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Encyclopedia > John Blow
John Blow
John Blow

John Blow (1649October 1, 1708) was an English composer and organist. His pupils included William Croft and Henry Purcell. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... // Events January 30 - King Charles I of England, Scotland and Ireland is beheaded. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem No official anthem - the United Kingdom anthem God Save the Queen is commonly used England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto)1 Unified  -  by Athelstan 927 AD  Area  -  Total... A composer is a person who writes music. ... An organist is a musician who plays the organ, whether pipe or electronic. ... William Croft (December 30 (baptism), 1678 - August 14, 1727) was an English composer and teacher. ... Henry Purcell Henry Purcell (IPA: [1]; September 10 (?) [2], 1659–November 21, 1695), a Baroque composer, is generally considered to be one of Englands greatest composers. ...


Blow was probably born at North Collingham in Nottinghamshire. He became a chorister of the Chapel Royal, and distinguished himself by his proficiency in music. Collingham is a village in Nottinghamshire in England. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... The Chapel Royal did not originally refer to a building but an establishment in the Royal Household. ...


He composed several anthems at an unusually early age, including Lord, Thou host been our refuge, Lord, rebuke me not and the so-called "club anthem", I will always give thanks, the last in collaboration with Pelham Humfrey and William Turner, either in honour of a victory over the Dutch in 1665, or more probably simply to commemorate the friendly intercourse of the three choristers. An anthem is a composition to an English religious text sung in the context of an Anglican service. ... Pelham Humfrey (or Humphrey, Humfreys etc; 1647-74) was an English composer whose early death, at the age of 27, probably deprived the country of a significant and influential talent. ... Year 1665 (MDCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


To this time also belongs the composition of a two-part setting of Robert Herrick's Goe, perjur'd man, written at the request of Charles II to imitate Giacomo Carissimi's Dite, o cieli. In 1669 Blow became organist of Westminster Abbey. In 1673 he was made a gentleman of the Chapel Royal and in the September of this year he married Elizabeth Braddock, who died in childbirth ten years later. Robert Herrick Gather Ye Rosebuds While Ye May, by John William Waterhouse, (1908) Gather Ye rosebuds While Ye May, by John William Waterhouse, (1909) Robert Herrick (baptized August 24, 1591- October 1674) was a 17th century English poet. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... Giacomo Carissimi (baptized April 18, 1605 – January 12, 1674, Rome), was an Italian composer, one of the most celebrated masters of the early Baroque, or, more accurately, the Roman School of music. ... // Events Samuel Pepys stopped writing his diary. ... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ... 1673 (MDCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Blow, who by 1678 was a doctor of music, was named in 1685 one of the private musicians of James II. Between 1680 and 1687 he wrote his only stage composition of which any record survives, the Masque for the entertainment of the King, Venus and Adonis. In this Mary Davies played the part of Venus, and her daughter by Charles II, Lady Mary Tudor, appeared as Cupid. Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... Events February 6 - James Stuart, Duke of York becomes King James II of England and Ireland and King James VII of Scotland. ... James II of England (also known as James VII of Scotland; 14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... Costume for a Knight, by Inigo Jones: the plumed helmet, the heroic torso in armour and other conventions were still employed for opera seria in the 18th century. ... A painting of Venus and Adonis by Cornelis van Haarlem, 1614 Venus and Adonis is an opera in three acts and a prologue by the English Baroque composer John Blow, composed c. ... Arms of the Dukes of Westminster (since 1825) The title of Duke of Westminster was created by Queen Victoria in 1874 and bestowed upon Richard Grosvenor, the 3rd Marquess of Westminster. ... Marble Venus of the Capitoline Venus type, Roman (British Museum) Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. ... It has been suggested that Cupid (holiday character) be merged into this article or section. ...


In 1687 he became master of the choir of St Paul's Cathedral; in 1695 he was elected organist of St Margaret's, Westminster, and is said to have resumed his post as organist of Westminster Abbey, from which in 1680 he had retired or been dismissed to make way for Purcell. In 1699 he was appointed to the newly created post of Composer to the Chapel Royal. Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... This article is about the cathedral church of the diocese of London. ... Jan. ... The Anglican church of St. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ...


