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Encyclopedia > John Byrne
John Byrne

At the 1992 San Diego Comic Book Expo.
Photo by Corey Bond.
Birth name John Lindley Byrne
Born July 6, 1950 (1950-07-06) (age 57)
Walsall, England
Nationality Naturalised American
(immigrated British, Canadian)
Area(s) Penciller, Inker, Writer
Notable works Next Men
X-Men
Fantastic Four
Superman

John Lindley Byrne (born July 6, 1950) is a British-born Canadian-American author and artist of comic books. Since the mid-1970s Byrne has worked on nearly every major American superhero. His best-known work has been on Marvel ComicsX-Men and Fantastic Four and the 1986 relaunch of DC ComicsSuperman franchise. During the 1990s he produced a number of creator-owned works including Next Men and Danger Unlimited. He is sometimes considered a controversial figure due to opinions he has expressed regarding his experiences within the comic industry. There are a number of people named John Byrne: John Byrne (1950-), British-American comic book artist John Byrne (VC), Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross John Byrne (Scottish artist) (1940-) John Byrne (Irish artist) John Byrne (footballer) John Byrne (judge), Fijian High Court and Supreme Court judge. ... Image File history File links John_Byrne. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Walsall is a large industrial town in the West Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Main articles: History of Canada, Timeline of Canadian history Canada has been inhabited by aboriginal peoples (known in Canada as First Nations) for at least 40,000 years. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... This article is about the comic book company. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Creator ownership is an arrangement in which the creator or creators of a work of fiction retain full ownership of the material, regardless of whether it is self-published or by a corporate publisher. ... John Byrnes Next Men (also simply Next Men or JBNM) is a comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne. ... Cover to Danger Unlimited #1. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

Dark Phoenix trade paperback. Cover art, from The Uncanny X-Men #135 (July 1980), by Byrne & Terry Austin.

Byrne was born in West Bromwich, Staffordshire, England where along with his parents (Frank and Nelsie) he lived with his maternal grandmother.[1] While living there, he was first exposed to the American superheroes that would dominate his professional life through reruns of American programs such as The Adventures of Superman. In Britain, he was able to read domestic comics such as Eagle as well as reprints of DC Comics.[2] When he was eight years old he left England with his parents and moved to Canada. According to Byrne himself, he was not an academically gifted student. Download high resolution version (474x749, 108 KB) This image is a book cover. ... Download high resolution version (474x749, 108 KB) This image is a book cover. ... The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... Terry Austin is an American comic book artist, working primarily as an inker. ... The Public by Will Alsop. ... Staffordshire (abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands region of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... This article is about the television series. ... From masthead for Eagle comic, logo by Berthold Wolpe, 1953 The Eagle was a British weekly comic, which ran in two main incarnations over the period of 1950 to 1994 (with accompanying annuals). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


Later he was married to photographer and actress Andrea Braun Byrne for 15 years.


His first encounter with Marvel Comics was in 1962 with Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s Fantastic Four #5. He later commented that "the book had an 'edge' like nothing DC was putting out at the time".[3] Jack Kirby’s work in particular had a strong influence on Byrne and he has worked with many of the characters Kirby created or co-created. Besides Kirby, Byrne was also influenced by the naturalistic style of Neal Adams. This article is about the comic book company. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... This article is about the superheroes. ... Naturalism in art refers to the depiction of realistic objects in a natural setting. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ...


In 1970, Byrne enrolled at the Alberta College of Art and Design in Calgary. He created the superhero parody Gay Guy for the college newspaper, which poked fun at the campus stereotype of homosexuality among art students. Gay Guy is also notable for featuring a prototype of the Alpha Flight character Snowbird. While there, he also published his first comic book, ACA Comix #1, featuring "The Death’s Head Knight".[4] The Alberta College of Art & Design is located in Calgary on the North Hill overlooking the Bow River and the downtown skyline, in a 245,000 square foot (23,000 m²) building that was designed in 1973 specifically as an art college. ... This article is about the Canadian city. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... Snowbird is a fictional character who appeared in Marvel Comics series Alpha Flight. ...


Byrne left the college in 1973 without graduating. He broke into comics illustrating a two-page story by writer Al Hewetson for Skywald Publications’ black-and-white horror magazine Nightmare #20 (August 1974). He then began freelancing for Charlton Comics, making his color-comics debut with the E-Man backup feature “Rog-2000,” starring a robot character he’d created in the mid-1970s that colleagues Roger Stern and Bob Layton named and began using for spot illustrations in their fanzine CPL (Contemporary Pictorial Literature). A Rog-2000 story written by Stern, with art by Byrne and Layton, had gotten the attention of Charlton Comics editor Nicola Cuti, who extended Byrne an invitation. Written by Cuti, "Rog-2000" became one of several alternating backup features in the Charlton Comics superhero series E-Man, starting with the eight-page "That Was No Lady" in issue #6 (Jan. 1975). Skywald Publications was a 1970s publisher of black-and-white comics magazines, primarily the horror anthologies Nightmare, Psycho and Scream, as well as a small line of comic books. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Big C logo, used from Sept. ... E-Man is a fictional comic book superhero created by writer Nicola Cuti and artist Joe Staton for Charlton Comics in 1973. ... Rog-2000 (pronounced Rahj-two-thousand, and sometimes spelled ROG 2000) is a fictional robot that was the first professional creation of comic book artist-writer John Byrne. ... The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... Bob Layton is a USA comic book artist. ... A fanzine (see also: zine) is a nonprofessional publication produced by fans of a particular cultural phenomenon (such as a literary or musical genre) for the pleasure of others who share their interest. ... Nick Cuti (born as Nicola Cuti on October 29, 1944) is a comic writer, known for his creation of E-Man as well as other contributions to the comics industry. ... For other uses, see Superhero (disambiguation). ... E-Man is a fictional comic book superhero created by writer Nicola Cuti and artist Joe Staton for Charlton Comics in 1973. ...


Byrne went on to work on the Charlton books Wheelie and the Chopper Bunch, Space: 1999, and Emergency!, and co-created with writer Joe Gill the post-apocalyptic science-fiction series Doomsday + 1. Byrne additionally drew a cover for the supernatural anthology The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves #54 (Dec. 1975). Wheelie and the Chopper Bunch was a Hanna-Barbera cartoon which aired on NBC for one season, from September 7, 1974 to August 30, 1975. ... Left to right: Barbara Bain, Catherine Schell and Martin Landau from Space:1999s second season. ... Emergency! was a popular crime drama/medical television series that was produced by Mark VII Limited (Jack Webbs company) and distributed by Universal Studios. ... Joe Gill was a writer who worked in the comics industry. ... Apocalyptic science fiction is a sub-genre of science fiction that is concerned with the end of the world or civilization, through nuclear war, plague, or some other general disaster. ... For the song from The Rocky Horror Show, see Science Fiction/Double Feature. ... Doomsday + 1 was an American post-apocalyptic comic-book series published by Charlton Comics in the 1970s. ... For other uses, see Supernatural (disambiguation). ... ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm released on March 6, 2001 in the USA and March 19, 2001 in the UK. // Their first single, Smooth Criminal, was a cover of Michael Jacksons song Smooth Criminal, which started to bring popularity to the band. ... The Many Ghosts of Doctor Graves #1 (May 1967). ...


