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Encyclopedia > Jogaila
Jogaila or Władysław II Jagiełło
Jogaila or Władysław II Jagiełło
Presumed image of Jogaila, painted c. 1475–80, Kraków, Poland
Born c. 1362
in Vilnius
Died June 1, 1434
in Gródek Jagielloński (now Horodok, Ukraine)
Buried Wawel Cathedral
Reign Lithuanian grand duke (later supreme duke) from 1377; king of Poland from 1386
to 1434
Coronation As Polish king: March 4, 1386
in Wawel Cathedral
Family or dynasty Jagiellon dynasty
Coat of Arms Vytis.
Parents Algirdas
Uliana Alexandrovna of Tver
Marriage and children with Jadwiga of Poland:
 Elżbieta Bonifacja
with Anna of Celje:
 Jadwiga of Lithuania
with Elisabeth of Pilica:
 None
with Sophia of Halshany:
 Władysław III of Poland, † Casimir IV Jagiellon

Jogaila, later Władysław II Jagiełło[1] (c. 1362–1434), was a Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland. He ruled in Lithuania from 1377, at first with his uncle, Kęstutis. In 1386, he converted to Christianity, was baptized as Władysław, married the 12-year-old Queen Jadwiga of Poland, and was crowned Polish king as Władysław Jagiełło.[2] His reign in Poland lasted a further forty-eight years and laid the foundation for the centuries-long Polish-Lithuanian union. He gave his name to the Jagiellon branch of the Gediminids dynasty, which ruled both states until 1572,[3] and became one of the most influential dynasties in medieval Europe.[4] Ladislaus Jagiello can mean: Ladislaus II of Poland Ladislaus II of Bohemia and Hungary This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Vladislaus, Wladislaus, Ladislaus or Ladislas (Polish: Władysław, Czech, Russian: Vladislav, Hungarian: László and Ulászló) is the name of several kings and dukes of Poland, Hungary and Bohemia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 550 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 654 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events May 30, Battle of Lipany in the Hussite Wars Jan van Eyck paints the wedding of Giovanni Arnoflini The Honorable Passing of Arms at the bridge of Obrigo The Portuguese reach Cape Bojador in Western Sahara. ... Horodok (Ukrainian: ) is a city in Lviv Oblast (province) of Ukraine. ... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... StanisÅ‚aw Antoni Szczuka, a Polish nobleman Szlachta ( ) was the noble class in Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the two countries that later jointly formed the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ... The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty originating in Lithuania, which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. ... The history of Polish heraldry is an integral part of the history of the Szlachta, the Polish nobility. ... Vytis. ... Columns of Gediminas Algirdas (approximate English transcription [ˈaːl(É™).gır. ... Uliana Alexandrovna of Tver (Russian: ) (ca. ... This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... Anna of Celje (1386-1416) was Queen consort of Poland and grand duchess of Lithuania, 1402-16 as second wife of Jogaila WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw JagieÅ‚Å‚o of Poland and Lithuania (reigned 1377-1434). ... Jadwiga (8 April 1408 - 8 December 1431) of the House of Jagiellon was a daughter of WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o (ca. ... Elisabeth of Pilica Polish: (1372-1420) was Queen consort of Poland and Grand Duchess of Lithuania (1417-1420) as the third wife of Jogaila (or WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o) who was Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland, reigning 1387 to 1434. ... Sophia of Halshany (Lithuanian: Zofija AlÅ¡Ä—niÅ¡kÄ—; Polish: Zofia HolszaÅ„ska) (1405?-1461), Lithuanian noblewoman from Halshany (Lithuanian AlÅ¡Ä—nai, now Halshany in Belarus), Polish Queen (1442-1461), wife of Wladyslaw II Jagielo (Jogaila). ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw III of Varna. ... Casimir IV Jagiellon (Polish: , Lithuanian: ; Belarusian: ; 30 November 1427 - 7 June 1492), of the House of Jagiellons, was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. ... The presumable banner of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania with the coat of arms, called Пагоня in Belarusian, Vytis in Lithuanian and Pogoń in Polish Another version of the Lithuanian banner The Grand Duchy of Lithuania ( Lithuanian: Lietuvos Didžioji Kunigaikštyst... Poland was ruled by dukes (c. ... Pillars of Giedymin Castle of Trakai KÄ™stutis (approximate English transcription [kæs. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... The term Polish-Lithuanian union (or Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth) refers to a series of acts and alliances between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania that lasted for prolonged periods of time and led to the creation of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth—the Republic of the Two... The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty originating in Lithuania, which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. ... Columns of Gediminas, symbol of the Gediminids. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...


Jogaila was the last pagan ruler of medieval Lithuania. He held the title Didysis Kunigaikštis.[5] As King of Poland, he pursued a policy of close alliances with Lithuania against the Teutonic Order. The allied victory at the Battle of Grunwald in 1410, followed by the First Peace of Toruń, secured the Polish and Lithuanian borders and marked the emergence of the Polish-Lithuanian alliance as a major European force. The reign of Władysław II Jagiełło extended Polish frontiers and is often considered the beginning of Poland's "Golden Age". This article discusses the history of Lithuania and of the Lithuanians. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Teutonic Knights, charging into battle. ... Combatants Kingdom of Poland Grand Duchy of Lithuania Teutonic Order and Mercenaries and Various Knights from the rest of Europe Commanders WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o, Vytautas the Great Ulrich von Jungingen† Strength 39,000 27,000 Casualties Unknown 8,000 dead 14,000 captured The Battle of Grunwald... Peace of ToruÅ„. The Peace of ToruÅ„ of 1411 or the First Peace of ToruÅ„ or of Thorn was a peace treaty signed on 1 February 1411 in ToruÅ„ (German: ) between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Order ending the Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic War (1409-1411) (see the Battle of Grunwald). ... Polish Golden Age reffers to the times from 15th century Jagiellon Poland to mid-17th century, when in 1648 the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was ravaged by the Chmielnicki Uprising and The Deluge and the Golden Age ended. ...

Contents

Early life

===Lithuania===What The deuce Giggity Giggity Giggity Giggity Giggity Giggity Goo Little is known of Jogaila's early life, and even his date of birth is not certain. Previously historians have given his date of birth as 1352, but some recent research suggests a later date—about 1362.[6] He was a descendant of the Gediminid dynasty and probably born in Vilnius. His parents were Algirdas, Grand Duke of Lithuania, and his second wife, Uliana, daughter of Alexander I, Grand Prince of Tver. Columns of Gediminas, symbol of the Gediminids. ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... Columns of Gediminas Algirdas (approximate English transcription [ˈaːl(É™).gır. ... Uliana Alexandrovna of Tver (Russian: ) (ca. ... Prince Alexander of Tver in Pskov, engraving by Boris Chorikov Grand Prince Alexander of Tver (Russian: ) (7 October 1301 – 29 October 1339 was a Grand Prince of Tver and, for some time, of Vladimir. ... Tvers coat of arms depicts grand ducal crown placed on a throne. ...


