TV movie was a smash hit with viewers and critics and revived the career of Russell, who was a child actor in the 1960s. Kurt Vogel Russell (born March 17, 1951) is an American actor. ...


1980s: Continued commercial success

Carpenter followed up the success of Halloween with The Fog (1980), a ghostly revenge tale (co-written by Hill) inspired by horror comics such as Tales from the Crypt[17] and by The Crawling Eye, a 1958 movie about monsters hiding in clouds.[18] The Fog is a 1980 horror movie directed by John Carpenter, who also wrote the screenplay and composed the music of the film. ... The original title, Crime Patrol. ... Categories: Movie stubs | 1958 films | Science fiction films | Mystery Science Theater 3000 ...


Completing The Fog was an unusually difficult process for Carpenter. After viewing a rough cut of the film, he was dissatisfied with the result. For the first and only time in his filmmaking career, he had to devise a way to salvage a nearly finished film that did not meet his standards. In order to make the movie more coherent and frightening, Carpenter shot additional footage that included a number of new scenes. Approximately one-third of the finished film is comprised of the newer footage.


Despite production problems and mostly negative critical reception, The Fog was another commercial success for Carpenter. The film was made on a budget of $1,000,000, but it grossed over $21,000,000 in the United States alone.[19] Carpenter has said that The Fog is not his favorite film, although he considers it a "minor horror classic".[20]


Carpenter immediately followed The Fog with the science-fiction adventure Escape from New York (1981), which quickly picked up large cult and mainstream audiences as well as critical acclaim. Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ...


His next film, The Thing (1982), is notable for its high production values, including innovative special effects by Rob Bottin, special visual effects by matte artist Albert Whitlock, a score by Ennio Morricone and a cast including rising star Kurt Russell and respected character actors such as Wilford Brimley, Richard Dysart, Keith David, and Richard Masur. The Thing was made with a budget of $10,000,000,[21] Carpenter's largest up to that point, and distributed by Universal Pictures. The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film, directed by John Carpenter. ... Rob Bottin was born in 1959 in the Los Angeles suburb of El Monte. ... the famous matte Albert J Whitlock (September 15, 1915 in London – October 26, 1999 in Santa Barbara, California) was an English motion picture matte artist best known for his work with Disney and Universal Studios. ... Ennio Morricone (born November 10, 1928; sometimes also credited as Dan Savio or Leo Nichols) is an Italian composer especially noted for his film scores. ... Allen Wilford Brimley (September 27, 1934) is an American character actor. ... Richard Dysart (b. ... Keith David (born June 4, 1956) is an Emmy Award winning, African-American film, television, and voice actor most known for his roles as Childs in John Carpenters The Thing, Goliath in the cartoon Gargoyles, playing the Arbiter in Halo 2 and Halo 3, as well as voice overs... Richard Masur (born 20 November 1948, New York, New York) is an actor who has starred in over 80 movies during his career. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ...


Although Carpenter's film was ostensibly a remake of the 1951 Howard Hawks film, The Thing from Another World, Carpenter's version is more faithful to the John W. Campbell, Jr. short story, Who Goes There?, upon which both films were based. Moreover, unlike the Hawks film, The Thing has a dark, pessimistic tone and a bleak ending, which didn't appeal to audiences in the summer of 1982, when it was released in the wake of E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. Consequently, it did not perform well commercially and was Carpenter's first financial failure. Later, the movie found new life in the home video and cable markets, and it is now widely regarded as one of the best horror films ever made. The Thing from Another World is a 1951 science fiction film which tells the story of an Air Force crew and scientists at a remote Arctic research outpost who fight a malevolent alien being. ... John Wood Campbell, Jr. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the Atari 2600 video game based on the movie, see E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Atari 2600). ...


Carpenter's next film, Christine, was the 1983 adaptation of the Stephen King novel of the same name. The story revolves around a high-school nerd named Arnie Cunningham (Keith Gordon) who buys a junked 1958 Plymouth Fury which turns out to have supernatural powers. As Cunningham restores and rebuilds the car, he becomes unnaturally obsessed with it, with deadly consequences. Christine did respectable business upon its release and was received well by critics; however, Carpenter has been quoted as saying he directed the film because it was the only thing offered to him at the time.[22] Christine (also known as John Carpenters Christine) is a horror film about a supernaturally malevolent automobile and its effects on the teenager who owns it, adapted from a novel written by Stephen King. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... Keith Gordon (born February 3, 1961 in New York City) is an American actor and film director. ... Jan. ... The Plymouth Fury was an automobile made by the Plymouth division of the Chrysler Corporation from 1956 to 1978. ...