Marvel Comics

Byrne’s first story for Marvel Comics was "Dark Asylum" (written by David Anthony Kraft), published in Giant-Size Dracula #5 (June 1975). He began drawing Marvel’s lower-selling titles, including Iron Fist, The Champions, and Marvel Team-Up. For many issues, he was paired with writer Chris Claremont. This article is about the comic book company. ... David Anthony Kraft is a comic book writer. ... Dracula is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe. ... Iron Fist (Daniel Rand) is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a practitioner of martial arts. ... The Champions (of Los Angeles) are a short-lived superhero team from the mid-1970s, published by Marvel Comics. ... Marvel Team-Up is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The Uncanny X-Men

Byrne joined Claremont beginning with The X-Men #108 (Dec. 1977). Their work together would make them both fan favorites and X-Men became one of the industry’s best-selling titles. Byrne has repeatedly compared his working relationship with Claremont to Gilbert and Sullivan, and has said that they were "almost constantly at war over who the characters were".[5] Byrne became "increasingly unhappy"[citation needed] and left the title with issue #143. The X-Men are a group of comic book superheroes featured in Marvel Comics. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ...


Captain America

In the early 1980s, Byrne worked on a number of other Marvel books. His nine-issue run (#247–255) with writer Roger Stern on Captain America included an issue (#250) in which the Captain was nominated for the US presidency. The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... This article is about the original comic book character named Captain America. ...


Alpha Flight

Marvel persuaded Byrne to write and draw Alpha Flight, a Canadian superhero team who were first introduced “merely to survive a fight with the X-Men.”[3] The book was popular (its first issue sold 500,000 copies[6], but Byrne has said the book "was never much fun", and that he considered the characters two-dimensional.[3] One of those characters, Northstar, became Marvel's first openly gay superhero. Though intended by Byrne to be gay from the beginning,[citation needed] his homosexuality was only hinted at during Byrne's tenure on the book. Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... The fictional character Northstar (born Jean-Paul Beaubier, formerly Jean-Paul Martin) is a Marvel Comics superhero, a member of Alpha Flight and the X-Men. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ...


The Incredible Hulk

After issue #28 of Alpha Flight, Byrne swapped books with Bill Mantlo, writer of The Incredible Hulk. According to Byrne, he discussed his ideas with editor-in-chief Jim Shooter ahead of time, but once Byrne was on the book, Shooter objected to them.[3] Byrne only wrote and drew six issues (#314–319) of The Incredible Hulk. Bill Mantlo (born November 9,[1] 1951) is an American comic-book writer, primarily at Marvel Comics, and an attorney, best-known for his work on two licensed toy properties whose adventures occurred in the Marvel Universe: the Eagle Award-winning Micronauts and the long-running Rom. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The Fantastic Four

Byrne’s most important post-X-Men body of work at Marvel was his six-year run on The Fantastic Four (#232-293), considered by many to be a "second Golden Age"[7] on that title. Byrne said his goal was to "turn the clock back . . . get back and see fresh what it was that made the book great at its inception".[8] However, he also made a number of significant changes to the title: the Thing was replaced as a member of the quartet by the She-Hulk, while the Thing had adventures in his own comic (also written by Byrne), and his longtime girlfriend Alicia Masters left him for his teammate the Human Torch; the Invisible Girl was developed into the most powerful member with her heightened control of her refined powers and the self-confident assertiveness to use it epitomized by her name change to the Invisible Woman; and the Baxter Building, their headquarters, was destroyed and replaced with Four Freedoms Plaza. Byrne has cited multiple reasons for leaving the book, including “internal office politics”[3] and that "it simply started to get old".[9] The Fantastic Four is Marvel Comics flagship superhero team, created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and debuting in The Fantastic Four #1 (Nov. ... thing, see Thing (disambiguation). ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The Thing and Alicia Masters. ... This article is about the Silver/Modern Age Human Torch, Johnny Storm. ... Invisible Girl redirects here. ... The Baxter Building is a fictitious Manhattan 35-story office building whose five upper floors house the Fantastic Fours headquarters in the Marvel Universe. ... We dont have an article called Four Freedoms Plaza Start this article Search for Four Freedoms Plaza in. ...


Superman

Near the end of his time at Marvel he was hired by DC Comics to revamp its flagship character Superman. This was part of a company-wide restructuring of the history of the DC Universe and all of its characters following the miniseries Crisis on Infinite Earths. Byrne’s reworking of Superman in particular gained widespread media coverage outside the comic book industry, including articles in Time and The New York Times. Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue American comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 to simplify their then-55-year-old continuity. ... TIME redirects here. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...

The Man of Steel #1, July 1986.
The Man of Steel #1, July 1986.

At the time, Byrne said, "I’m taking Superman back to the basics ... It's basically Siegel and Shuster's Superman meets the Fleischer Superman in 1986.”[10] Byrne significantly reduced Superman’s powers (though he was still one of the most powerful beings on Earth), eliminated the Fortress of Solitude, Krypto, and had his foster parents the Kents still alive while Superman was an adult to enjoy their adopted son’s triumphs as well as to provide him with support, grounding, and advice whenever he needed it. Image File history File links Mansteel1. ... Image File history File links Mansteel1. ... The Man of Steel was a six-issue comic book limited series released in 1986 by DC Comics, several months after the 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths completed. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Max Fleischer (July 19, 1883–September 11, 1972) was an important pioneer in the development of the animated cartoon. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ... Krypto, also known as Krypto the Superdog, is a fictional character; he is Supermans pet dog in the various Superman comic books published by DC Comics. ...


Byrne also did away with the character’s childhood/teenage career as Superboy; in Byrne’s revamped history, Clark Kent does not put on a costume and become a super-hero until he's an adult. Byrne has since admitted this was a mistake, since it completely gutted the basic premise of the Legion of Super-Heroes, a team of super-powered teenagers existing a thousand years in the future, who were inspired by Superboy. Superboy is a fictional superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... LSH redirects here. ...


