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Encyclopedia > John Breckinridge
John Breckinridge served many positions in government throughout his life.
John Breckinridge served many positions in government throughout his life.
For the actor, see Bunny Breckinridge.

John Breckinridge (December 2, 1760 to December 14, 1806) was a United States Senator and Attorney General. John Breckinridge; image is from http://bioguide. ... John Bunny Breckinridge was a friend of legendary hack director Ed Wood Jr. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1760 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... December 14 is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ...


Born in Staunton, Virginia, a frontier town, Breckinridge was nonetheless able to attend the prestigeous William and Mary College. He was first elected to the Virginia legislature while he was only 19 years old and still a student, but because he was underage he was not allowed to serve until he was elected for his third time. West Beverley Street in downtown Staunton Staunton is an independent city within the confines of Augusta County in the state of Virginia. ... The College of William and Mary in Virginia is a public, liberal-arts university located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Official language(s) English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ...


Breckinridge served in the Virginia militia during the U.S. Revolutionary War. Afterwards he studied law, and began a private practice in Charlottesville, Virginia. He was elected to the United States Congress, but resigned in 1792 before his term even began. A militia is a group of citizens organized to provide paramilitary service. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Founded Incorporated 1762   County Independent City Mayor David Brown Area  - Total  - Water 177. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ...


In 1793 he moved to Lexington, Kentucky and began to practice law there. He purchased 2,467 acres (10 km²) of land and established a horse breeding operation that would become Castleton Farm, one of the most famous names in American horse racing history. He ran for a seat in the United States Senate in 1794, but was not elected. He was, however, appointed as Attorney General of Kentucky in 1795, although he resigned this position as well in 1797. He then successfully ran for a seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives, and served for two years. During this time he became the Speaker of the House. City nickname: Horse Capital of the World Location in the state of Kentucky Downtown Lexington, Kentucky County Fayette Mayor Teresa Isaac Area  - Land  - Water 285. ... Castleton Lyons near Lexington, Kentucky is an American horse racing stable and breeding business best known by the name Castleton Farm. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ... The term Speaker is usually the title given to the presiding officer of a countrys lower house of parliament or congress (ie: the House of Commons or House of Representatives). ...


In 1799 he served in Kentucky's constitutional convention. Afterwards he ran, this time as a Democratic-Republican, for a seat in the United States Senate, and he was elected. He served from March 4, 1801, until August 7, 1805, when he resigned again, this time to accept an appointment as the Attorney General of the United States under President Thomas Jefferson. The Democratic-Republican party was a United States political party, which evolved early in the history of the United States. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson (April 13 (April 2 Old Style), 1743 – July 4, 1826) was the third (1801–1809) President of the United States, second (1797–1801) Vice President, first (1789–1795) United States Secretary of State, and an American statesman, ambassador to France, political philosopher, revolutionary, agriculturalist, horticulturist, land owner, architect...


By many accounts, Breckinridge was an important advisor to Jefferson, and he sponsored Jefferson's Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions. In 1806, while still serving as Attorney General, Breckinridge died. He was buried in Lexington Cemetery. The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, also known as the Virginia and Kentucky Resolves, were passed in opposition to the Alien and Sedition Acts. ...


He was the grandfather of John C. Breckinridge, fourteenth Vice President of the United States. He was also an ancestor of John B. Breckinridge who succeeded him as Attorney General of Kentucky and as a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives and who also served in the United States House of Representatives. Many people and places have been named after him. John C. Breckinridge John Cabell Breckinridge (January 16, 1821–May 17, 1875) was a lawyer, U.S. Representative, Senator from Kentucky, the fourteenth Vice President of the United States, and a Confederate general in the American Civil War. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... John Bayne Breckinridge (November 29, 1913 - July 29, 1979), a Democrat, served as Attorney General of Kentucky twice and also served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky. ... Kentucky House of Representatives is the lower house of the Kentucky General Assembly, the state legislature of Kentucky. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the Senate. ...


Further reading

  • Harrison, Lowell. John Breckinridge, Jeffersonian Republican. Louisville: Filson Club, 1969
  • Klotter, James C. The Breckinridges of Kentucky: Two Centuries of Leadership. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1986.

External link

  • Congressional biography
Preceded by:
Robert Smith
Attorney General of the United States
1805-1806
Succeeded by:
Caesar A. Rodney
Preceded by:
George Nicholas
Attorney General of Kentucky
1793–1797
Succeeded by:
James Blair
United States Attorneys General Seal of the United States Department of Justice

Randolph | Bradford | Lee | Lincoln | R Smith | Breckinridge | Rodney | Pinkney | Rush | Wirt | Berrien | Taney | Butler | Grundy | Gilpin | Crittenden | Legaré | Nelson | Mason | Clifford | Toucey | Johnson | Crittenden | Cushing | Black | Stanton | Speed | Stanberry | Evarts | Hoar | Akerman | Williams | Pierrepont | Taft | Devens | MacVeagh | Brewster | Garland | Miller | Olney | Harmon | McKenna | Griggs | Knox | Moody | Bonaparte | Wickersham | McReynolds | Gregory | Palmer | Daugherty | Stone | Sargent | W Mitchell | Cummings | Murphy | Jackson | Biddle | T Clark | McGrath | McGranery | Brownell | Rogers | Kennedy | Katzenbach | R Clark | J Mitchell | Kleindienst | Richardson | Saxbe | Levi | Bell | Civiletti | W Smith | Meese | Thornburgh | Barr | Reno | Ashcroft | Gonzales Robert Smith (November 3, 1757–November 26, 1842) was the second United States Secretary of the Navy from 1801 to 1809 and the sixth United States Secretary of State from 1809 to 1811. ... 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  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Senate: Art & History Home > John Cabell Breckinridge, 14th Vice President (1857-1861) (3366 words)
Breckinridge was a Jacksonian Democrat in a state that Senator Henry Clay had made a Whig bastion.
Breckinridge became a spokesman for the proslavery Democrats, arguing that the federal government had no right to interfere with slavery anywhere, either in the District of Columbia or in any of the territories.
Breckinridge got so close to Washington that he could see the newly completed Capitol dome, and General Early joked that he would allow him to lead the advance into the city so that he could sit in the vice-presidential chair again.
John Cabell Breckinridge - LoveToKnow 1911 (592 words)
JOHN CABELL BRECKINRIDGE (1821-1875), American soldier and political leader, was born near Lexington, Kentucky, on the 21st of January 1821.
His grandfather, John Breckinridge (1760-1806), who revised Jefferson's draft of the "Kentucky Resolutions" of 1798, was a United States senator from Kentucky in1801-1805and attorney-general in President Jefferson's cabinet in 1805-1806.
Another cousin, Joseph Cabell Breckinridge (1842-), served on the Union side in the Civil War, was a major-general of volunteers during the Spanish-American War (1898),(1898), became a major-general in the regular United States army in 1903, and was inspector-general of the United States army from 1899 until his retirement from active service in 1904.
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