The Lithuania to which Jogaila succeeded in 1377 was a political entity composed of two different nationalities and two political systems: ethnic Lithuania in the north-west and the vast Ruthenian territories of former Kievan Rus', comprising lands of modern Ukraine, Belarus, and parts of western Russia.[7] At first, Jogaila—like his father, who had besieged Moscow in 1370[8]—based his rule in the southern and eastern territories of Lithuania, while his uncle, Kęstutis, the duke of Trakai, continued to rule the north-western region.[9] Jogaila's succession, however, soon placed this system of dual rule under strain.[4] Ruthenia is a name applied to parts of Eastern Europe which were populated by Eastern Slavic peoples, as well as to various states that existed in this territory in the past. ... Trydent of Yaroslav I Map of the Kievan Rus′, 11th century Capital Kiev Religion Orthodox Christianity Government Monarchy Historical era Middle Ages  - Established 9th century  - Disestablished 12th century Currency Hryvnia Kievan Rus′ was the early, predominantly East Slavic[1] medieval state of Rurikid dynasty dominated by the city of Kiev... Location Ethnographic region AukÅ¡taitija County Vilnius County Municipality Trakai district municipality Elderate Trakai elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Trakai district municipality Trakai elderate Population (rank) 5,504 in 2005 (56th) First mentioned 1337 Granted city rights 1409 The reconstructed Trakai Island Castle Trakai (Polish: ) is...


At the start of his reign, Jogaila was preoccupied with unrest in the Lithuanian Rus' lands. In 1377–78, for example, his own half-brother, the russified Andrii the Hunchback, prince of Polotsk, manoeuvred to secede to Moscow.[10] In 1380, Andrii and another brother, Dmytro, sided with Prince Dmitri of Moscow against Jogaila's alliance with the Tatar Khan Mamai.[11] Jogaila failed to arrive with his troops in time to support Mamai,[10] who was defeated by Prince Dmitri at the Battle of Kulikovo, after which the principality of Moscow posed a heightened threat to Lithuania. In the same year, Jogaila began a struggle for supremacy with Kęstutis. Polatsk (Belarusian: По́лацак, По́лацк, also spelt as Polacak; Polish: PoÅ‚ock; Russian: По́лоцк, also transliterated as Polotsk, Polotzk, Polock) is the most historic city in Belarus, situated on the Dvina river. ... Statue of Dmitri Donskoi (1862). ... Mamai (or Mamay) was a powerful military commander of Golden Horde in the 1370s, who resided in the western part of this nomadic state, which is now the Southern Ukrainian Steppes and the Crimean Peninsula. ... Combatants Combined Russian armies The Golden Horde Commanders Dmitri Ivanovich of Moscow Mamai Strength between 60,000 and 80,000 between 75,000 and 125,000 Casualties up to 40,000 killed or wounded Almost entire army killed The Battle of Kulikovo (Russian: ) was fought by the Tartaro-Mongols (the...


In the north-west, Lithuania faced constant armed incursions from the monastic state of the Teutonic Order—founded after 1226 to fight and convert the pagan Baltic tribes of Prussians, Yotvingians and Lithuanians—which had established itself as a centralised regional power. In 1380, Jogaila secretly concluded the Treaty of Dovydiškės with the Order, in which he agreed to the Christianisation of Lithuania in return for the Order's backing against Kęstutis;[4] but Kęstutis discovered the plan, seized Vilnius, overthrew Jogaila, and pronounced himself grand duke in his place.[12] Teutonic Knights, charging into battle. ... The Prussian people, or (old) Prussians, were Indo-European Balts inhabiting the area around the Curonian and Vistula Lagoons (i. ... Categories: Baltic peoples | Stub ... The Treaty of DovydiÅ¡kÄ—s (Lithuanian: DovydiÅ¡kių sutartis) was a secret peace treaty signed on May 31, 1380 between Jogaila, the Grand Duke of Lithuania and later King of Poland, and Winrich von Kniprode, the Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights. ... The fresco in the Vilnius Cathedral, dating to the Christianization of Lithuania The Christianization of Lithuania (Lithuanian: ) was the event that took place in 1387, initiated by the Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland Jogaila with his cousin Vytautas, that signified the official adoption of Christianity by Lithuanians...

In 1382, Jogaila raised an army from his father's vassals and confronted Kęstutis near Trakai. Kęstutis and his son Vytautas, under a promise of safe conduct from Skirgaila, Jogaila's brother, entered Jogaila's encampment in Vilnius for negotiations but were tricked and imprisoned in the castle of Kreva, where Kęstutis was found dead, probably murdered, a week later.[13] Vytautas escaped to the Teutonic fortress of Marienburg and was baptised there under the name Wigand.[12] Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The statue. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ... This article is about the state. ... Vytautas the Great - engraving of XVI ct. ... Pillars of Giedymin Castle of Trakai Skirgiello (Skirhajla, Skirgaila, Iwan; ca 1354 – 11 January 1397 Kijow; baptized 1383/1384) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania 1386 – 1392, Prince of Trakai, 1382 – 1395, Polatsk 1387 - 1397, Kiev 1395 – 1397, regent of Lithuania 1392 - 1401. ... Kreva (Belarusian: , Lithuanian: , Polish: ) is a town in Belarus, near the border of Lithuania and Belarus. ... Malbork Castle 2003. ...


Jogaila conducted further talks with the Order, renewing his promises of Christianisation and granting the Knights an area of Samogitia up to the Dubysa river. The Knights, however, pretending to assist both cousins at once, entered Lithuania in summer 1383 and seized most of Samogitia, opening a corridor between Teutonic Prussia and Teutonic Livonia further north. Having taken arms with the Knights, Vytautas then accepted assurances from Jogaila about his inheritance and joined him in attacking and looting several Prussian castles.[14] Etnographic regions of Lithuania. ... Dubysa, at 131 km, is the 15th longest river in Lithuania. ... Map of the Livonian Confederation, showing the territories of the Order in 1260 Capital Fellin (Viljandi) Language(s) Low German Religion Roman Catholicism Government Principality Master of the Livonian Order  - 1204–09 Wenno von Rohrbach  - 1209–36 Volquin  - 1237–38 Hermann Balk¹  - 1559–61 Gotthard Kettler¹ Historical era Middle Ages...