In the Superman mythos, Byrne wrote Clark Kent as having a more aggressive and extroverted personality than previously depicted, even making him a top high-school football player. Byrne also did his part to come up with explanations for how Superman’s disguise works, such as the public simply does not realize that he has a secret identity since he is unmasked, that Superman would vibrate his face via his super speed in order to blur his image to photographers, and having Kent keep a weight training set around to explain how the human and presumably weaker Kent could have a frame as massive as Superman’s. Byrne’s Superman felt that his deepest roots were on Earth, and that his home planet of "Krypton is anathema to him".[10]


The new Superman debuted in the six-issue miniseries The Man of Steel, which described his origin and early career. Byrne wrote and drew two monthly Superman titles with the hero’s present-day adventures: a new Superman title beginning with issue #1 (January 1987) and Action Comics, in which, beginning with issue #584, Superman teamed up with another hero or group. The original Superman book was renamed Adventures of Superman starting with issue #424 and was initially written by Marv Wolfman and drawn by Jerry Ordway, but the writing chores were taken over by Byrne after a year (from issues #436–442, and 444). As 1988 marked the 50th anniversary year of Superman’s creation, Byrne managed to do more Superman-related projects while working on the core Superman monthly titles at the same time: he wrote the prestige format graphic novel, Superman: The Earth Stealers, while also writing three separate four-issue mini-series: The World of Krypton, The World of Metropolis, and The World of Smallville. He also supplied the cover art for a Time magazine cover and interior spread which featured Superman, where his pencils were inked by Jerry Ordway. Around this time while working on the Superman titles, Byrne also penciled the 6-issue DC Universe crossover mini-series Legends in 1986-1987. The Man of Steel was a six-issue comic book limited series released in 1986 by DC Comics, several months after the 12-issue limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths completed. ... Superman began as a feature in Action Comics #1 in June 1938. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... The death of Superman and its aftermath ran through a number of issues of the Superman comics in 1992-93. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Prestige format is a term coined by DC Comics but now in wider use to refer to a square-bound comic book with cardstock covers. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... TIME redirects here. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Legends was a six issue comic book limited series published in 1986-1987 by DC Comics, which had plot threads running through several other DC comic titles, crossing over into them (each individual crossover/tie-in had a Legends Chapter # header on the cover). ...


Byrne spent about two years on the Superman titles before leaving. He cited the lack of "conscious support" for his work from DC Comics and the fact that the version of Superman that the company licensed for merchandise was different from his version in the comic books as the reasons for his dissatisfaction.[3]


Return to Marvel

In 1986, Marvel began publication of a new line of superhero titles created by then-Editor-in-Chief Jim Shooter, which took place in a continuum removed from the Marvel Universe proper, called the New Universe. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Promotional Advertisement for The New Universe, Marvel Comics Group, circa 1986. ...


The Star Brand

In 1987, the New Universe line saw a revamp under new Editor-in-Chief Tom DeFalco, and Byrne took over writing and art-breakdowns on the line's flagship title, Star Brand (renamed The Star Brand during Byrne’s term on the book). Byrne’s run started with issue #11 and continued until the series' cancellation eight issues later upon Marvel's discontinuation of the New Universe line. Tom DeFalco (born June 26, 1950) is an American comics writer and editor. ... The Star Brand is a fictional star-shaped tattoo-like mark that first appeared in the comic book series Star Brand, published by Marvel Comics under their New Universe imprint. ...


Avengers West Coast

In 1989, after leaving Superman, Byrne returned to work on a number of titles for Marvel Comics. His work on West Coast Avengers (issues 42–57, soon renamed Avengers West Coast) was contingent on his being allowed to do what he called “my Vision story.”[3] The Vision was a long standing Marvel superhero and member of The Avengers, an android originally created by the villain Ultron constructed with the body of the original Human Torch. The Vision went on to join the team, marry his teammate the Scarlet Witch, and father two children by her. Byrne radically changed this, revealing that Ultron lied about the Vision’s creation. The android Human Torch was found and joined the WCA. The Vision was disassembled and stripped of his emotions. The couple’s twins were revealed to be pieces of the soul of the demon Master Pandemonium. In addition to these changes, Byrne’s run is remembered for the introduction of the Great Lakes Avengers, an eclectic group of new superheroes. The West Coast Avengers was a spin-off superhero team of the Avengers, as well as the title of their comic book series. ... The Vision is the name of three fictional characters that appear in the Marvel Universe. ... The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... For other uses, see Android (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ultron (disambiguation). ... The Human Torch is a Marvel Comics-owned superhero. ... The Scarlet Witch (Wanda Maximoff) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe, a mutant who was introduced as a super-villainess before reforming and becoming a superheroine early in her history. ... Master Pandemonium is a supervillain in the Marvel Universe. ... The Great Lakes Avengers are a comedic superhero group, fashioned after Marvel Comics’ Avengers. ...


The Sensational She-Hulk

During She-Hulk’s tenure with the Fantastic Four, she appeared in Marvel Graphic Novel #18 in November 1985, titled The Sensational She-Hulk, which Byrne also wrote and illustrated.


On the request of editor Mark Gruenwald, Byrne wrote and drew a new series in 1989, The Sensational She-Hulk (maintaining the 1985 graphic novel’s title). Gruenwald directed that it be significantly different from the character’s 1970s series, The Savage She-Hulk.[11] Byrne’s take was comedic and the She-Hulk, who was aware she was in a comic book, regularly broke the fourth wall. Byrne left the book after writing and drawing the first eight issues. Byrne was asked for input on writer Dwayne McDuffie’s She-Hulk: Ceremony graphic novel, and according to Byrne, most of his objections to the story and notations of errors were ignored, and his editor, Bobbie Chase, “was rewriting my stuff to bring it into line with” the story in Ceremony. Upon complaining to DeFalco, Byrne says he was fired from his series.[11] He later returned to write and draw issues #31–50 under new editor Renée Witterstaetter. Mark Gruenwald (June 18, 1953-August 12, 1996) was an American comic book writer and editor. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters-Jameson) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Sue Walters-Jameson) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ...


Iron Man

Byrne took over writing Iron Man (#258–277), drawn by John Romita Jr. and later by Paul Ryan. Byrne launched a second “Armor Wars” story arc, restored the Mandarin as a major Iron Man nemesis, and featured the 1950s “pre-superhero Marvel” monster Fin Fang Foom. This article is about the superhero. ... John Romita, Jr. ... This article is about the superhero. ... The Mandarin is a fictional character, a Marvel Comics supervillain and the archenemy of Iron Man. ... Atlas Comics is the 1950s comic book publishing company that would evolve into Marvel Comics. ... Fin Fang Foom is a fictional character and an alien dragon that appears in the Marvel Universe. ...


Namor, the Sub-Mariner

Byrne also started a new series, Namor, the Sub-Mariner. Byrne’s take on the undersea antihero Namor cast him as the head of a surface company, Oracle, Inc., in order to help keep the ocean unpolluted, and had Namor involved in corporate intrigue. Byrne wrote and drew the book for 25 issues, until new artist Jae Lee inspired a sharp change in the series’ mood and plot of the book. Byrne wrote the book until #32. Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character featured in Marvel Comics, and one of the oldest superhero characters. ... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional comic-book character in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the first superheroes, debuting in Spring 1939. ... Cover art from Manhunter #4 (2005). ...


