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Encyclopedia > John Axon

John Axon GC (4 December 19009 February 1957) was an English engine driver from Stockport (Edgeley Depot) who died while trying to stop a runaway freight train on a 1 in 58 gradient near Buxton in Derbyshire after a brake failure. The train consisted of an ex-LMS Stanier Class 8F 2-8-0 No. 48188 hauling 33 wagons and a brake van. The George Cross (GC) is the highest civil decoration of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... December 4th redirects here. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Languages English Religions Christianity (Anglicanism, Roman Catholicism and other minority denominations), and other faiths. ... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... An unidentified 8F with a coal train (a typical duty) in 1966. ...


On the outward trip from Stockport to Buxton that day Driver Axon had noticed a leak from the supply to the locomotive steam brake, and had requested and received fitter's attention at the Buxton depot. On the return trip from Buxton to Stockport the repair did not hold and the supply pipe broke away from the steam brake disabling the locomotive steam brake and whistle. This filled the locomotive cab with scalding steam and prevented Driver John Axon and Fireman Ron Scanlon from reaching the controls. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


The crew of the banking engine at the rear of Driver Axon's train were unaware of the problems at the front and unfortunately kept pushing Driver Axon's train towards Dove Holes summit. Driver Axon told his Fireman Scanlon to jump off and attempt to apply wagon brakes but due to the speed the train was travelling he only managed to apply a few before the train reached the summit and began accelerating down the 1 in 58 gradient towards Chapel-en-le-Frith. The lickey banker 58100 Big Bertha assisting an express up the Lickey, July or August 1955. ... Chapel-en-le-Frith railway station is on the Stockport to Buxton line. ...


At the time of the locomotive failure, Driver Axon could have jumped clear of the then slow-moving train. However, aware of the danger that his train posed to life further down the line, he stayed with his accelerating train despite the scalding steam on the footplate. He probably hoped to regain control of his train on reaching a more favourable gradient.


Warned by the Dove Holes signalman, the staff at Chapel-en-le-Frith were able to evacuate a two-car DMU, but had not time to warn the crew of a Rowsley to Stockport freight. The runaway smashed into the rear of it killing both the guard and Axon himself. DMU, type SA108 of Great Poland Voivodship in Poznań, Poland The Transwa Prospector DEMU capable of up to 200km/h provides a passenger service between Perth, Western Australia and the mining town of Kalgoorlie A Diesel Multiple Unit or DMU is a multiple unit train consisting of multiple carriages powered... Rowsley is a village on the A6 road in the English county of Derbyshire. ... Stockport is a large town in the north west of England. ...


Axon was posthumously awarded the George Cross. He was the subject of a famous radio ballad (The Ballad of John Axon), the first of the series, written by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger and produced by Charles Parker. The George Cross (GC) is the highest civil decoration of the Commonwealth of Nations. ... The radio-ballad is an audio documentary format created by Ewan MacColl, Peggy Seeger, and Charles Parker in 1958. ... Ewan MacColl (25 January 1915 - 22 October 1989) was a British folk singer, songwriter, socialist, actor, poet, playwright, and record producer. ... Peggy Seeger (New York City, New York, June 17, 1935 -) is an American folk singer who also achieved renown in Britain, where she lived for more than 30 years as the wife of songwriter Ewan MacColl. ...


On 19 February, 1981, a British Rail Class 86 electric locomotive number 86261, called Driver John Axon, GC was unveiled at Euston Station, London. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Class 86/6, nos. ... Euston station, also known as London Euston, is a major railway station to the north of central London and in the London Borough of Camden. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In February 2007, a Class 150 train was named "Driver John Axon, GC" at Buxton, and a plaque commemorating the events was unveiled, to be mounted at Chapel-en-le Frith station. The plaque is now mounted on the station buildings at Chapel-en-le-Frith facing onto the southbound platform.


See also

Wallace Arnold Oakes GC (23 April 1932 - 12 June 1965) was a train driver with British Railways from Wheelock Heath, Sandbach, Cheshire. ... The Gare de Lyon train accident happened on June 27, 1988 when a commuter train inbound to the Gare de Lyon station in Paris crashed into a stationary train killing 56 people. ... Portrait of The Brave Engineer himself: John Luther Casey Jones, 1863-1900. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
John Axon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (422 words)
John Axon GC (4 December 1900 9 February 1957) was an English train driver from Stockport (Edgeley Depot) who died while trying to stop runaway freight train on a 1 in 58 gradient near Buxton in Derbyshire after a brake failure.
Driver Axon told his Fireman Scanlon to jump off and attempt to apply wagon brakes but due to the speed the train was travelling he only managed to apply a few before the train reached the summit and began accelerating down the 1 in 58 gradient towards Chapel-en-le-Frith.
He was the subject of a famous radio ballad (The Ballad of John Axon), the first of the series, written by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger and produced by Charles Parker.
Radio Ballad No 1 - The Ballad of John Axon (1510 words)
Axon told his fireman to jump clear and then elected to hang on to the outside of his cab in order to warn men in signal boxes along the route.
Axon was killed, although his actions apparently saved the lives of an entire trainload of children.
Axon's widow (how I wish I knew her first name!) describes her husband's love of rambling (giving rise, incidentally to the programme's hit song :"I may be a wage slave on Monday…"), dancing, party-going; his workmates talk about him in glowing terms, how he "made the day seem short while you were at work".
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