Baptism and marriage

See also: Jadwiga of Poland

When the time came for Jogaila to choose a wife, it became clear that he intended to marry a Christian. His Russian mother urged him to marry Sofia, daughter of Prince Dmitri of Moscow, who required him first to convert to Orthodoxy.[15] That option, however, was unlikely to halt the crusades against Lithuania by the Teutonic Order, who regarded Orthodox Christians as schismatics and little better than heathens.[12][4] This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... Statue of Dmitri Donskoi (1862). ...

Wawel Cathedral's towers
Wawel Cathedral's towers

Jogaila chose therefore to accept a Polish proposal to become a Catholic and marry the eleven-year-old Queen Jadwiga of Poland.[16][17] He was also to be legally adopted by Jadwiga's mother, Elisabeth of Hungary, so retaining the throne in the event of Jadwiga's death.[12] On these and other terms, on 14 August 1385 at the castle of Kreva, Jogaila agreed to adopt Christianity, repatriate lands "stolen" from Poland by its neighbours, and terras suas Lithuaniae et Russiae Coronae Regni Poloniae perpetuo applicare, a clause interpreted by historians to mean anything from a personal union between Lithuania and Poland to a prenuptial agreement superseded when the marriage took place.[18] The agreement at Krėva has been described both as far-sighted and as a desperate gamble.[19] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 156 KB) Wawel Cathedrals Towers Wieże Katedry Wawelskiej File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jogaila Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 156 KB) Wawel Cathedrals Towers Wieże Katedry Wawelskiej File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jogaila Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... This article is about the 14th-century queen and saint. ... St. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1385 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... The Union of Krewo[1], also known as KrÄ—va Act[2] (other names Union of Krevo, Act of Kreva) was a set of promises of Jogaila, Grand Duke of Lithuania for marriage between him and the underage reigning Queen Jadwiga of Poland. ...


Jogaila was duly baptised at the Wawel Cathedral in Kraków on 15 February 1386 and from then on formally used the name Władysław or Latin versions of it.[20] An official declaration of the baptism was sent to Grand Master Ernst von Zöllner, who had declined an invitation to become the new Christian's godfather, at the Order's capital, Marienburg.[21] The royal baptism triggered the conversion of most of Jogaila's court and knights, as well as mass baptisms in Lithuanian rivers,[22] a beginning of the final Christianization of Lithuania. Though the ethnic Lithuanian nobility were the main converts to Catholicism—both paganism and the Orthodox rite remained strong among the peasants—the king's conversion and its political implications created lasting repercussions for the history of both Lithuania and Poland.[22] Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Grand Master is the typical title of the supreme head (in some national orders below the Sovereign Head of state) of various orders of knighthood, including military orders, various religious orders, and some sectarian orders such as the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Orange Order. ... Konrad III Zöllner von Rotenstein was the 24th Grand Master of the Teutonic Order between 1382 and 1390. ...


Reception in Poland

Cross of Jagiellons, Władysław's personal insignia, acquired after his marriage
Cross of Jagiellons, Władysław's personal insignia, acquired after his marriage

Before Władysław's arrival in Kraków for the wedding, Queen Jadwiga despatched one of her knights, Zawisza the Red, to confirm that her future husband was really a human, as she had heard he was a bear-like creature, cruel and uncivilised.[23] Despite her misgivings, the marriage went ahead on 4 March 1386, two weeks after the baptism ceremonies, and Jogaila was crowned King Władysław. In time, the Poles discovered their new ruler to be a civilised monarch with a high regard for Christian culture, as well as a skilled politician and military commander. An athletic man, with small, restless, black eyes and big ears,[24] Władysław dressed modestly and was said to be an unusually clean person, who washed and shaved every day, never touched alcohol, and drank only pure water.[23][25] His pleasures included listening to Ruthenian fiddlers and hunting.[26] Some medieval chroniclers attributed such model behaviour to Wladyslaw's conversion.[27] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Zawisza Czerwony aka Zawisza OleÅ›nicki (died 1433; Zawisza the Red aka Zawisza of OleÅ›nica) was a Polish mediaeval knight and member of Polands royal administration. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1386 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


Ruler of Lithuania and Poland

Jadwiga's sarcophagus, Wawel Cathedral
Jadwiga's sarcophagus, Wawel Cathedral

Władysław and Jadwiga reigned as co-monarchs; and though Jadwiga probably had little real power, she took an active part in Poland's political and cultural life. In 1387, she led two successful military expeditions to Red Ruthenia, recovered lands her father had transferred from Poland to Hungary, and secured the homage of Petru I, Voivode of Moldavia.[28] In 1390, she also personally opened negotiations with the Teutonic Order. Most political responsibilities, however, fell to Władysław, with Jadwiga attending to the cultural and charitable activities for which she is still revered.[28] Download high resolution version (896x672, 63 KB)Sarcophagus of Saint Hedwig, Queen of Poland in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland. ... Download high resolution version (896x672, 63 KB)Sarcophagus of Saint Hedwig, Queen of Poland in the Wawel Cathedral, Kraków, Poland. ... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Louis the Great. ... Petru I MuÅŸat was Voivode of Moldavia from 1375 to 1391, the son of Costea MuÅŸat, the first ruler from the MuÅŸatin family. ...


Soon after Władysław's accession to the Polish throne, Władysław granted Vilnius a city charter like that of Kraków, modelled on the Magdeburg Law; and Vytautas issued a privilege to a Jewish commune of Trakai on almost the same terms as privileges issued to the Jews of Poland in the reigns of Boleslaus the Pious and Casimir the Great.[29] Władysław's policy of unifying the two legal systems was partial and uneven at first but achieved a lasting influence.[28][30] Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... The Magdeburg Rights (or Magdeburg law) were the laws of the Imperial Free City of Magdeburg during many centuries of the Holy Roman Empire, and possibly the most important set of Germanic medieval city laws. ... Location Ethnographic region AukÅ¡taitija County Vilnius County Municipality Trakai district municipality Elderate Trakai elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Trakai district municipality Trakai elderate Population (rank) 5,504 in 2005 (56th) First mentioned 1337 Granted city rights 1409 The reconstructed Trakai Island Castle Trakai (Polish: ) is... Boleslaus the Pious (born between 1221-1227, died 14 April 1279), was a duke of Greater Poland (provinces of Poznan, Kalisz, and Gniezno). ... Casimir the Great Casimir III or the Great (Kazimierz Wielki), (1310-1370), King of Poland , son of Władyslaw I Łokietek (Wladyslaw the Elbow High), 1305-1333 and Jadwiga. ...