Creator-owned works

In the early 1990s, Byrne began creating a series of original, creator-owned works for publisher Dark Horse Comics. This was during a general trend in the industry for established creators working for Marvel and DC to bring their original works to other publishers or create their own companies to publish the works themselves (one prominent example is Image Comics). A number of these creators, including Byrne, Frank Miller, Mike Mignola, and Art Adams, banded together to form the Legend imprint at Dark Horse. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist and movie writer and director. ... Mike Mignola (born in Berkeley, California on September 16, 1960) is a American comic book artist and writer. ... Arthur (Art) Adams is a comic book creator, best known for the series Monkeyman and OBrien published by Dark Horse. ... A comic book imprint used in the early 1990s by artists such as Frank Miller and John Byrne. ...


Byrne’s first title for Dark Horse was Next Men, a work he considered darker and more realistic than his previous work. The Next Men were five young people who were the product of a secret government experiment. Byrne said, “I thought I would see what I could do with superheroes in the ‘real world’ ” and “[e]xplore the impact their existence would have.”[3] Byrne’s other Dark Horse titles were Babe (a kind of She-Hulk for mature readers) and Danger Unlimited, the latter about a Fantastic Four-like team of heroes in the future fighting an alien occupation of Earth. John Byrnes Next Men (also simply Next Men or JBNM) is a comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... Cover to Danger Unlimited #1. ...


The Next Men lasted until issue 30 in 1994, when Byrne ended the series, intending to return “in no more than six months.” However, Byrne says he “did not count on...the virtual collapse of the whole comic book industry, which seemed to occur at just the time I put Next Men on the shelf...In the present, very depressed marketplace, I don’t feel Next Men would have much chance, so I leave the book hibernating until such time as the market improves.”[3]


Later career

In later years, Byrne has done titles for Marvel, DC, and other publishers, including the 1992 prestige format graphic novel Green Lantern: Ganthet’s Tale with science fiction author Larry Niven at DC. He also returned to the X-Men franchise at Marvel from 1991-1992, succeeding longtime writer Chris Claremont, who left after 17 years working on the various X-Men related titles. Byrne's return as the new writer was brief, as he only wrote Uncanny X-Men # 281-285 and 288 with artist Whilce Portacio, and X-Men (vol. 2) # 4-5 with artist Jim Lee. Like Claremont before him, Byrne left writing the X-Men titles due to editorial differences with then X-Men editor at the time, Bob Harras. Prestige format is a term coined by DC Comics but now in wider use to refer to a square-bound comic book with cardstock covers. ... Trade paperback of Will Eisners A Contract with God (1978), often mistakenly cited as the first graphic novel. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the eponymous team and other X-Men comic books, see X-Men. ... Whilce Portacio was born in Sangley Point, Cavite City, Philippines on July 8, 1963. ... X-Men is a Marvel Comics series featuring the homonymous group of mutant superheroes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Robert Bob Harras was editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics from 1995 to 2000. ...


He also wrote and drew another of DC’s signature series, the long-running Wonder Woman title from 1995–1998. During that time he relegated the superheroine to the status of observer in a many issues, spotlighting supporting characters such as Queen Hippolyta in their own adventures. He additionally took over New Gods vol. 4 at the end of 1996, as writer-artist of issues #12–15, continuing with it as the series was rebooted with a new #1 as Jack Kirby’s Fourth World. That ran 20 issues from 1997–1998. Byrne also wrote a Wonder Woman prose novel, Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses (1997, Prima Lifestyles, ISBN 0-7615-0483-4). For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... For the Marvel Comics character, see: Hippolyta (Marvel Comics). ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... The New Gods #1 (February-March 1971) featuring Orion. ...


His late-1990s Marvel work has been controversial. In the series Spider-Man: Chapter One, Byrne sought to retell some of Spider-Man’s earliest adventures, changing some key aspects, and declaring[citation needed] that the new version had supplanted the original stories as official Spider-Man canon. In late 1998, Byrne also took over as writer of the flagship series, The Amazing Spider-Man, at the end of the series with issue #440, by which time Marvel had decided to relaunch the book. The "last" issue of Amazing Spider-Man was #441 (Nov. 1998), with Marvel initiating The Amazing Spider-Man with a new issue #1 (Jan. 1999) with Howard Mackie as writer and Byrne as penciler. Byrne penciled issues #1–18 (from 1999–2000) and wrote #13–14. Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... Howard Mackie (born January 22 1958) is an American comic book editor and writer. ...


Marvel hired Byrne in 1999 for a second volume of the series featuring The Incredible Hulk, re-titled Hulk, with Ron Garney penciling. Byrne wrote of his plans for the first year, but as with his previous tenure on the character back in 1986, creative differences led to his departure before the year was over. Byrne wrote the first seven issues, as well as that series’ summer annual. The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Ron Garney is a comic book artist. ... An annual publication, more often called simply an annual, is a book or a magazine, comic book or comic strip published yearly. ...



From 1999–2001, Byrne returned to the X-Men once again, as he wrote and drew the flashback series X-Men: The Hidden Years. The series lasted 22 issues. Despite relatively low sales, Byrne maintained the comic was still profitable and believed the cancellation to be unexplained. This disagreement factored in his decision to no longer work for Marvel Comics.[12] In literature, film, television and other media, a flashback (also called analepsis) is an interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached. ... X-Men: The Hidden Years is a comic book series in the Marvel Comics universe starring the companys popular superhero team the X-Men. ...


Post-2000 works have involved characters and events in time periods mostly skipped over by other comics (Marvel: The Lost Generation), or alternate timelines (DC’s Superman & Batman: Generations); a common feature is to have characters who actually age during the course of the series, which is uncommon for characters in ongoing comics. His 2000s work has all been for DC Comics: JLA (#94–99, the “Tenth Circle” story arc), Doom Patrol, Blood of the Demon, and a brief return stint drawing Superman (with writer Gail Simone) in Action Comics #827–835. Afterward, Simone and Byrne reteamed to launch The All-New Atom series in 2006, with Byrne pencilling the first three issues. For publisher, IDW Byrne worked on the final issue of the miniseries Star Trek: Alien Spotlight (Feb. 2008); on the series FX, written by Wayne Osborne, starting with the March 2008 issue; and Star Trek: Assignment Earth. For DC, he drew a five-issue arc of JLA Classified.[issue # needed] Superman & Batman: Generations is an Elseworlds comic book series written and illustrated by John Byrne. ... This article is about the decade of 2000-2009. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Gail Simone at the 2002 SDCC. Photo copyright 2002-2005 Lea Hernandez Gail Simone is a popular American writer of comic books. ... The Atom is a fictional comic book superhero published by DC Comics. ... Assignment: Earth is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ...


In early 2003, Byrne spent ten weeks as guest penciler on the syndicated newspaper strip Funky Winkerbean. Byrne did this as a favor for Winkerbean’s creator, Tom Batiuk, who was recovering from foot surgery.[13][14] This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Funky Winkerbean is a comic strip created by high school teacher Tom Batiuk (pronounced BAT-ick), which debuted on March 26, 1972. ... Tom Batiuk (born 1947 in Akron, Ohio) is an American comic strip creator. ...


