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Encyclopedia > John C. Stennis
John Cornelius Stennis


In office
November 17, 1947January 3, 1989
Preceded by Theodore Bilbo
Succeeded by C. Trent Lott

Born August 3, 1901
Kemper County, Mississippi
Died April 23, 1995
Jackson, Mississippi
Nationality american
Political party Democrat
Spouse Coy Hines
Religion Methodist

John Cornelius Stennis (August 3, 1901April 23, 1995) was a U.S. Senator from the state of Mississippi. He was a Democrat. See http://bioguide. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (October 13, 1877–August 21, 1947) was an American politician. ... Chester Trent Lott, Sr. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Kemper County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: Coordinates: Country United States State Mississippi County Hinds Founded 1822 Government  - Mayor Frank Melton Area  - City  106. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Democratic Party, founded in 1792, is the second-oldest political party in the world (after the Tories of the United Kingdom). ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... August 3 is the 215th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (216th in leap years), with 150 days remaining. ... 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (114th in leap years). ... 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Senate composition following 2006 elections The United States Senate is... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ...

Contents

Early life

Born in Kemper County, Mississippi, Stennis received a bachelor's degree from Mississippi State University in Starkville (then Mississippi A&M) in 1923. In 1928, Stennis obtained a law degree from the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Alpha Chi Rho. While in law school, he won a seat in the Mississippi House of Representatives, in which he served until 1932. Stennis was a prosecutor from 1932-1937 and a circuit judge from 1937-1947, both for Mississippi's Sixteenth Judicial District. Kemper County is a county located in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... A bachelors degree (Artium Baccalaureus, A.B. or B.A.) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles northeast of Jackson and 23 miles west of Columbus. ... Starkville is a city in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, United States. ... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Nickname: C-Ville Location in the Commonwealth of Virginia Coordinates: Country United States State Virginia County Albemarle County Founded 1762  - Mayor David E. Brown Area    - City 26. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Alpha Chi Rho (ΑΧΡ) is a mens collegiate fraternity founded on June 4th, 1895 at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut by the Reverend Paul Ziegler, his son Carl Ziegler, and Carls friends William Rouse, Herbert T. Sherriff and William A.D. Eardeley. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... The Mississippi House of Representatives , in American politics, is the lower house of the state legislature of Mississippi. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will take you to a full 1932 calendar). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ...


U.S. Senator

Upon the death of Senator Theodore Bilbo in 1947, Stennis won the special election to fill the vacancy, winning the seat from a field of five candidates (including two sitting Congressmen: John E. Rankin and William M. Colmer). He remained in the Senate until 1989. From 1947 to 1978, he served alongside fellow Democrat James Eastland. They were the second-longest serving Senate duo in American history, behind only Strom Thurmond and Fritz Hollings of South Carolina. Theodore Gilmore Bilbo (October 13, 1877–August 21, 1947) was an American politician. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... John Elliott Rankin (March 29, 1882 - November 26, 1960) was a politician from the U.S. State of Mississippi. ... William Meyers Colmer (February 11, 1890 - September 9, 1980) was a Mississippi politician. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Ernest Frederick Fritz Hollings (born January 1, 1922) was a Democratic United States Senator from South Carolina from 1966 to January 3, 2005. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N...


Stennis wrote the first Senate ethics code, and was the first chairman of the Senate Ethics Committee. The U.S. Senate Select Committee on Ethics is a select committee of the United States Senate charged with dealing with matters related to senatorial ethics. ...


In 1973, Stennis was almost fatally wounded by two gunshots after being mugged outside his Washington home. In October 1973, during the Watergate scandal, the Nixon administration proposed the Stennis compromise, wherein the hard-of-hearing Stennis would listen to the contested Oval Office tapes and report on their contents[citation needed], but this plan went nowhere. The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994) was the thirty-sixth (1953–1961) Vice President, and the thirty-seventh (1969–1974) President of the United States. ... The Stennis Compromise was a legal maneuver attempted by U.S. President Richard Nixon during the Watergate scandal on October 19, 1973. ... The Oval Office from above The Oval Office is the official office of the President of the United States. ...