One effect of Władysław's measures was to be the advancement of Catholics in Lithuania at the expense of Orthodox elements; in 1387 and 1413, for example, Lithuanian Catholic boyars were granted special judicial and political privileges denied the Orthodox boyars.[31] As this process gained momentum, it was accompanied by the rise of both Rus' and Lithuanian identity in the fifteenth century.[32]


Challenges

Władysław's baptism entirely failed to end the crusade of the Teutonic Knights, who claimed his conversion was a sham, perhaps even a heresy, and renewed their incursions on the pretext that pagans remained in Lithuania.[12][33] From now on, however, the Order found it harder to sustain the cause of a crusade and faced the growing threat to its existence posed by a genuinely Christian Lithuania.[34][35] Image File history File links Vytautas_the_great. ... Image File history File links Vytautas_the_great. ... Vytautas the Great - engraving of XVI ct. ...


If anything, Władysław and Jadwiga's policy of Catholicising Lithuania served to antagonise rather than disarm their Teutonic rivals. They sponsored the creation of the diocese of Vilnius under bishop Andrzej Wasilko, the former confessor of Elisabeth of Hungary. The bishopric, which included Samogitia, then largely controlled by the Teutonic Order, was subordinated to the see of Gniezno and not to that of Teutonic Königsberg.[12] The decision may not have improved Władysław's relations with the Order, but it served to introduce closer ties between Lithuania and Poland, enabling the Polish church to freely assist its Lithuanian counterpart.[22] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bishops of Vilnius (Vilna, Wilno) diocese from 1388 and archdiocese (archdiocese of Vilnius) from 1925: This article incorporates text translated from the corresponding Polish Wikipedia article as of 23 December 2006. ... Andrzej JastrzÄ™biec, also known as Andrzej Wasilko or Andrzej Polak (died 1398) was a Polish Catholic priest and diplomat, a first bishop of Seret and of Vilnius. ... St. ... Gniezno (pronounced: [gɲȋεznÉ”]) is a town in central-western Poland, some 50 km east of PoznaÅ„, inhabited by about 73,000 people. ... Former German name of the city of Kaliningrad. ...


In 1390, Władysław's rule in Lithuania faced a revived challenge from Vytautas, who resented the power given to Skirgaila in Lithuania at the expense of his own patrimony.[14] On 4 September 1390, the joint forces of Vytautas and the Teutonic Grand Master, Konrad von Wallenrode, laid siege to Vilnius, which was held by Władysław's regent Skirgaila with combined Polish, Lithuanian and Ruthenian troops.[4][36] Although the Knights, "with all their powder shot away", lifted the siege of the castle after a month, they reduced much of the outer city to ruins.[37] This bloody conflict was eventually brought to a temporary halt in 1392 with the secret Treaty of Ostrów, by which Władysław handed over the government of Lithuania to his cousin in exchange for peace: Vytautas was to rule Lithuania as a grand duke until his death, under the overlordship of a supreme prince or duke in the person of the Polish monarch.[38] Vytautas accepted his new status but continued to demand Lithuania's complete separation from Poland.[39][28] Pillars of Giedymin Castle of Trakai Skirgiello (Skirhajla, Skirgaila, Iwan; ca 1354 – 11 January 1397 Kijow; baptized 1383/1384) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania 1386 – 1392, Prince of Trakai, 1382 – 1395, Polatsk 1387 - 1397, Kiev 1395 – 1397, regent of Lithuania 1392 - 1401. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Births December 27 - Anne de Mortimer, claimant to the English throne (died 1411) Domenico da Piacenza, Italian dancemaster (died 1470) John Dunstable, English composer (died 1453) Engelbrekt Engelbrektsson, Swedish statesman and rebel leader (died 1436) Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester (died 1447) John VIII Palaeologus Byzantine Emperor (died 1448) Deaths... Konrad IV von Wallenrode (born between 1330 and 1340, died 23 July 1393) came from a family with a rich knightly tradition that had its roots in Franken and had resided in Schwabach, south of Nürnberg. ... Vytautas the Great, 17th century painting Presumed image of Jogaila, painted around 1475–1480, Kraków, Poland Ostrów / Astrava Agreement or Treaty of (Lithuanian: , Polish: ) was a treaty between Jogaila (WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o), King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, and his cousin Vytautas the...

Lithuania and Poland, ca. 1400.
Lithuania and Poland, ca. 1400.

This protracted period of war between the Lithuanians and the Teutonic Knights was ended on 12 October 1398 by the treaty of Sallinwerder, named after the islet in the Neman River where it was signed. Lithuania agreed to cede Samogitia and assist the Teutonic Order in a campaign to seize Pskov, while the Order agreed to assist Lithuania in a campaign to seize Novgorod.[28] Shortly afterwards, Vytautas was crowned as a king by local nobles; but the following year his forces and those of his ally, Khan Tokhtamysh of the White Horde, were crushed by the Timurids at the Battle of the Vorskla River, ending his imperial ambitions in the east and obliging him to submit to Władysław's protection once more.[4][39] Image File history File links Poland_and_and_Lithuania_under_Jogaila_(Wladyslaw_II_Jagiello). ... Image File history File links Poland_and_and_Lithuania_under_Jogaila_(Wladyslaw_II_Jagiello). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ... The Neman (Belarusian: ; Lithuanian: ; Russian: ; Polish: ; German: ) is a major Eastern European river rising in Belarus and flowing through Lithuania before draining into the Baltic Sea near KlaipÄ—da. ... The Trinity Cathedral (1682-99) is a symbol of Pskovs former might and independence. ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... Tokhtamysh (d. ... The White Horde was a the name of a Mongolian state of the 14th century. ... Timurid Dynasty at its Greatest Extent The Timurids were a Central Asian Sunni Muslim Turco-Mongol dynasty whose empire included the whole of Central Asia and parts of modern Iran and modern Turkey, as well as large parts of Mesopotamia and Caucasus. ... Combatants Golden Horde Lithuania, Poland, Moldavia Tokhtamysh forces Commanders Edigu, Temur Qutlugh â€  Grand Duke Vytautas, Tokhtamysh Strength ~200 000 ~75 000, 500 of them - Teutonic knights Casualties Unknown Unknown (Reportedly very heavy) (11 Teutonic Knights including Hanus and Thomas Surville) The Battle of the Vorskla River was one of the...