Controversies

Over the years, Byrne has gained a reputation as a controversial figure, and has noted this himself, stating that “as the people who have figured me out have said, I just don’t suffer fools gladly.”[15] Gail Simone, who worked with Byrne on The All New Atom (2006), described Byrne as “very opinionated,” although she qualified her statement, noting Byrne’s talent and assessing his personality as integral to his abilities: “I think John Byrne is brilliant and his forceful personality is part of that.”[16] Byrne’s opinions can lead to disputes, and commentators have noted disputes with Peter David,[17] Jim Shooter, Joe Quesada, Mark Evanier, Marv Wolfman,[18] and Erik Larsen.[18] In 1982, during a panel discussion at the Dallas Fantasy Fair, Byrne made unflattering comments about longtime comics writer and one-time Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Roy Thomas. After a transcript of the panel was published in The Comics Journal #75 (Sept. 1982), Thomas threatened a libel suit if Byrne did not apologize. In a letter printed in The Comics Journal #82 (July 1983), Byrne retracted his statements, claiming he was only repeating information from Wolfman and Wein and wrote, “I acted only in the office of a parrot.”[19] Gail Simone at the 2002 SDCC. Photo copyright 2002-2005 Lea Hernandez Gail Simone is a popular American writer of comic books. ... Peter Allen David (often abbreviated PAD) (born September 23, 1956) is an American writer, best known for his work in comic books and Star Trek novels. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Joe Quesada (born December 1, 1962), is an American comic book editor, writer and artist. ... Mark Evanier (born March 2, 1952 in Santa Monica, California) is an American writer. ... Cover to Crisis on Infinite Earths #1, which was written by Wolfman. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... Roy Thomas (born November 22, 1940, Missouri, United States) is a comic book writer and editor, and Stan Lees first successor as editor-in-chief of Marvel Comics. ... The cover of TCJ #115 (April 1987) celebrated their court victory in defending a libel suit. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ...


In the 1980s, Steve Gerber and Jack Kirby lampooned him in Destroyer Duck, drawing him as a character called Cogburn, possessing a removable spine and existing only to serve as a cog in the mammoth corporation that owned him.[20] Erik Larsen created a villain in the 1990s for his Savage Dragon and Freak Force series, Johnny Redbeard/The Creator, who also parodies Byrne; a massive cranium with atrophied appendages, he can bestow superpowers indiscriminately.[21] However, Byrne is also regarded as an enthusiastic talker, and someone with a warm love of his chosen medium.[15] Tony Isabella has commented upon Byrne’s approachability when at comic conventions, describing him as “friendly, funny, and well-received by those who attended the show.”[22] The 1980s was the decade spanning from 1980 to 1989, also called The Eighties. The decade saw social, economic and general upheaval as wealth, production and western culture migrated to new industrializing economies. ... Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Destroyer Duck was an anthology comic book published by Eclipse Enterprises in 1982, as well as the title of its primary story, written by Steve Gerber and featuring artwork by Jack Kirby. ... Cover to The Savage Dragon (original miniseries) #1. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The Savage Dragon is an ongoing American comic book series created by Erik Larsen and published by Image Comics. ... Freak Force is the name of a fictional team of bounty hunters operating out of Chicago, Illinois in the Image Comics series Savage Dragon, all created by Erik Larsen, many during his adolescence they are made up of superfreaks (the collective name for the various types of Super-Powers) that... Tony Isabella (born December 22, 1951) is an American comic book writer and commentator, best known as the creator and writer of Black Lightning, DC Comics first major African American superhero. ...


The magazine Heroplay examined Byrne’s alleged treatment of women in his comics and concluded, “As dynamic as his art can be, and as ambitious as his storylines are, he just seems to have an axe to grind with the female of the species,” and that he made women “either bitchy, flighty, or evil.”[23]


Despite the subject matter of which he writes and draws, in real life he is a firm skeptic. In a letter to the editor in the May/June 2008 issue of Skeptical Inquirer, he wrote: "I don't believe in the supernatural in any way."[24] The Skeptical Inquirer is a magazine of the Committee for the Scientific Investigation of Claims of the Paranormal (CSICOP) dedicated to debunking pseudoscience. ...


The “Byrne Curse”

Byrne has referenced his alleged tendency to “predict” real-life events with his comic books, calling it the “Byrne Curse.”[25] In a letter to Skeptic magazine, he noted a 1977 issue of Marvel Team-Up depicting a blackout in New York, with a real-life blackout occurring the month the issue went on sale, six months after he had drawn it; an issue of Uncanny X-Men depicting a major earthquake in Japan, which again occurred in real life the month the comic was released; and an issue of Wonder Woman in which the death of the superheroine, who is an Amazon princess named Diana, is presented on the cover as a newspaper front page with the headline “Princess Diana Dies.” The issue went on sale on a Wednesday, and Britain’s Diana, Princess of Wales was killed in an accident three days later.[26] The Skeptics Society is a nonprofit organization devoted to promoting scientific skepticism and resisting the spread of pseudoscience, superstition, and irrational beliefs. ... Marvel Team-Up is the name of several comic book series published by Marvel Comics. ... Tree limbs create a short circuit in electrical lines during a storm that spawned two tornados. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For the eponymous team and other X-Men comic books, see X-Men. ... This article is about the natural seismic phenomenon. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Amazons (in Greek, ) were a mythical ancient nation of all-female warriors. ... Diana, Princess of Wales (Diana Frances Mountbatten-Windsor, née Spencer) (1 July 1961–31 August 1997), commonly, but incorrectly, known as Princess Diana, was for fifteen years the wife of HRH The Prince Charles, Prince of Wales. ...


Art style

Cover for Blood of the Demon #1, series written and drawn by Byrne for DC Comics.
Cover for Blood of the Demon #1, series written and drawn by Byrne for DC Comics.

Byrne has stated his major influences on his art style are Jack Kirby, Gil Kane, Steve Ditko, Neal Adams, and Jean Giraud (best known as Moebius), as well as British comics artists Frank Hampson and Frank Bellamy and cartoonist Giles. He later described himself as “a Frank Miller sponge,” and told several interviewers of his desire to incorporate influences from Miller and Gene Colan into his style. Image File history File linksMetadata Blodemon_1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Blodemon_1. ... Jack Kirby (born Jacob Kurtzberg, August 28, 1917 – February 6, 1994) was one of the most influential, recognizable, and prolific artists in American comic books, and the co-creator of such enduring characters and popular culture icons as the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, the Hulk, Captain America, and hundreds... Showcase #22 (Oct. ... Stephen Ditko (born 2 November 1927) is a renowned American comic book artist and writer best known as the co-creator of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. ... Neal Adams (born June 6, 1941, Governors Island, Manhattan, New York City) is an American comic book and commercial artist best known for his highly naturalistic style of illustration. ... Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (born May 8, 1938) is a French comics artist. ... British comics is the art form of comics as practiced within the United Kingdom. ... A Frank Hampson & Don Harley panel from the 1959 : Dan Dare in Operation Moss Frank Hampson (1918 - 1985) is best known for being the creator of Dan Dare. ... Frank Bellamy (born 21 May 1917, died 5 July 1976) was a British comics artist, best known for his work on the Dan Dare strip, on which he replaced Frank Hampson. ... Ronald Carl Giles (September 29, 1916 – August 28, 1995), often referred to simply as Giles, was a cartoonist most famous for his work for the British newspaper the Daily Express. ... This article is about Frank Miller, the comic book writer and artist and movie writer and director. ... Gene Colan (born September 1, 1926, the Bronx, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist who sometimes worked under the name Adam Austin. ...