One of the high points in Carpenter's career came in 1984 with the release of Starman, a film that was critically praised but was only a moderate commercial success.[23] Produced by Michael Douglas, the script was well received by Columbia Pictures, which chose it over the script for E.T. and prompted Steven Spielberg to go to Universal Pictures. Douglas chose Carpenter to be the director because of his reputation as an action director who could also convey strong emotion.[24] Starman was favorably reviewed by the Los Angeles Times, New York Times and LA Weekly and described by Carpenter as a film he envisioned as a romantic comedy similar to It Happened One Night only with a space alien.[25] The film received Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for Jeff Bridges' portrayal of Starman and received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Musical Score for Jack Nitzsche. Starman (1984; see also 1984 in film) is a science fiction film directed by John Carpenter which tells the story of an alien from another planet (Jeff Bridges) who has come to Earth in response to the invitation left of the gold phonograph record on the Voyager space probes. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation) Michael Kirk Douglas (born September 25, 1944) is an American actor and producer, primarily in movies and television. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... ET (or et) is Latin for and; it can also refer to: Estonian language (ISO 639 alpha-2, et) E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, the 1982 film, or the related video game extraterrestrials in general Eastern Time, both in standard time and daylight time Entertainment Tonight engineering technology elapsed time... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Universal Pictures is the main motion picture production/distribution arm of Universal Studios, a subsidiary of NBC Universal. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... L.A. Weekly is a free weekly tabloid-sized newspaper (a so-called alternative weekly) in Los Angeles, California. ... It Happened One Night is a 1934 romantic comedy directed by Frank Capra, in which a pampered socialite (Claudette Colbert) tries to get out from under her fathers thumb, and falls in love with a roguish reporter (Clark Gable). ... The Academy Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role is one of the awards given to actors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Jeffrey Leon Bridges (born December 4, 1949) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Bernard Alfred (Jack) Nitzsche (Chicago, April 22, 1937 – Hollywood, August 25, 2000) was an integral presence in the history of popular music in the 20th century. ...


Following the box office failure of his big budget action-comedy Big Trouble in Little China (1986) Carpenter struggled to get films financed. He returned to making lower budget films such as Prince of Darkness (1987), a film influenced by the BBC series Quatermass. Although some of the films from this time did pick up a cult audience, he never again realized his mass-market potential. Big Trouble in Little China (also known as John Carpenters Big Trouble in Little China) is a 1986 comedy/action film, directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell and Kim Cattrall, set in San Franciscos Chinatown. ... Prince of Darkness is a 1987 American horror film directed, written and scored by John Carpenter, starring Donald Pleasence, Victor Wong and Jameson Parker. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Professor Bernard Quatermass is a fictional character, created by the writer Nigel Kneale originally for BBC Television, who appeared in three influential BBC science fiction serials of the 1950s, and made his swansong in a final serial for Thames Television in 1979. ...


1990s: Criticism and commercial decline

His recent career is characterized by a number of notable misfires: Memoirs of an Invisible Man (1992), Village of the Damned (1995) and Escape From L.A. (1996) are examples of films that were critical and box office failures. Notable from this decade is: Memoirs of an Invisible Man is a 1992 film directed by John Carpenter and released by Warner Bros. ... John Carpenters Village of the Damned is an English language 1995 science fiction–horror film directed by John Carpenter. ... Escape From L.A. (also known as John Carpenters Escape From L.A.) is a 1996 film directed by John Carpenter. ...

  • In the Mouth of Madness (1995), yet another Lovecraftian homage which, although did not do well at the box-office either and was seen by some critics as reminiscent of Wes Craven's New Nightmare, is considered by many Carpenter devotees as his last truly great full-length movie.
  • Vampires (1998) starred James Woods as the leader of a band of vampire hunters in league with the Catholic church. Though not a big success at the box-office, Woods' performance was praised by many critics, and the late critic Gene Siskel went so far as to say he thought the actor deserved an Oscar nomination for the film. Like many of Carpenter's films, Vampires went on to achieve a cult following, and a direct-to-video sequel was made in 2002 starring Jon Bon Jovi.