Stennis lost his left leg to cancer in 1984. Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


He was unanimously selected President Pro Tempore of the Senate during the 100th Congress (1987-1989). During his Senate career he chaired, at various times, the Select Committee on Standards and Conduct, the Armed Services committee, and the Appropriations committee. Because of his work with the Armed Services committee (1969-1980) he became known as the "Father of America's Modern Navy." Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... // Dates of Sessions January 3, 1987 to March 3, 1989 Major political events Bicentennial of the United States Constitution Major legislation Main article: List of United States federal legislation#100th United States Congress 1987 - Surface Transportation and Uniform Relocation Assistance Act, PL 100-17 1987 - McKinney-Vento Act, PL 100... The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Navy, also known as the USN or the U.S. Navy, is a branch of the United States armed forces responsible for conducting naval operations. ...

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 2255 KB) Photo by Mark Putnam File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 2255 KB) Photo by Mark Putnam File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... USS (CVN-74) is a nuclear-powered supercarrier in the United States Navy named for a Senator from Mississippi. ...

Civil rights record

Stennis' record on civil rights was mixed throughout his long career. As a prosecutor, he sought the conviction and execution of three black men whose murder confessions had been extracted by torture. The convictions were overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court in the landmark case of Brown v. Mississippi (1936) that banned the use of evidence obtained by torture. The transcript of the trial indicates Stennis was fully aware of the methods of interrogation, including flogging, used to gain confessions. Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Torture is defined by the United Nations Convention Against Torture as any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Brown v. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ...


In the 1950s and 1960s he vigorously opposed such legislation as the Voting Rights Act, as did most of the Southern senators. He also signed the Southern Manifesto of 1954. He openly supported Barry Goldwater's presidential bid in 1964, as did most of the state's prominent Democrats. This does not cite any references or sources. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The National Voting Rights Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. Â§ 1973-1973aa-6)[1] outlawed the requirement that would-be voters in the United States take literacy tests to qualify to register to vote, and it provided for federal registration of voters in areas that had less than 50... The Southern Manifesto was a document written in 1956 by legislators in the United States Congress opposed to racial integration in public places. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ...


However, by the 1980s he regularly supported legislation to extend the civil rights of women and minorities, though he opposed the Martin Luther King holiday. He also campaigned (along with Governor Bill Allain) for Mike Espy in 1986 during Espy's successful bid to become the first black Congressman from the state since the end of Reconstruction. The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ... Governors of Mississippi Territory, 1801–1817 Winthorp Sargent (Federalist) (7 May 1798–25 May 1801) William C. C. Claiborne (Democrat) (25 May 1801–1 March 1805) Robert Williams (Democrat) (1 March 1805–7 March 1809) David Holmes (Democrat) (7 March 1809–10 December 1817) Governors... William A. Bill Allain (born February 14, 1928) is a Mississippi politician who served as governor of that state as a Democrat from 1984 to 1988. ... Alphonso Michael Espy, usually called Mike Espy, (born November 30, 1953) was a U.S. political figure. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Reconstruction was the attempt from 1865 to 1877 in U.S. history to resolve the issues of the American Civil War, when both the Confederacy and slavery were destroyed. ...


Earlier in his career, Stennis had been the first Democrat to publicly criticize Joseph McCarthy on the Senate floor during the Red Scare, while Eastland supported McCarthy to the end. On balance, he was far more supportive of civil rights than Eastland, who was well known for his open racism. Even in the early part of his career, he was never as virulently racist as Eastland (or his predecessor, Bilbo). In some ways, Stennis' record on civil rights is similar to those of Goldwater, Robert Byrd, Sam Ervin and J. William Fulbright — all of whom opposed many federal civil rights bills not out of racism, but because they felt the bills gave the federal government too much power over the states. Still, Stennis shied away from supporting civil rights legislation when there was no political risk in doing so. Joseph Raymond McCarthy (November 14, 1908 – May 2, 1957) was a Republican U.S. Senator from the state of Wisconsin between 1947 and 1957. ... A 1947 comic book published by the Catechetical Guild Educational Society warning of the dangers of a Communist takeover. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Armenian Genocide · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Blood libel · Black Legend Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Ku Klux Klan National Party (South Africa) American Nazi Party Kahanism · Supremacism Anti... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Samuel James Ervin Jr. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905–February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ...