Byrne’s original work has been noted as being rough, with his drawings emphasizing curves over straight lines. Byrne has himself admitted to straight lines being “his least favorite artistic element.”[27]


Ron Goulart has called Byrne’s artwork “an eminently acceptable mix of bravura, complexity and storytelling clarity.”[28] Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ...


In Scott McCloud’s book Understanding Comics, Byrne is charted along with other comics artists in the “Big Triangle.”[29] McCloud’s placement of Byrne within it identifies his style as similar to Gilbert Hernandez and Jim Lee, making the point that Byrne’s line style is naturalistic without being overly detailed. Scott McCloud (born Scott McLeod on June 10, 1960) is an American cartoonist and a leading popular scholar of comics as a distinct literary and artistic medium. ... Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art is a 215-page non-fiction graphic novel by Scott McCloud, widely considered the definitive text to date on the theory of comics (or sequential art) as an artform and a communications medium. ... Gilbert Hernandez (born February 1, 1957), also known as Gilberto Hernandez (pronounced /heel-bear-toe/) or simply Beto (pronounced /beh-toe/), is along with his brothers Jaime and Mario a co-creator of the black and white independent comic Love and Rockets, published by Fantagraphics Books. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Byrne is, in 2006, an accomplished comic book creator, and is capable of producing virtually all aspects of a book, although he does still produce work in collaboration. The one exception is coloring, since Byrne is color-blind. He has problems distinguishing between some shades of green and brown and pencilled Iron Fist for a year believing the costume was brown. While he experimented with his own hand-developed lettering fonts in the early 1980s, he now utilizes a computer font based on the handwriting of the letterer Jack Morelli.[30] A colorist is an artist who colors comic art reading it for production as a comic book. ... Color blindness in humans is the inability to perceive differences between some or all colors that other people can distinguish. ... Iron Fist (Daniel Rand) is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe, and a practitioner of martial arts. ... In comic books, the letterer is the person who draws the letters in the word balloons, draws in sound effects and usually designs a books logo. ... In typography, a typeface is a co-ordinated set of character designs, which usually comprises an alphabet of letters, a set of numerals and a set of punctuation marks. ... Jack Morelli is a creator of comic books that includes the 1998 Spectacular Spider that was both written and lettered by Jack Morelli and colored by his wife Christie Scheele. ...


Byrne’s artistic style, his layouts and his storytelling have been sources of instruction and inspiration to many comics artists, including George Pérez,[31] Jim Lee,[32] Todd McFarlane,[33] Bryan Hitch,[34] and Marcos Martín.[35] New Teen Titans #1. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Todd McFarlane (born March 16, 1961 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is a Canadian comic book artist, writer, toy manufacturer/designer, and media entrepreneur who is best known as the creator of the epic religious fantasy series Spawn. ... The various characters of the Ultimate Marvel Universe, as seen on the cover to Ultimates (v2) #12. ...


As Byrne’s style has evolved over the years fan opinion has differed, a fact Byrne addressed in one of his “IMO” opinion columns.[36]


Awards

Byrne received the Squiddy Award for Favorite Penciller in 1993. The Squiddy Awards, also known as The Squiddies are the annual awards given by the participants in the Usenet newsgroup rec. ...


Byrne received a 1980 Inkpot Award. The Inkpot Award, bestowed annually since 1974 by Comic-Con International, is given to professionals in comic book, comic strip, animation, science fiction, and related pop-culture fields, who are guests of that organizations yearly multigenre fan convention, commonly known as Comic-Con or the San Diego Comic-Con. ...


Selected bibliography

A complete bibliography of Byrne’s comics work is maintained at the Byrne Robotics Checklist.


Marvel Comics

  • Alpha Flight vol. 1 (Writer/Penciller) #1-28
  • Avengers (Penciller) #164-166, 181-191 Annual #14, 18; (Writer) #305-317
  • Avengers West Coast (Writer/Penciller) #42-57, Annual #4
  • Captain America (Penciller) #247-255
  • The Champions (Penciller) #11-15, 17
  • Daredevil (Penciller) #138
  • Fantastic Four (Writer/Artist) #209-221, 232-293
  • Iron Man (Penciller) #118; (writer) #258-277; Annual #10 (artist)
  • The Incredible Hulk (writer/artist) #314-319
  • Hulk (writer) #1-7; Annual 1
  • Marvel: The Lost Generation (Writer/Artist) #1-12
  • Namor the Sub-Mariner (Writer/Artist) #1-25; (Writer) #26-32
  • The Sensational She-Hulk (Writer/Artist) #1-8, 31-50
  • Spider-Man: Chapter One (Writer/Artist) #1-12
  • The Amazing Spider-Man vol. 1 (Penciler) #189, 190, 206; (Writer) 440-441
  • The Amazing Spider-Man vol. 2 (Penciler) #1-18; (writer) 13, 14
  • Uncanny X-Men (co-plotter and Penciller), #108, 109, 111-143;(Scripter) #273, 281-285, 288
  • X-Men (vol. 2) (writer) #4-5
  • X-Men: The Hidden Years #1-22 (writer/artist)

Alpha Flight is a Marvel Comics superhero team, noteworthy for being one of the few Canadian superhero teams. ... The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Cover to Avengers #65. ... This article is about the original comic book character named Captain America. ... For other uses, see Champion (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Daredevil (comics). ... This article is about the superheroes. ... This article is about the superhero. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Look up Hulk in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Hulk may refer to: Hulk (comics), a comic book superhero in the Marvel Comics universe Hulk (film), a 2003 film based on the comic book character, directed by Ang Lee Hulk (ship), a type of ships Hulk (roller coaster), a roller coaster... Namor the Sub-Mariner is a fictional character featured in the Marvel Comics Universe, and one of the oldest superhero characters. ... She-Hulk (Jennifer Walters) is a Marvel Comics superheroine. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is an American comic book series published by Marvel Comics, and additionally a spin-off television program and a daily newspaper comic strip, all featuring the adventures of the superhero Spider-Man. ... For the eponymous team and other X-Men comic books, see X-Men. ... X-Men is a Marvel Comics series featuring the homonymous group of mutant superheroes. ... X-Men: The Hidden Years is a comic book series in the Marvel Comics universe starring the companys popular superhero team the X-Men. ...