Fourteen services and more than a hundred anthems by Blow are known. In addition to his purely ecclesiastical music Blow wrote Great sir, the joy of all our hearts, an ode for New Year's Day 1682, similar compositions for 1683, 1686, 1687, 1688, 1689, 1693 (?), 1694 and 1700; odes, and the like, for the celebration of St Cecilia's Day for 1684, 1691, 1695 and 1700; for the coronation of James II, two anthems, Behold, O God, our Defender and God spake sometimes in visions; some harpsichord pieces for the second part of Henry Playford's Musick's handmaid (1689); Epicedium for Queen Mary (1695) and Ode on the Death of Purcell (1696). In 1700 he published his Amphion Anglicus, a collection of pieces of music for one, two, three and four voices, with a figured bass accompaniment. In Anglican church music, a Service is a musical setting of certain parts of the liturgy, generally for choir with or without organ accompaniment. ... Ode (Classical Greek: ) is a form of stately and elaborate lyrical verse. ... Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... Events June 6 - The Ashmolean Museum opens as the worlds first university museum. ... 1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events March 19 - The men under explorer Robert Cavelier de La Salle murder him while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi River. ... // Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... Events February 6 - The colony Quilombo dos Palmares is destroyed. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Saint Cecilia Saint Cecilia in the Catholic Church the patron saint of music and of the blind. ... Events France under Louis XIV makes Truce of Ratisbon separately with the Empire and Spain. ... Events March 5 - French troops under Marshal Louis-Francois de Boufflers besiege the Spanish-held town of Mons March 20 - Leislers Rebellion - New governor arrives in New York - Jacob Leisler surrenders after standoff of several hours March 29 - Siege of Mons ends to the city’s surrender May 6... Jan. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is any of a family of European keyboard instruments, including the large instrument currently called a harpsichord, but also the smaller virginals, the muselar virginals and the spinet. ... Henry Playford 1657-c1707 was the younger son of John Playford and his only known surviving child. ... Events Louis XIV of France passed the Code Noir, allowing the full use of slaves in the French colonies. ... Jan. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of integer musical notation used to indicate intervals, chords, and nonchord tones, in relation to a bass note. ...


A famous page in Charles Burney's History of Music is devoted to illustrations of Blow's "crudities", most of which only show the meritorious if immature efforts in expression characteristic of English music at the time, while some of them (where Burney says "Here we are lost") are really excellent. Blow died on October 1, 1708 at his house in Broad Sanctuary, and was buried in the north aisle of Westminster Abbey. Charles Burney by Sir Joshua Reynolds in 1781 Charles Burney (April 12, 1726 – April 12, 1814) was an English music historian and father of author Fanny Burney. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March 23 - James Francis Edward Stuart lands at the Firth of Forth July 1 - Tewoflos becomes Emperor of Ethiopia September 28 - Peter the Great defeats the Swedes at the Battle of Lesnaya Kandahar conquered by Mir Wais In Masuria one third of the population die during the plague J... The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. ...


Media

  • John Blow's Prelude ( file info) — play in browser (beta)
    • Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Image File history File links John_Blow_--_Prelude. ... Software development stages In computer programming, development stage terminology expresses how the development of a piece of software has progressed and how much further development it may require. ...

References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
John Blow
Cultural offices
Preceded by
Albertus Bryan
Organist and Master of the Choristers of Westminster Abbey
16681679
Succeeded by
Henry Purcell
Preceded by
Henry Purcell
Organist and Master of the Choristers of Westminster Abbey
16961708
Succeeded by
William Croft

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Blow - LoveToKnow 1911 (371 words)
JOHN BLOW (1648-1708), English musical composer, was born in 1648, probably at North Collingham in Nottinghamshire.
Blow, who by the year 1678 was a doctor of music, was named in 1685 one of the private musicians of James II.
Blow died on the 1st of October 1708 at his house in Broad Sanctuary, and was buried in the north aisle of Westminster Abbey.
John Blow: Information from Answers.com (1247 words)
Blow studied with the chorus master Henry Cooke, and later with Christopher Gibbons, the son of Orlando Gibbons and a composer of lesser rank.
Blow was appointed organist (he was one of three) at the Chapel Royal in 1676, but despite his apparent successes and later affluence, he seems to have had some financial struggles during his married years, if one can judge by the family's modest living quarters.
Blow continued composing at a fairly prolific rate in the latter years of the seventeenth century and garnered further posts, including master of choristers at St. Paul's Cathedral, in 1687.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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