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Encyclopedia > Johann Schein
Johann Schein
Johann Schein

Johann Hermann Schein (January 20, 1586November 19, 1630) was a German composer of the early Baroque era. He was born in Grünhain and died in Leipzig. He was one of the first to import the early Italian stylistic innovations into German music, and was one of the most polished composers of the period. Johann Schein Source: [1] Copyright expired due to age of image This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Johann Schein Source: [1] Copyright expired due to age of image This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1586 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 22 - Native American Quadequine introduces Popcorn to English colonists. ... A stereotypical German The Germans (German: die Deutschen), or the German people, are a nation in the meaning an ethnos (in German: Volk), defined more by a sense of sharing a common German culture and having a German mother tongue, than by citizenship or by being subjects to any particular... Baroque music describes an era and a set of styles of European classical music which were in widespread use between approximately 1600 and 1750. ... Grünhain-Beierfeld is a town in the Aue-Schwarzenberg district, in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. ... Leipzig ( ; Sorbian/Lusatian: Lipsk from the Sorbian word for Tilia) is, with a population of over 506,000, the largest city in the federal state of Saxony, Germany. ...

Contents

Biography

On the death of his father, Schein moved to Dresden where he joined the choir of the Elector of Saxony as a boy soprano. In addition to singing in the choir, he received a thorough musical training with Rogier Michael, the Kapellmeister, who recognized his extraordinary talent. From 1603 to 1607 he studied at Pforta, and from 1608 to 1612 attended the University of Leipzig, where he studied law in addition to liberal arts. Upon graduating, he was employed briefly by Gottfried von Wolffersdorff as the house music director and tutor to his children; later he became Kapellmeister at Weimar, and shortly thereafter became cantor at Thomasschule zu Leipzig, a post which he held for the rest of his life. This article is about the city in Germany. ... The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DED Capital Dresden Minister-President Georg Milbradt (CDU) Governing parties CDU / SPD Votes in Bundesrat 4 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  18,416 km² (7,110 sq mi) Population 4,252,000 (11/2006)[1]  - Density 231 /km... Pforta, or Schulpforta, is a former Cistercian monastery (1137-1540), near Naumburg on the Saale River in the German state of Saxony. ... The University of Leipzig (German Universität Leipzig), located in Leipzig in the Free State of Saxony (former Kingdom of Saxony), Germany, is one of the oldest universities in Europe. ... For other uses, see Weimar (disambiguation). ... Thomasschule Leipzig Thomasschule zu Leipzig is a gymnasium based in Leipzig, Germany where students take their abitur (A-levels) in preparation for college or university. ...


Unlike his friend Heinrich Schütz, he was afflicted with poor health, and was not to live a happy or long life. His wife died in childbirth; four of his five children died in infancy; he died at age 44, having suffered from tuberculosis, gout, scurvy and a kidney disorder. Heinrich Schütz. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... Scurvy (N.Lat. ...


Style

Schein was one of the first to absorb the innovations of the Italian Baroque—monody, the concertato style, figured bass—and use them effectively in a German Lutheran context. While Schütz made more than one trip to Italy, Schein apparently spent his entire life in Germany, making his grasp of the Italianate style all the more amazing. His early concertato music seems to have been modeled on Lodovico Grossi da Viadana's Cento concerti ecclesiastici, which was available in an edition prepared in Germany. Caccini, Le Nuove musiche, 1601, title page In poetry, monody is a poem in which one person laments anothers death. ... Concertato (sometimes called stile concertato) is a term in early Baroque music referring to either a genre or a style of music in which groups of instruments or voices share a melody, usually in alternation, and almost always over a basso continuo. ... Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of integer musical notation used to indicate intervals, chords, and nonchord tones, in relation to a bass note. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Lodovico Grossi da Viadana (usually Lodovico Viadana, though his given name was Grossi) (c. ...