King of Poland

On 22 June 1399, Jadwiga gave birth to a daughter, baptised Elżbieta Bonifacja; but within a month both mother and baby were dead from birth complications, leaving the fifty-year-old king sole ruler of Poland and without an heir. Jadwiga's death, and with it the extinction of the Angevin line, undermined Władysław's right to the throne; and as a result old conflicts between the nobility of Lesser Poland, generally sympathetic to Władysław, and the gentry of Greater Poland began to surface. In 1402, Władysław answered the rumblings against his rule by marrying Anna of Celje, a grand-daughter of Casimir III of Poland, a political match which re-legitimised his monarchy. is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 30 - Accession of Henry IV of England October 13 - Coronation of Henry IV of England November 1 - Accession of John VI, Duke of Brittany Births William Canynge, English merchant (approximate date; died 1474) Zara Yaqob, Emperor of Ethiopia (died 1468) Deaths January 4 - Nicolau Aymerich, Catalan theologian and... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Kraków Katowice WrocÅ‚aw Łódź PoznaÅ„ Bydgoszcz Lublin BiaÅ‚ystok GdaÅ„sk Szczecin Warsaw M A S O V I A S I L E S I A G R E A T E R P O L A N D L E S S E R P O... Voivodship wielkopolskie since 1999 Coat of Arms for voivodship wielkopolskie Greater Poland (also Great Poland; Polish: , German: Großpolen, Latin: Polonia Maior) is a historical region of west-central Poland. ... Anna of Celje (1386-1416) was Queen consort of Poland and grand duchess of Lithuania, 1402-16 as second wife of Jogaila WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw JagieÅ‚Å‚o of Poland and Lithuania (reigned 1377-1434). ... Noble Family or Dynasty Piast dynasty Coat of Arms Piast Eagle Parents WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw I the Elbow-high, Jadwiga Kaliszka, of Gniezno and Greater Poland Consorts Aldona Ona, Adelheid of Hesse, Christina, Jadwiga of Glogow and Sagan Children 5 daughters Date of Birth 1310 Place of Birth Kowal Date...


The Union of Vilnius and Radom of 1401 confirmed Vytautas's status as grand duke under Władysław's overlordship, while assuring the title of grand duke to the heirs of Władysław rather than those of Vytautas: should Władysław die without heirs, the Lithuanian boyars were to elect a new monarch.[40][41] Since no heir had yet been produced by either monarch, the act's implications were unforeseeable, but it forged bonds between the Polish and Lithuanian nobility and a permanent defensive alliance between the two states, strengthening Lithuania's hand for a new war against the Teutonic Order in which Poland officially took no part.[34][39] While the document left the liberties of the Polish nobles untouched, it granted increased power to the boyars of Lithuania, whose grand dukes had till then been unencumbered by checks and balances of the sort attached to the Polish monarchy. The Union of Vilnius and Radom therefore earned Władysław support in Lithuania at the expense of Vytautas.[28] The Union of Vilnius and Radom was a set of acts passed in 1401 in Vilnius, Lithuania, and confirmed in Radom later the same year. ... A boyar (also spelled bojar, Romanian: ) was a member of the highest rank of the feudal Bulgarian, Romanian, and Russian aristocracy, second only to the ruling princes, from the 10th century through the 17th century. ... Defensive alliance is a type of a diplomatic union, in which both sides agree to certain actions in case one of the sides is attacked by a third party. ...


In late 1401, the new war against the Order overstretched the resources of the Lithuanians, who found themselves fighting on two fronts after uprisings in the eastern provinces. Another of Władysław's brothers, the malcontent Švitrigaila, chose this moment to stir up revolts behind the lines and declare himself grand duke.[33] On 31 January 1402, he presented himself in Marienburg, where he won the backing of the Knights with concessions similar to those made by Jogaila and Vytautas during earlier leadership contests in the Grand Duchy.[40] Pillars of Giedymin (Gedimino stulpai) Å vitrigaila (alternative spellings: ÅšwidrygieÅ‚Å‚o, Svitrigaylo, Svidryhajla, Svidrigailo, Swidrigailo; BolesÅ‚aw; ca 1370 – 10 February 1452 Łuck) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania during 1430 - 1432, Prince of Witebsk 1392 – 1393, 1430 – 1436, Podolia 1400 – 1402, Novhorod-Siversky 1404 – 1408, 1420 – 1438, Czernichow 1419 – 1430... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events September 14 - Battle of Homildon Hill. ... Malbork Castle 2003. ...


Defeat

Władysław II Jagiełło's royal seal
Władysław II Jagiełło's royal seal

The war ended in defeat for Władysław. On 22 May 1404 in the Treaty of Raciąż, he acceded to most of the Order's demands, including the formal cession of Samogitia, and agreed to support the Order's designs on Pskov; in return, Konrad von Jungingen undertook to sell Poland the disputed Dobrzyń Land and the town of Złotoryja, once pawned to the Order by Władysław Opolski, and to support Vytautas in a revived attempt on Novgorod.[40] Both sides had practical reasons for signing the treaty at that point: the Order needed time to fortify its newly acquired lands, the Poles and Lithuanians to deal with territorial challenges in the east and in Silesia. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1932, 1160 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jogaila Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1932, 1160 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jogaila Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events June 14 - Owain Glyndwr of Wales allies with the French against the English and the Henry of Lancaster. ... The Trinity Cathedral (1682-99) is a symbol of Pskovs former might and independence. ... Konrad von Jungingen (born 1355 in Swabia - died 30 March 1407 in Marienburg) was the 25th Grand Master of the Teutonic Order from 1393 to 1407. ... DobrzyÅ„ Land (Polish: ; German: ) is the territory surrounding DobrzyÅ„ nad WisÅ‚Ä… in Poland. ... ZÅ‚otoryja (Latin: Aureus Mons, Aurum, German: ) is a town in Lower Silesian Voivodeship, southwestern Poland. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw Opolski (1225-1282), Duke of Kalisz (1234-1244), Duke of WieluÅ„ (1234-1249), Duke of Opole and Racibórz since 1246. ... Velikiy Novgorod (Russian: ) is the foremost historic city of North-Western Russia, situated on the M10(E95) federal highway connecting Moscow and St. ... Silesia (English pronunciation [], Czech: ; German: ; Latin: ; Polish: ; Silesian: Åšlůnsk) is a historical region in central Europe, located along the upper and middle Oder River, upper Vistula River, and along the Sudetes, Carpathian (Silesian Beskids) mountain range. ...


