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Encyclopedia > John Baskerville
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John Baskerville (January 28, 1706 - January 8, 1775) was a printer in Birmingham, a member of the Royal Society of Arts, and an associate of some of the members of the Lunar Society. He directed his punchcutter John Handy in the design of many typefaces of broadly similar appearance. Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links John_Baskerville. ... Jump to: navigation, search January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... Jump to: navigation, search January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The word printer is used to describe a company that provides commercial printing services, involving typesetting, printing and book-binding. ... See also Birmingham, USA, and other places called Birmingham. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a British multi-disciplinary institution, based in London. ... The Lunar Society was a discussion club of prominent industrialists and scientists, who met regularly between 1765 and 1813 in Birmingham, England. ... Jump to: navigation, search Punchcutting is the process by which matrices were made in hard metal for type founding in the early days. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


His businesses included japanning and papier-mâché, but he is best remembered as a printer. He printed works for Cambridge University in 1758 and although an atheist, printed a splendid folio Bible in 1763. His fonts were greatly admired by fellow member of the Royal Society of Arts, Benjamin Franklin, who took the designs back to the newly created United States of America where they were adopted for most federal government publishing. Papier-mâché (French, chewed-up paper) is a construction material that consists of pieces of paper, sometimes reinforced with textiles, stuck together using a wet paste (e. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... 1758 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ... Folio: In bookbinding, a sheet of paper, parchment, or other material folded in half to make two leaves in a codex. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Bible (sometimes The Book, Good Book, Word of God, or Scripture), from Greek (τα) βιβλια, (ta) biblia, (the) books, plural of βιβλιον, biblion, book, originally a diminutive of βιβλος, biblos, which in turn is derived from βυβλος—byblos, meaning papyrus, from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this... Jump to: navigation, search 1763 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is a British multi-disciplinary institution, based in London. ... Jump to: navigation, search Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 For the former mayor of Nepean, see Ben Franklin (politician) Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was an American publisher, journalist, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, statesman, scientist, librarian, diplomat and inventor. ...


His work was criticised by jealous competitors and soon fell out of favour, but since the 1920s many new fonts have been released by Linotype, Monotype, and other type foundries - revivals of his work and mostly called 'Baskerville'. Jump to: navigation, search Sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or primarily in North America as the Roaring Twenties . In Europe it is sometimes refered to as the Golden Twenties. ... In typography, a typeface is a co-ordinated set of character designs, which usually comprises an alphabet of letters, a set of numerals and a set of punctuation marks. ... Linotype typesetting machine Originally an American company, formed in 1886 to market the linecaster invented by Ottmar Mergenthaler, Mergenthaler Linotype (pronounced LINEotype ) became the worlds leading manufacturer of book and newspaper typesetting equipment. ... Currently Monotype Imaging, Inc, a typesetting and typeface design company responsible for many developments in printing technology — in particular the Monotype machine which was the first fully mechanical typesetter — and the design and production of typefaces in the 19th and 20th centuries. ... Jump to: navigation, search A type foundry is a company that produces and/or distributes typefaces. ...


It is thought that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who once lived in Birmingham, may have borrowed his name for one of his Sherlock Holmes stories, The Hound of the Baskervilles. Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle (May 22, 1859 – July 7, 1930) is the British author most famously known for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction. ... Jump to: navigation, search Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes (1854–1957, according to William S. Baring-Gould) is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, created by British author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialised in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor 1889. ...


As an atheist, Baskerville was buried, at his own request, in unconsecrated ground in his own garden. When a canal was built through the land he was placed in storage in a warehouse for several years before being secretly deposited in the crypt of Christ Church, Birmingham. Later he was moved, with other bodies from the crypt, to consecrated catacombs at Warstone Lane Cemetery. The Canal du Midi in Toulouse, France Canals are man-made waterways, usually connecting existing lakes, rivers, or oceans. ... Inside Green Logistics Co. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... To consecrate an inaminate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... The word catacomb comes from Greek kata kumbas (L. ad catacumbas), near the low place and originally it meant a certain burial district in Rome. ...


Sculpture

A Portland Stone sculpture, Industry and Genius, in his honour stands in Centenary Square, Birmingham. It is by local artist David Patten [1]. The Cenotaph, in Whitehall, London, England, is made from Portland stone Portland stone is limestone from the Jurassic period quarried on the Isle of Portland, Dorset. ... Image:Greekgod. ... Named in celebration of the centenary of Birminghams city status (1989). ... Jump to: navigation, search The city from above Centenary Square. ... Jump to: navigation, search David Patten is an American football player. ...


Related articles

Typography Typographic work Typography (from the Greek words typos = form and grapho = write) is the art and technique of selecting and arranging type styles, point sizes, line lengths, line leading, character spacing, and word spacing for typeset applications. ...


External links

  • Birmingham City Council page on Baskerville (includes picture of Industry and Genius)
  • More about Baskerville

  Results from FactBites:
 
John Baskerville - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (315 words)
John Baskerville (January 28, 1706 - January 8, 1775) was a printer in Birmingham, a member of the Royal Society of Arts, and an associate of some of the members of the Lunar Society.
As an atheist, Baskerville was buried, at his own request, in unconsecrated ground in his own garden.
When a canal was built through the land he was placed in storage in a warehouse for several years before being secretly deposited in the crypt of Christ Church, Birmingham.
More about John Baskerville (2006 words)
John Baskerville was born in 1706 at Wolverley in Worcestershire.
John Baskerville was a friend of the Boulton family, and a good friend and mentor to the young Matthew Boulton as he was growing up.
The bodies in the vaults were removed and Baskerville’s body was reinterred in the Church of England cemetery in Warstone Lane in a vault under the chapel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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