Unlike Schütz, who composed only sacred music (except for an early and unrepresentative collection of madrigals), Schein wrote sacred and secular music in approximately equal quantities, and almost all of it was vocal. In his secular vocal music he wrote all of his own texts. Throughout his life he published alternating collections of sacred and secular music, in accordance with an intention he stated early on — in the preface to the Banchetto musicale — to publish alternately music for use in worship and social gatherings. The contrast between the two kinds of music can be quite extreme. While some of his sacred music uses the most sophisticated techniques of the Italian madrigal for a devotional purpose, several of his secular collections include such things as drinking songs of a surprising simplicity and humor. Some of his works attain an expressive intensity matched in Germany only by those of Schütz, for example the spectacular Fontana d'Israel or Israel's Brünnlein (1623), in which Schein declared his intent to exhaust the possibilities of German word-painting "in the style of the Italian madrigal." A madrigal is a setting for two or more voices of a secular text, often in Italian. ... Devotional songs are hymns that accompany religious rituals. ... blah blah blah blah balh blahblahblWord painting (also known as tone painting or text painting) is the musical technique of having the music mimic the literal meaning of a song. ...


Possibly his most famous collection was his only collection of instrumental music, the Banchetto musicale (Musical banquet) (1617) which contains 20 separate variation suites; they are among the earliest, and most perfect, representatives of the form. Most likely they were composed as dinner music for the courts of Weissenfels and Weimar, and were intended to be performed on viols. They consist of dances: a pavan-galliard (a normal early Baroque pair), a courante, and then an allemande-tripla. Each suite in the Banchetto is unified by mode as well as by theme. In music, a suite is an organized set of instrumental or orchestral pieces normally performed at a single sitting, as a separate musical performance, not accompanying an opera, ballet, or theater-piece. ... Weißenfels is a place in the district Weißenfels, Germany. ... Various sizes of viol, from Michael Praetorius Syntagma musicum (1618) Early Italian tenor viola da gamba, detail from the painting , by Raphael Sanzio, c. ... The pavane is a processional dance common in Europe during the 16th century, whether named from an origin in Padua (padovano), from Sanskrit meaning wind, or from the stately sweep of a ladys train likened to a peacocks tail. ... The galliard (gaillarde, in French) was a form of Renaissance dance and music popular all over Europe in the 16th century. ... The courante, corrente, coranto and corant are just some of the names given to a family of triple metre dances from the late Renaissance and the Baroque era. ... An allemande (also spelled allemanda, almain, or alman) (from French German) is a type of dance popular in Baroque music, and a standard element of a suite, generally the first or second movement. ...


Works

Sacred vocal

  • Cymbalum Sionium (1615)
  • Opella nova, geistlicher Concerten (1618)
  • Fontana d'Israel, Israelis Brünlein (1623)
  • Opella nova, ander Theil, geistlicher Concerten (1626)
  • Cantional oder Gesangbuch Augspurgischer Confession (1627, 1645)

Secular vocal

  • Venus Kräntzlein (1609)
  • Musica boscareccia (1621, and several portions published later)
  • Diletti pastorali, Hirten Lust (1624)
  • Studenten-Schmauss (1626)

Instrumental

  • Banchetto musicale (1617)

References

  • Manfred Bukofzer, Music in the Baroque Era. New York, W.W. Norton & Co., 1947. ISBN 0-393-09745-5
  • Article "Johann Hermann Schein," in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, ed. Stanley Sadie. 20 vol. London, Macmillan Publishers Ltd., 1980. ISBN 1-56159-174-2

Manfred Bukofzer (March 27, 1910–December 7, 1955) was a German-American musicologist and humanist. ...

External links

The Werner Icking Music Archive, often abbreviated WIMA, is a web archive of public domain sheet music. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Johann Schein - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (610 words)
Johann Hermann Schein (January 20, 1586 – November 19, 1630) was a German composer of the early Baroque era.
Schein was one of the first to absorb the innovations of the Italian Baroque—monody, the concertato style, figured bass—and use them effectively in a German Lutheran context.
The contrast between the two kinds of music can be quite extreme: while some of his sacred music uses the most sophisticated techniques of the Italian madrigal for a devotional purpose, some of his secular collections include such things as drinking songs of a surprising simplicity and humor.
HOASM: Spiritual Concerto and Church Cantata (1932 words)
Schein, the successor of Calvisius at St. Thomas' in Leipzig and, like Kuhnau, one of the outstanding predecessors of Bach, combined a restless and excitable harmonic sense with a pronounced talent for affective melody.
The style of Schein was heavily indebted to Italian models, especially to Monteverdi's duet style with concerting instruments.
Schein's works stand at the beginning of the long and devious development from the chorale concertato to the chorale cantata.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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