Also in 1404, Władysław held talks at Vratislav with Wenceslaus IV of Bohemia, who offered to return Silesia to Poland if Władysław would support him in his power struggle within the Holy Roman Empire.[42] Władysław turned the deal down with the agreement of both Polish and Silesian nobles, unwilling to burden himself with new military commitments in the west.[43] Motto: Miasto spotkaÅ„ (the meeting place) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Lower Silesian Powiat city county Gmina WrocÅ‚aw Established 10th century City Rights 1262 Government  - Mayor RafaÅ‚ Dutkiewicz Area  - City 292. ... Wenceslaus (German: Wenzel, Czech: Václav IV; sometimes known as the Drunkard) (February 26, 1361 – August 16, 1419), of the house of Luxembourg, was king of Bohemia from 1378 to his death; until 1400, he also headed the Holy Roman Empire (as King of the Romans), and he continued to... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic war

Main articles: Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic War and Battle of Grunwald
Władysław II Jagiełło by Jan Matejko
Władysław II Jagiełło by Jan Matejko

In December 1408, Władysław and Vytautas held strategic talks in Navahrudak, where they decided to foment a revolt against Teutonic rule in Samogitia to draw German forces away from Pomerelia. Władysław promised to repay Vytautas for his support by restoring Samogitia to Lithuania in any future peace treaty.[44] The uprising, which began in May 1409, at first provoked little reaction from the Knights, who had not yet consolidated their rule in Samogitia by building castles; but by June their diplomats were busy lobbying Władysław's court at Oborniki, warning his nobles against Polish involvement in a war between Lithuania and the Order.[45] Władysław, however, bypassed his nobles and informed new Grand Master Ulrich von Jungingen that if the Knights acted to suppress Samogitia, Poland would intervene. This stung the Order into issuing a declaration of war against Poland on August 6, which Władysław received on August 14 in Nowy Korczyn.[45] Grunwald, painted by Wojciech Kossak. ... Combatants Kingdom of Poland Grand Duchy of Lithuania Teutonic Order and Mercenaries and Various Knights from the rest of Europe Commanders WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o, Vytautas the Great Ulrich von Jungingen† Strength 39,000 27,000 Casualties Unknown 8,000 dead 14,000 captured The Battle of Grunwald... Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Ladislaus II Jagiello of Poland File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jan Matejko , self-portrait. ... Flag of Navahrudak Navahrudak (Belarusian: ; Russian: ; Polish: ; Lithuanian: ) is a city in the Hrodna voblast of Western Belarus. ... Pomerelia (German: ) is a historical region in northern Poland. ... Oborniki is a town in Poland, in Wielkopolska Voivodship, about 30 km north of PoznaÅ„. It is the capital of Oborniki County. ... Ulrich von Jungingen Ulrich von Jungingen (born 1360 in Jungingen– died July 15, 1410 near Tannenberg) was the 26th Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, as successor to his elder brother Konrad von Jungingen. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Nowy Korczyn (50°18´ / 20°49´) also known as Khadash, Nayshtut, Neustadt, Novi Kochin and Novi Kortchin, known formerly as Nowe Miasto Korczyn, is a village at the mouth of Nida river, where it meets the Wistula river in Busko-Zdrój County, Świętokrzyskie Voivodship, Poland. ...


The castles guarding the northern border were in such bad condition that the Knights easily captured those at Złotoryja, Dobrzyń and Bobrowniki, the capital of Dobrzyń Land, while German burghers invited them into Bydgoszcz. Władysław arrived on the scene in late September, retook Bydgoszcz within a week, and signed a ceasefire on October 8. During the winter, the two armies prepared for a major confrontation. Władysław installed a strategic supply depot at Płock in Masovia and had a pontoon bridge constructed and transported north down the Vistula.[46] Golub-DobrzyÅ„ is a town in Poland. ... Bobrowniki is a village in Poland, located in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, in the powiat of Lipnów. ... DobrzyÅ„ Land (Polish: ; German: ) is the territory surrounding DobrzyÅ„ nad WisÅ‚Ä… in Poland. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Motto: Virtute et labore angere Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina PÅ‚ock Established 9th century City Rights 1237 Government  - Mayor MirosÅ‚aw Milewski Area  - Total 88. ... Historical division of Masovia Masovia (Polish: Mazowsze) is a geographical and historical region situated in central Poland with its capital at Warsaw. ... Pontoon bridge across the James River at Richmond, Virginia, 1865. ... For other uses, see Vistula (disambiguation). ...


Meanwhile, both sides unleashed diplomatic offensives. The Knights despatched letters to the monarchs of Europe, preaching their usual crusade against the heathens;[47] Władysław countered with his own letters to the monarchs, accusing the Order of planning to conquer the whole world.[48] Such appeals successfully recruited many foreign knights to each side. Wenceslas IV of Bohemia signed a defensive treaty with the Poles against the Teutonic Order; his brother, Sigismund of Luxembourg, allied himself with the Order and declared war against Poland on July 12, though his Hungarian vassals refused his call to arms.[49][50] Wenceslaus (German: Wenzel, Czech: Václav IV; sometimes known as the Drunkard) (February 26, 1361 – August 16, 1419), of the house of Luxembourg, was king of Bohemia from 1378 to his death; until 1400, he also headed the Holy Roman Empire (as King of the Romans), and he continued to... Sigismund, aged approximately 50, depicted by unknown artist in the 1420s — the only contemporary portrait. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Battle of Grunwald

Battle of Grunwald, 1410. Painting by Jan Matejko
Battle of Grunwald, 1410. Painting by Jan Matejko

When the war resumed in June 1410, Władysław advanced into the Teutonic heartland at the head of an army of about 20,000 mounted nobles, 15,000 armed commoners, and 2,000 professional cavalry mainly hired from Bohemia. After crossing the Vistula over the pontoon bridge at Czerwińsk, his troops met up with those of Vytautas, whose 11,000 light cavalry included Ruthenians and Tatars.[51] The Teutonic Order's army numbered about 18,000 cavalry, mostly Germans and 5,000 infantry. On July 15, at the Battle of Grunwald,[52] after one of the largest and most ferocious battles of the Middle Ages,[53] the allies won a victory so overwhelming that the Teutonic Order's army was virtually annihilated, with most of its key commanders killed in combat, including Grand Master Ulrich von Jungingen and Grand Marshal Friedrich von Wallenrode. Thousands of troops were reported to have been slaughtered on either side.[54] This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Combatants Kingdom of Poland Grand Duchy of Lithuania Teutonic Order and Mercenaries and Various Knights from the rest of Europe Commanders WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o, Vytautas the Great Ulrich von Jungingen† Strength 39,000 27,000 Casualties Unknown 8,000 dead 14,000 captured The Battle of Grunwald... Façade of the romanesque church CzerwiÅ„sk nad WisÅ‚Ä… is a village in Poland, located on the Vistula, near PÅ‚oÅ„sk. ... Vytautas the Great - engraving of XVI ct. ... This article is about the people. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Kingdom of Poland Grand Duchy of Lithuania Teutonic Order and Mercenaries and Various Knights from the rest of Europe Commanders WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o, Vytautas the Great Ulrich von Jungingen† Strength 39,000 27,000 Casualties Unknown 8,000 dead 14,000 captured The Battle of Grunwald... Ulrich von Jungingen Ulrich von Jungingen (born 1360 in Jungingen– died July 15, 1410 near Tannenberg) was the 26th Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, as successor to his elder brother Konrad von Jungingen. ...