In the Mouth of Madness (also known as John Carpenters In the Mouth of Madness) is a 1995 horror film (originally intended for a 1994 release) directed by John Carpenter and written by Michael de Luca, who was at the time in charge of New Line Cinema. ... Wes Cravens New Nightmare (1994) is the seventh entry in the Nightmare on Elm Street series of slasher films. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Jon Bon Jovi (born John Francis Bongiovi, Jr. ...

2000s-present: Remakes and Masters of Horror

Carpenter's reputation remains strong; his earlier films are considered classics and (because they have continued to perform well on home video) several have been subjected to big budget remakes. 2005 saw remakes of Assault on Precinct 13 and The Fog, the latter being produced by Carpenter himself, though in an interview he defined his involvement as, "I come in and say hello to everybody. Go home."[26]


More recently, Rob Zombie has, with Carpenter's approval, produced and directed Halloween (2007 film), a re-imagining of John Carpenter's 1978 film. It was released in 2007. Robert Cummings (born January 12, 1965 in Haverhill, Massachusetts), better known as Rob Zombie, is an American musician, film director, and writer. ... Halloween is a reimagining of the 1978 film of the same name. ...


Carpenter returned to the director's chair in 2005 for an episode of Showtime's Masters of Horror series as one of the thirteen filmmakers involved in the first season. His episode, Cigarette Burns, aired to generally positive reviews, and positive reactions from Carpenter fans, many of whom regard it as on par with his earlier horror classics. He has since contributed another original episode for the show's second season entitled Pro-Life, about a young girl who is raped and impregnated by a demon and wants to have an abortion, but whose efforts are halted by her fanatic, gun-toting father and her three brothers. This article is about the pay TV channel. ... Masters of Horror is an American television series created by director Mick Garris for the Showtime cable network. ... Cigarette Burns is the eighth episode of the first season of Masters of Horror. ... Pro-Life is the fifth episode of the second season of Masters of Horror. ...


A remake of Escape from New York is now planned starring Gerard Butler as Snake Plissken. Brett Ratner will direct the film. Gerard James Butler (born November 13, 1969) is a Scottish actor known to American audiences for his portrayal of King Leonidas in 300 and The Phantom in the 2004 film version of The Phantom of the Opera. ... Brett Ratner (born March 28, 1969) is an American film director and music-video director. ...


Techniques

His films are characterized by minimalist lighting and photography, static cameras, use of steadicam, and distinctive synthesized scores (usually self-composed). He describes himself as having been influenced by Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Nigel Kneale and The Twilight Zone. To film this recreated Victorian London street scene, the cameraman next to the lamp post is using a steadicam and wearing the harness required to support it. ... Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and writer of the classic Hollywood era. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Nigel Kneale (born Thomas Nigel Kneale on April 18, 1922 in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, England, UK) is a Manx television and film scriptwriter, who has worked mostly in the UK. He is best known for his creation of the character of Professor Bernard Quatermass, who has appeared in three... The Twilight Zone title. ...


With the exception of The Thing, Starman, and Memoirs of an Invisible Man, he has scored all of his films (though some are collaborations), most famously the themes from Halloween and Assault on Precinct 13. His music is generally synthesized with accompaniment from piano and atmospherics. A short grand piano, with the lid up. ... Atmosphere may refer to: a celestial body atmosphere, e. ...


Carpenter is a big fan of widescreen, and all of his theatrical movies (with the exception of Dark Star) have been filmed in anamorphic with an aspect ratio 2.35:1. Most of Carpenter's movies use the director-possessive title, as in John Carpenter's The Thing. One of the few exceptions to this was Memoirs of an Invisible Man. The inner box (green) is the format used in most pre-1952 films and pre-widescreen television. ... Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35mm film. ...


Legacy

With a career that has spanned over thirty years, John Carpenter has attained a reputation as a respected independent filmmaker. Many horror/sci-fi/indie filmmakers have expressed admiration for Carpenter's work, including Robert Rodriguez, Paul W.S. Anderson, Guillermo Del Toro, Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino. Robert Anthony Rodriguez (born June 20, 1968) is an American writer and film director who is known for making profitable, crowd-pleasing independent and studio films with fairly low budgets and fast schedules by Hollywood standards. ... Paul William Scott Anderson (Born: March 4, 1965 in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England, United Kingdom-) is a British filmmaker, producer and screenwriter. ... Guillermo del Toro Gómez (born October 9, 1964 in Guadalajara, Jalisco) is an Academy Award-nominated Mexican film director. ... Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970[1] in Studio City, California) is a two-time Oscar nominated American filmmaker. ... Quentin Jerome Tarantino (born March 27, 1963) is a Palme dOr-winning American film director, actor, and an Oscar winning screenwriter. ...