DC Comics

  • Action Comics (writer/artist #584-600); (artist) #827-835; Annual 1 (writer); Annual 6 (writer/artist)
  • Adventures of Superman (Writer) #436-442, 444; (inker) Annual #2
  • Batman/Captain America (one shot intercompany crossover, published by DC, writer/artist)
  • Blood of the Demon (writer/artist) #1-15
  • Doom Patrol #1-18 (writer/artist)
  • The Man of Steel (writer/artist) (6-issue Mini series)
  • Green Lantern: Ganthet’s Tale (one shot; script/artist, from a story by Larry Niven)
  • Jack Kirby’s Fourth World #1-20 (writer/artist)
  • JLA (Writer/Artist #94-99, with Chris Claremont)
  • Legends (Mini series) (pencils)
  • New Gods (vol. 4) #12-15 (writer/artist)
  • OMAC (4-issue miniseries)
  • Superman (vol. 2) (writer) #1-22; (Artist) #1-17, 19-22; 50 (Artist)
  • The All New Atom (artist) #1-3
  • World of Krypton #1-4 (Mini series) (writer & cover artist)
  • World of Metropolis #1-4 (Mini series) (writer & cover artist)
  • World of Smallville #1-4 (Mini series) (writer & cover artist)
  • Wonder Woman (Vol. 2) (Writer/Artist) #101-136

Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... The death of Superman and its aftermath ran through a number of issues of the Superman comics in 1992-93. ... In comic books, an intercompany crossover (also called cross-company or company crossover) is a comic or series of comics where characters published by one company meet those published by another (for example, DC Comics Superman meeting Marvels Spider-Man). ... The Demon is a DC Comics superhero series created by comic book master, Jack Kirby. ... The Doom Patrol is a fictional superhero team appearing in publications from DC Comics. ... The Man of Steel is a nickname often used to describe the nearly indestructible comic book superhero, Superman. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New Gods #1 (February-March 1971) featuring Orion. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... Legends was a six issue comic book limited series published in 1986-1987 by DC Comics, which had plot threads running through several other DC comic titles, crossing over into them (each individual crossover/tie-in had a Legends Chapter # header on the cover). ... The New Gods are a fictional race published by DC Comics, as well as the title for four series of comics about those characters. ... One-Man Army Corps (OMAC) is a superhero comic book created by Jack Kirby and published by DC Comics. ... The cover to Superman vol. ...

Dark Horse Comics

Cover to Danger Unlimited #1. ... John Byrnes Next Men (also simply Next Men or JBNM) is a comic book series written and drawn by John Byrne. ...

Novels

  • John L. Byrne’s Fear Book (1988; ISBN 0-446-34814-7)
  • Whipping Boy (1992; ISBN 0-440-21171-9)
  • Wonder Woman: Gods and Goddesses (1997, ISBN 0-7615-0483-4)

Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ...

Newspaper Strips

  • Funky Winkerbean (2003) (fill-in penciler for ten weeks)

Webcomics

  • You Go, Ghoul! (2004)[37]

Audio/video

  • Interview with Around Comics

Footnotes

  1. ^ The Man of Steel #1 (Oct. 1986)
  2. ^ Byrne Robotics Forum: "Journey into Comics". URL accessed on December 2, 2005
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Michael Thomas, "John Byrne: The Hidden Answers", Comic Book Resources, August 22, 2000. URL accessed on May 17, 2008.
  4. ^ The John Byrne Gallery: "Images from John’s College Days". URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  5. ^ John Byrne, "Too-Much-Reality Check", Slushfactory.com, January 29, 2003. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  6. ^ Byrne Robotics FAQ: Questions About Comic Book Projects. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  7. ^ Frank Plowright, ed. The Slings & Arrows Comic Guide. Aurum Press, 1997.
  8. ^ Qtd. in Christopher Mari, "John Byrne", Current Biography Yearbook 2000, pages 81–4. H.W. Wilson, Co.
  9. ^ Marcia Allass, "The Superheroes’ Mr. Fix-It: John Byrne", Sequential Tart, vol. 2, issue 6, June 1999. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  10. ^ a b Peter Sanderson, Amazing Heroes #96, June 1986. Excerpted here (dead link).
  11. ^ a b Byrne Robotics FAQ: Questions About Aborted Storylines. URL accessed March 18, 2006.
  12. ^ Comic Book Resources, November 15, 2000. Accessed August 8, 2007.
  13. ^ The Unofficial Funky Winkerbean Fan Page, URL accessed on January 25, 2008.
  14. ^ The Glyph, "The 2004 Festival of Cartoon Art — In a Series of Snapshots", URL accessed on January 25, 2008.
  15. ^ a b Cooke,, Jon B.; Nolen-Weathington, Eric (2006). Modern Masters Volume 7: John Byrne, 1st ed., TwoMorrows Publishing, 77. ISBN 189390556X. 
  16. ^ MacQuarrie, Jim (July 27, 2006). CCI XTRA: Spotlight on Gail Simone. CBR News—The Comics Wire. Comic Book Resources. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  17. ^ PeterDavid.net: “The Comedy Stylings of John Byrne,” by Peter David, May 27, 2006
  18. ^ a b Rich Johnston, “Lying in the Gutters,” Comic Book Resources, July 19, 2004. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  19. ^ qtd. in Rodrigo Baeza, “Acting in the office of a parrot.” URL accessed January 31, 2006.
  20. ^ Destroyer Duck, Eclipse Comics, 1981–83, issues #1–5; the letters page of #5 discusses the physical likeness and similarity of names, and acknowledges that the character is a response to comments Byrne made in the fan press.
  21. ^ Eric Evans, “What Kirby Wanted,” foreword to Savage Dragon Companion #1 (Image Comics, July 2002), p. 5.
  22. ^ Isabella, Tony (December 16, 2004). Tony Isabella, Dec 16, 2004. Tony’s Online Tips. World Famous Comics. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  23. ^ zan. Don’t Do It to Me Again!. Viewpoints. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  24. ^ (May/June 2008) Skeptical Inquirer. Amherst, New York: Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, p. 65.  In his letter to the editor, he discussed how he came to realize that "footsteps" his family were hearing in his house were actually caused by the foundation shifting due to old wood support beams in his cellar. When they were replaced, the "footsteps" stopped.
  25. ^ Byrne Robotics: Byrnisms
  26. ^ eSkeptic (magazine’s online newsletter), Jan. 5, 2005: “Science and the Search for Meaning,” by Michael Shermer
  27. ^ John Byrne, Learn to Draw Comics, p. 46, Collins, 2001. ISBN 0-00-413411-7.
  28. ^ Ron Goulart, The Great Comic Book Artists, pg. 18. St Martin’s Press, 1986. ISBN 0-312-34557-7.
  29. ^ Scott McCloud, “The Big Triangle.” URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  30. ^ Byrne Robotics FAQ: Creative Process. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.
  31. ^ Comics Feature #19, 1982. Excerpted here. URL accessed December 2, 2005.
  32. ^ Gelatometti: 3 Doors Down. URL accessed December 2, 2005
  33. ^Todd McFarlane Complete Biography,” Spawn.com. URL accessed December 2, 2005.
  34. ^ Alexander Ness, “A Conversation with Bryan Hitch,” Slushfactory.com, September 12, 2003.
  35. ^ Scott Beatty, “Behind the Scenes: Words and Pictures with Marcos Martín!” URL accessed December 2, 2005.
  36. ^ SlushFactory.com: IMO (column), “Your Old Stuff Was Better,” by John Byrne. July 8, 2003
  37. ^ Byrne Robotics: Web Comics. URL accessed on December 2, 2005.