The Teutonic Order's castle at Marienburg
The Teutonic Order's castle at Marienburg

The road to the Teutonic capital Marienburg now lay open, the city undefended; but for reasons the sources do not explain, Władysław hesitated to pursue his advantage.[55] On July 17, his army began a laboured advance, arriving at Marienburg only on July 25, by which time the new Grand Master, Heinrich von Plauen, had organised a defence of the fortress.[56][57] The apparent half-heartedness of the ensuing siege, called off by Władysław on September 19, has been ascribed variously to the impregnability of the fortifications, to high casualty figures among the Lithuanians, and to Władysław's unwillingness to risk further casualties; but a lack of sources precludes a definitive explanation. Paweł Jasienica, in his monumental Polska Jagiellonów (Poland of the Jagiellons) suggests Władysław, as a Lithuanian, might have wished to preserve the equilibrium between Lithuania and Poland, the Lithuanians having suffered particularly heavy casualties in the battle.[58] Other historians point out that Władysław might have assumed Marienburg was impregnable and therefore seen no advantage in a lengthy siege with no guarantee of success.[59] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... There are many fortresses, castles, and towns of this name. ... Heinrich V von Plauen (born circa 1370 in Lochstädt, near Königsberg - died 1429 in Lochstädt) was the 27th Grand Master of the Teutonic Order. ... PaweÅ‚ Jasienica was the pen-name of Leon Lech Beynar (November 10, 1909 – August 19, 1970), a Polish amateur historian, journalist, writer, soldier. ...


Final years

Dissent

Polish and Lithuanian conflict with Teutonic Prussia, 1377–1434.
Polish and Lithuanian conflict with Teutonic Prussia, 1377–1434.

The war ended in 1411 with the Peace of Toruń, in which neither Poland nor Lithuania drove home their negotiating advantage to the full, much to the discontent of the Polish nobles. Poland regained Dobrzyń Land, Lithuania regained Samogitia, and Masovia regained a small territory beyond the Wkra river. Most of the Teutonic Order's territory, however, including towns which had surrendered, remained intact. Władysław then proceeded to release many high-ranking Teutonic Knights and officials for apparently modest ransoms.[60] This failure to exploit the victory to his nobles' satisfaction provoked growing opposition to Władysław's regime after Toruń, further fuelled by the granting of Podolia, disputed between Poland and Lithuania, to Vytautas, and by the king's two-year absence in Lithuania.[61] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (968x834, 181 KB) The map shows the areas of conflict between Teutonic Prussia and Poland and Lithuania during the reigns of Jogaila (WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o) and Vytautas. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (968x834, 181 KB) The map shows the areas of conflict between Teutonic Prussia and Poland and Lithuania during the reigns of Jogaila (WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o) and Vytautas. ... Peace of ToruÅ„ The Peace of ToruÅ„ of 1411 or the First Peace of ToruÅ„ or of Thorn was a peace treaty signed on 1 February 1411 in ToruÅ„ (German: ) between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Order ending the Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic War (1409-1411) (see the Battle of Grunwald). ... DobrzyÅ„ Land (Polish: ; German: ) is the territory surrounding DobrzyÅ„ nad WisÅ‚Ä… in Poland. ... Wkra is a river in north-eastern Poland, a tributary of the Narew river, with a length of 249 kilometres (13th longest) and the basin area of 5,322 sq. ... Historical arms of Podilia The region of Podolia (also spelt Podilia or Podillya) is a historical region in the west-central and south-west portions of present-day Ukraine, corresponding to Khmelnytskyi Oblast and Vinnytsia Oblast. ...


A lingering Polish distrust of Władysław, who never became fluent in Polish, was expressed later in the century by the chronicler and historian Jan Długosz: Jan DÅ‚ugosz Jan DÅ‚ugosz, also known as Joannes Longinus or Joannes Dlugossius (1415-1480) was a Polish historian (a chronicler) and a secretary of Bishop Zbigniew OleÅ›nicki of Kraków. ...

He loved his country Lithuania and his family and brothers so much that without hesitation he brought to the Polish kingdom all kinds of wars and troubles. The crown's riches and all it carried he donated towards the enrichment and protection of Lithuania.[62]

In an effort to outflank his critics, Władysław promoted the leader of the opposing faction, bishop Mikołaj Trąba, to the archbishopric of Gniezno in autumn 1411 and replaced him in Kraków with Wojciech Jastrzębiec, a supporter of Vytautas.[61] He also sought to create more allies in Lithuania. In 1413, in the Union of Horodło, signed on October 2, he decreed that the status of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania was "tied to our Kingdom of Poland permanently and irreversibly" and granted the Catholic nobles of Lithuania privileges equal to those of the Polish szlachta. The act included a clause prohibiting the Polish nobles from electing a monarch without the consent of the Lithuanian nobles, and the Lithuanian nobles from electing a grand duke without the consent of the Polish monarch.[63] // MikoÅ‚aj TrÄ…ba, of TrÄ…by Coat of Arms (1358 - 2 December 1422) was a Polish Roman Catholic priest, Royal Notary from 1390, Deputy Chancellor of the Crown 1403-12, bishop of Halicz 1410-12, archbishop of Gniezno from 1412, and first primate of Poland 1417-22. ... Gniezno (pronounced: [gɲȋεznÉ”]) is a town in central-western Poland, some 50 km east of PoznaÅ„, inhabited by about 73,000 people. ... Wojciech of JastrzÄ™biec (ca. ... The Union of HorodÅ‚o was a set of acts introduced in the town of HorodÅ‚o in 1413. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... StanisÅ‚aw Antoni Szczuka, a Polish nobleman Szlachta ( ) was the noble class in Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the two countries that later jointly formed the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. ...