Although some of Carpenter's films have not been commercially or critically successful upon initial theatrical release, Carpenter has developed a large cult following through home video releases of his films. Many of his films, most notably The Thing, have been rediscovered on VHS, laserdisc and DVD and have since been embraced by many fans - interesting, as The Thing was initially Carpenter's first big setback. The film was considered excessively dark, did not do well at the box office and Rob Bottin's effects were considered too grotesque for a mainstream audience. Retrospectively, the film has gained much critical appreciation.


Four years later, Big Trouble in Little China was also poorly received by audiences and critics alike, an eclectic mix of genres that was years ahead of its time. This film, like The Thing, found its audience on VHS and DVD years after its theatrical release.


Many of Carpenter's films have been re-released on DVD as special editions with numerous bonus features. Examples of such are: the collector's editions of Halloween, Escape From New York, Christine,The Thing, Assault on Precinct 13, and The Fog. Some have been re-issued recently with a new anamorphic widescreen transfer. In the UK, several of Carpenter's films have been released on DVD with audio commentary by Carpenter and his stars (They Live, with actor/wrestler Roddy Piper, Starman with actor Jeff Bridges and Prince of Darkness with actor Peter Jason) that have not been released in the United States . Roderick George Toombs (born April 17, 1954) better known by his ring name Rowdy Roddy Piper, is a Canadian professional wrestler, and film actor. ...


In recent years, Carpenter has been the subject of the documentary film, John Carpenter: The Man and His Movies, and his status as a respected filmmaker has been reinforced by American Cinematheque's 2002 retrospective of his films. Moreover, in 2006, the United States Library of Congress deemed Halloween to be "culturally significant" and selected it for preservation in the National Film Registry.[27] The American Cinematheque is an independent, non-profit cultural organization in Los Angeles dedicated exclusively to the public presentation of the Moving Picture in all its forms. ... The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Personal life

Carpenter was romantically involved with his creative partner, Debra Hill, from the time they worked on Assault on Precinct 13 until Carpenter met his future wife, actress Adrienne Barbeau, on the set of his 1978 television movie, Someone's Watching Me. Adrienne Jo Barbeau (born June 11, 1945) is an American television, film, and musical theater actress. ...


Despite the end of their romantic relationship, Carpenter and Hill continued to collaborate on films and were able to maintain their friendship. Working with both Carpenter and Barbeau on The Fog, however, was reportedly an emotionally difficult experience for Hill.[28]


Carpenter was married to Barbeau from January 1, 1979 to 1984. During their marriage, Barbeau starred in The Fog, and also appeared in Escape from New York. The couple have one son, John Cody Carpenter (born May 7, 1984).


Carpenter has been married to producer Sandy King since 1990. King produced a number of Carpenter's later feature films, including: They Live, In the Mouth of Madness, Ghosts of Mars and Escape from L.A. She also functioned as script supervisor for some of these films as well as Starman, Big Trouble in Little China and Prince of Darkness.[29]


Filmography

Upcoming films

  • The Prince (2008 / 2009)
  • Psychopath (2008 / 2009)

Released films

Ghosts of Mars (also known as John Carpenters Ghosts of Mars) is a 2001 movie directed by John Carpenter, which in its basic themes is similar to his earlier film, Assault on Precinct 13. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Escape From L.A. (also known as John Carpenters Escape From L.A.) is a 1996 film directed by John Carpenter. ... John Carpenters Village of the Damned is an English language 1995 science fiction–horror film directed by John Carpenter. ... In the Mouth of Madness (also known as John Carpenters In the Mouth of Madness) is a 1995 horror film (originally intended for a 1994 release) directed by John Carpenter and written by Michael de Luca, who was at the time in charge of New Line Cinema. ... Memoirs of an Invisible Man is a 1992 film directed by John Carpenter and released by Warner Bros. ... They Live is a 1988 film directed by John Carpenter, who also wrote the screenplay under the pseudonym “Frank Armitage”. The movie is based on Ray Nelsons 1963 short story Eight O’Clock in the Morning. ... Prince of Darkness (also known as John Carpenters Prince of Darkness) is a 1987 American horror film directed, written and scored by John Carpenter. ... Big Trouble in Little China (also known as John Carpenters Big Trouble in Little China) is a 1986 comedy/action film, directed by John Carpenter and starring Kurt Russell and Kim Cattrall, set in San Franciscos Chinatown. ... Starman (1984; see also 1984 in film) is a science fiction film directed by John Carpenter which tells the story of an alien from another planet (Jeff Bridges) who has come to Earth in response to the invitation left of the gold phonograph record on the Voyager space probes. ... Christine (also known as John Carpenters Christine) is a horror film about a supernaturally malevolent automobile and its effects on the teenager who owns it, adapted from a novel written by Stephen King. ... This article is about the 1982 remake of The Thing from Another World. ... Escape from New York is a 1981 science fiction/action film directed and scored by John Carpenter. ... The Fog is a 1980 horror movie directed by John Carpenter, who also wrote the screenplay and composed the music of the film. ... Halloween (film) redirects here. ... Assault on Precinct 13 is a 1976 action / thriller movie, directed by John Carpenter. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long. ...