Comic Book Resources logo Comic Book Resources is a website dedicated to the coverage of comic book-related news and discussion. ... Peter Sanderson is a comic book historian, as well as a professor on the graphic novel as literature at New York University. ... Amazing Heroes was a magazine about the comic book medium that was published by Fantagraphics Books from 1981 to 1992. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Comic Book Artist is an American magazine devoted to anecdotal histories of American comic books, with emphasis on comics published since the 1960s. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Rich Johnston is the leading comic book industry columnist on the internet. ... Eclipse Comics was an American comic book publisher, one of several influential indendent publishers during the 1980s. ... Image Comics is an American comic book publisher. ... Tony Isabella (born December 22, 1951) is an American comic book writer and commentator, best known as the creator and writer of Black Lightning, DC Comics first major African American superhero. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ...

References

External links

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John Byrne
Preceded by
Dave Cockrum
Uncanny X-Men artist
1977–1981
Succeeded by
Dave Cockrum
Preceded by
Keith Pollard
Fantastic Four artist
1979–1980
Succeeded by
Bill Sienkiewicz
Preceded by
Doug Moench (writer)
Bill Sienkiewicz(artist)
Fantastic Four writer and artist
1980–1986
Succeeded by
Roger Stern (writer)
John Buscema(artist)
Preceded by
Roger McKenzie
Captain America writer
1980
(with Roger Stern)
Succeeded by
Roger Stern
Preceded by
Bill Mantlo
Incredible Hulk writer
1985–1986
Succeeded by
Al Milgrom
Preceded by
Joe Casey
(Incredible) Hulk writer
1999
Succeeded by
Ron Garney & Jerry Ordway
Preceded by
Ralph Macchio
Avengers writer
1989–1990
Succeeded by
Fabian Nicieza (main stories)
Mark Gruenwald (back-up stories)
Preceded by
Dwayne McDuffie
Iron Man writer
1990–1992
Succeeded by
Len Kaminski
Preceded by
Rafael Kayanan
Amazing Spider-Man artist
1999–2000
Succeeded by
John Romita, Jr.
Preceded by
Chris Claremont
Uncanny X-Men writer
1991–1992
Succeeded by
Scott Lobdell
Preceded by
Chris Claremont
X-Men (vol. 2) writer
1992
Succeeded by
Jim Lee
Preceded by
William Messner-Loebs
Wonder Woman writer
1995–1998
Succeeded by
Christopher Priest
Persondata
NAME Byrne, John Lindley
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Comic book artist and writer
DATE OF BIRTH July 6, 1950
PLACE OF BIRTH Walsall, England
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Comic Book Artist is an American magazine primarily devoted to anecdotal histories of American comic books, with emphasis on comics published between the 1960s and the present-day. ... Comic Book Artist is an American magazine primarily devoted to anecdotal histories of American comic books, with emphasis on comics published between the 1960s and the present-day. ... The cover of Giant-Size X-Men #1 by Gil Kane & Cockrum, featuring characters Cockrum designed. ... For the eponymous team and other X-Men comic books, see X-Men. ... The cover of Giant-Size X-Men #1 by Gil Kane & Cockrum, featuring characters Cockrum designed. ... Keith Pollard is an American comic book artist. ... This article is about the superheroes. ... Bill Sienkiewicz in Gijón, Spain. ... Doug Moench (born February 23, 1948) is an American comic book writer. ... Bill Sienkiewicz in Gijón, Spain. ... The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... John Buscema, true name Giovanni Natale Buscema (December 11, 1927–January 10, 2002) was an American comic book artist and one of the mainstays of Marvel Comics in its 1960s and 1970s heyday. ... Roger McKenzie is an American comic book writer. ... This article is about the original comic book character named Captain America. ... The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... The Hobgoblin character co-created by Stern. ... Bill Mantlo (born November 9,[1] 1951) is an American comic-book writer, primarily at Marvel Comics, and an attorney, best-known for his work on two licensed toy properties whose adventures occurred in the Marvel Universe: the Eagle Award-winning Micronauts and the long-running Rom. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Cover to West Coast Avengers #1, Art by Milgrom Allen Al Milgrom is an American comic book writer, penciller, inker and editor. ... Joe Casey is an American comic book writer. ... The Incredible Hulk The Hulk, often called The Incredible Hulk, is a Marvel Comics superhero. ... Ron Garney is a comic book artist. ... The covers of both the hardcover and the softcover versions of the Power of Shazam! graphic novel by Ordway. ... Ralph Macchio is a comic book editor. ... The Avengers is a superhero team that appear in the fictional Marvel Universe. ... Cover to New Warriors #1 (July, 1990), one of Niciezas earliest successes. ... Mark Gruenwald (June 18, 1953-August 12, 1996) was an American comic book writer and editor. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ... This article is about the superhero. ... Rafael Kayanan (born September 13, 1962, Manila) is a Filipino-born naturalised American artist of comic books. ... The Amazing Spider-Man is the title of both a comic book published by Marvel Comics and a daily newspaper comic strip. ... John Salvatore Romita, Jr. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Scott Lobdell (born 1963) is an American comic book writer. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... X-Men is a Marvel Comics series featuring the homonymous group of mutant superheroes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... William Messner-Loebs (known informally as Bill Loebs) is a Michigan comic book writer and artist. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... Quantum & Woody: Directors Cut Trade by VALIANT Comics Christopher James Priest, born James Christopher Owsley in 1961, is a writer of comic books. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... , Walsall is a large industrial town in the West Midlands of England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The John Byrne Gallery (37 words)
All material and commentary posted to this site by John Byrne is © John Byrne Inc.
Nothing may be reproduced in whole or in part
without the written permission of John Byrne and/or the respective copyright holders.
John Byrne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2927 words)
Byrne was born in England, but his family moved to Canada when he was eight.
Byrne's series was comedic and the She-Hulk, who was aware she was in a comic book, regularly broke the fourth wall.
Byrne's reputation for such statements can be traced back at least as far as 1982, when during a panel discussion at the Dallas Fantasy Fair, Byrne made unflattering comments about Roy Thomas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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