Retirement

Declining to run for re-election in 1988, Stennis retired from the Senate in 1989 at the height of his popularity. He never lost an election in 60 years as an elected official. He took a teaching post at his alma mater, which he held until his death in Jackson at the age of 93. Nickname: Coordinates: Country United States State Mississippi County Hinds Founded 1822 Government  - Mayor Frank Melton Area  - City  106. ...


In his last election in 1982, Stennis easily defeated Republican Haley Barbour in a largely Democratic year. In 2003, however, Barbour was elected as Mississippi's second Republican governor since Reconstruction. The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Haley Reeves Barbour (born October 22, 1947) is the current governor of Mississippi, and a Republican. ... Reconstruction was the attempt from 1865 to 1877 in U.S. history to resolve the issues of the American Civil War, when both the Confederacy and slavery were destroyed. ...


At the time of Stennis' retirement, his continuous tenure of 41 years and 2 months in the Senate was second only to that of Carl Hayden. (It has since been surpassed by Robert Byrd, Strom Thurmond, Ted Kennedy, and Daniel Inouye, leaving Stennis sixth). Carl Trumbull Hayden (October 2, 1877_January 25, 1972) was the first United States Senator to serve seven terms, and holds the record for combined service in both houses of the United States Congress - he served continuously from February 19, 1912 to January 2, 1969. ... Robert Carlyle Byrd (born November 20, 1917) is the senior United States Senator from West Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Daniel Ken Inouye (born September 7, 1924) is a recipient of the Medal of Honor and currently serves as the senior United States Senator from Hawaiʻi. ...


John Stennis is buried at Pinecrest Cemetery in Kemper County. He and his wife, the former Coy Hines, had two children, John Hampton and Margaret Jane.


Naming Honors

The John C. Stennis Space Center (or SSC), located in Hancock County, Mississippi at the Mississippi/Louisiana border, is NASAs largest rocket engine test facility. ... Student Congress (also known as Congressional Debate) is a form of high school debate in the United States. ... The National Forensic League is one of two major U.S. national organizations which direct high school competitive speech events. ... The John C. Stennis Lock and Dam (formerly named Columbus Lock and Dam) is part of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway. ... USS (CVN-74) is the seventh Nimitz-class nuclear-powered supercarrier in the United States Navy, named for Senator John C. Stennis of Mississippi. ... Four aircraft carriers, (bottom-to-top) Principe de Asturias, amphibious assault carrier USS Wasp, supercarrier USS Forrestal and light V/STOL carrier HMS Invincible, showing size differences of late 20th century carriers An aircraft carrier is a warship designed to deploy and recover aircraft — in effect acting as a sea... A Carrier Strike Group (CSG) is the United States Navy term that replaces Carrier Battle Group. ...

Trivia

Because of James Eastland's length of service, Senator Stennis spent 35 years as the junior Senator from Mississippi, despite having seniority over the vast majority of his peers. Together, they held a record for the longest-serving Senate duo from the same state. This record was eventually broken by Strom Thurmond and Ernest Hollings. Unlike Senator Hollings, Stennis went on to eventually succeed his Senior senator as President pro tempore of the Senate. James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ... Ernest Frederick Fritz Hollings (born January 1, 1922) was a Democratic United States Senator from South Carolina from 1966 to January 3, 2005. ...


Quote

"I want to plow a straight furrow right down to the end of the row."


References

  • Stennis Center for Public Service. "Tribute to John C. Stennis". Retrieved June 16, 2005.

June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Preceded by
Theodore Bilbo
United States Senator (Class 1) from Mississippi
1947–1989
Served alongside: James Eastland, Thad Cochran
Succeeded by
Trent Lott
Preceded by
Richard B. Russell, Jr.
Chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services
1969–1981
Succeeded by
John Tower
Preceded by
Warren G. Magnuson
Dean of the United States Senate
January 3, 1981January 3, 1989
Succeeded by
Strom Thurmond
Preceded by
Strom Thurmond
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
1987–1989
Succeeded by
Robert C. Byrd

 
 

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