Interviews

Further reading

References

  1. ^ John Carpenter Biography (1948-)
  2. ^ a b (1992) "Carpenter, John Howard", in Kleber, John E.: The Kentucky Encyclopedia, Associate editors: Thomas D. Clark, Lowell H. Harrison, and James C. Klotter, Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0813117720. 
  3. ^ Marco Lanzagorta, "John Carpenter" at Senses of Cinema.
  4. ^ John Carpenter's profile at AMCtv.
  5. ^ The Official John Carpenter, London Times: March 8, 1978. The slow evolution of Dark Star.
  6. ^ SoundtrackNet article, "Having a Bite with John Carpenter": October 14, 1998
  7. ^ IMDb.com Business Data for Assault on Precinct 13 (1976)
  8. ^ Q & A session with John Carpenter and Austin Stoker at American Cinematheque's 2002 John Carpenter retrospective, in the Assault on Precinct 13 2003 special edition DVD.
  9. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000118/
  10. ^ Scifi.com, Interview: John Carpenter looks back at Halloween on its 25th anniversary
  11. ^ The Official John Carpenter, Rolling Stone: June 28, 1979
  12. ^ Audio commentary by John Carpenter and Debra Hill in The Fog, 2002 special edition DVD
  13. ^ House of Horrors Review: Halloween
  14. ^ The Official John Carpenter, Chic Magazine: August 1979, Dr. Terror stalks Hollywood
  15. ^ Scifil.com Interview
  16. ^ Killing His Contemporaries: Dissecting The Musical Worlds Of John Carpenter
  17. ^ Interview with John Carpenter in the 2005 documentary film, Tales from the Crypt from Comic Books to Television.
  18. ^ Audio commentary by John Carpenter and Debra Hill in The Fog, 2002 special edition DVD.
  19. ^ IMDb.com Business Data for The Fog (1980)
  20. ^ Audio commentary by John Carpenter and Debra Hill in The Fog, 2002 special edition DVD.
  21. ^ IMDb.com Business Data for The Thing (1982)
  22. ^ Interview with John Carpenter on the DVD documentary film "Christine: Ignition"
  23. ^ IMDB: Business Data for Starman
  24. ^ Boston Globe December 9, 1984. Director John Carpenter talks about the movie biz big budgets and cold burgers
  25. ^ The Official John Carpenter: Los Angeles Herald Examiner: December 14, 1984
  26. ^ John Carpenter, Staci Layne Wilson interview, quoted at Horror.com.
  27. ^ Press Release for films inducted into National Film Registry on Dec. 27, 2006. National Film Registry 2006
  28. ^ Interviews with Debra Hill and Jamie Lee Curtis in the 2002 documentary film, John Carpenter: The Man and His Movies.
  29. ^ Sandy King's profile at the Internet Movie Database.

Thomas Dionysius Clark (July 14, 1903 - June 28, 2005) was perhaps Kentuckys most notable historian. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Carpenter Biography (2865 words)
John Carpenter was born on January 16th 1948 in Carthage, NY and spent his formative years being raised in Bowling Green, Kentucky, which he regards as his home town.
John Carpenters next project as a director was Christine (1983), the Stephen King novel about a possessed car, teenage angst and rock'n'roll.
Carpenter is a consistently successful director, while some of his films are more well received than others, none of his films have ever lost money for the studio (a pretty big achievement).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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