Last conflicts

In 1414, a sporadic new war broke out, known as the "Hunger War" from the Knights' scorched-earth tactics of burning fields and mills; but both the Knights and the Lithuanians were too exhausted from the previous war to risk a major battle, and the fighting petered out in the autumn.[61] Hostilities did not flare up again until 1419, during the Council of Constance, when they were called off at the papal legate's insistence.[61] The Hunger War was a conflict between the Kingdom of Poland and the Teutonic Knights in 1414. ... For the computer game, see Scorched Earth (computer game). ... The Council of Constance was an ecumenical council considered valid by the Roman Catholic Church. ...


The Council of Constance proved a turning point in the Teutonic crusades, as it did for several European conflicts. Vytautas sent a delegation in 1415, including the metropolitan of Kiev; and Samogitian witnesses arrived at Constance at the end of that year to point out their preference for being "baptised with water and not with blood".[64] The Polish envoys, among them Mikołaj Trąba, Zawisza Czarny, and Paweł Włodkowic, lobbied for an end to the forced conversion of heathens and to the Order's aggression against Lithuania and Poland.[65] As a result of the Polish-Lithuanian diplomacy, the council, though scandalised by Włodkowic's questioning of the monastic state's legitimacy, denied the Order's request for a further crusade and instead entrusted the conversion of the Samogitians to Poland-Lithuania.[66] // MikoÅ‚aj TrÄ…ba, of TrÄ…by Coat of Arms (1358 - 2 December 1422) was a Polish Roman Catholic priest, Royal Notary from 1390, Deputy Chancellor of the Crown 1403-12, bishop of Halicz 1410-12, archbishop of Gniezno from 1412, and first primate of Poland 1417-22. ... Zawisza the Black Zawisza Czarny z Garbowa (Zawisza the Black from Garbów, also known as The Black Knight), (c. ... PaweÅ‚ WÅ‚odkowic, Paulus Wladimiri (1370-1435) was a distinguished scholar, lawyer and the rector of the University of Cracow. ...


The diplomatic context at Constance included the revolt of the Bohemian Hussites, who looked upon Poland as an ally in their wars against Sigismund, the emperor elect and new king of Bohemia. In 1421, the Bohemian Diet declared Sigismund deposed and formally offered the crown to Władysław on condition he accept the religious principles of the Four Articles of Prague, which he was not prepared to do.[67] The Hussites comprised a Christian movement following the teachings of the reformer Jan Hus (circa 1369–1415), who was influenced by John Wyclif and became one of the forerunners of the Protestant Reformation. ... Sigismund, aged approximately 50, depicted by unknown artist in the 1420s — the only contemporary portrait. ...


In 1422, Władysław fought another war, known as the Gollub War, against the Teutonic Order, defeating them in under two months before the Order's imperial reinforcements had time to arrive. The resulting Treaty of Lake Melno ended the Knights' claims to Samogitia once and for all and defined a permanent border between Prussia and Lithuania.[68] The terms of this treaty have, however, been seen as turning a Polish victory into defeat, thanks to Władysław's renunciation of Polish claims to Pomerania, Pomerelia, and Chełmno Land, for which he received only the town of Nieszawa in return.[69] The Treaty of Lake Melno closed a chapter in the Knights' wars with Lithuania but did little to settle their long-term issues with Poland. Further sporadic warfare broke out between Poland and the Knights between 1431 and 1435. The Gollub War was a two-month war of the Teutonic Knights against the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania in 1422. ... The Treaty of Melno (German: ; Lithuanian: ; Polish: ) was a peace treaty ending the Gollub War. ... CheÅ‚mno Land or Culmland (Polish: Ziemia CheÅ‚miÅ„ska, German: Kulmerland) is a historical region in central Poland bounded by the Vistula and DrwÄ™ca rivers. ... Nieszawa is a town and a commune in the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodship, in north-central Poland. ... Polish-Teutonic War of 1431-1435) begun with the alliance between Grand Master of the Teutonic Order, Paul von Rusdorf, and Grand Duke of Lithuania, Å vitrigaila. ...


Cracks in the cooperation between Poland and Lithuania after the death of Vytautas in 1430 had offered the Knights a revived opportunity for interference in Poland. Władysław supported his brother Švitrigaila as grand duke of Lithuania,[70] but when Švitrigaila, with the support of the Teutonic Order and dissatisfied Rus' nobles,[32] rebelled against Polish overlordship in Lithuania, the Poles, under the leadership of Bishop Zbigniew Oleśnicki of Kraków, occupied Podolia, which Władysław had awarded to Lithuania in 1411, and Volhynia.[71] In 1432, a pro-Polish party in Lithuania elected Vytautas's brother Žygimantas as grand duke,[70] leading to an armed struggle over the Lithuanian succession which stuttered on for years after Władysław's death.[72] Pillars of Giedymin (Gedimino stulpai) Å vitrigaila (alternative spellings: ÅšwidrygieÅ‚Å‚o, Svitrigaylo, Svidryhajla, Svidrigailo, Swidrigailo; BolesÅ‚aw; ca 1370 – 10 February 1452 Łuck) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania during 1430 - 1432, Prince of Witebsk 1392 – 1393, 1430 – 1436, Podolia 1400 – 1402, Novhorod-Siversky 1404 – 1408, 1420 – 1438, Czernichow 1419 – 1430... Zbigniew OleÅ›nicki Zbigniew OleÅ›nicki (1389 - 1455) was a first Polish cardinal, bishop of Kraków, undercancellor of the Crown and statesman . ... Historical arms of Podilia The region of Podolia (also spelt Podilia or Podillya) is a historical region in the west-central and south-west portions of present-day Ukraine, corresponding to Khmelnytskyi Oblast and Vinnytsia Oblast. ... Volhynia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: ; also called Volynia) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Prypiat and Western Bug -- to the north of Galicia and of Podolia. ... Columns of Gediminas Trakai Island Castle Sigismund I Kestutian (Belarusian: , Lithuanian: , Polish: ; born after 1350, murdered 20 March 1440 in Trakai) was the Grand Prince of Lithuania from 1432 to 1440. ...


Succession

Tomb effigy of Władysław II Jagiello, Wawel Cathedral
Tomb effigy of Władysław II Jagiello, Wawel Cathedral

Władysław's second wife, Anna of Celje, had died in 1416, leaving a daughter, Jadwiga. In 1417, Władysław married Elisabeth of Pilica, who died in 1420 without bearing him a child, and two years later, Sophia of Halshany, who rewarded him with not one but two surviving sons. The death in 1431 of Princess Jadwiga, the last heir of Piast blood, released Władysław to make his sons by Sophia of Halshany his heirs, though he had to sweeten the Polish nobles with concessions to ensure their agreement, since the monarchy was elective. Władysław finally died in 1434, in his seventies, leaving Poland to his elder son, Władysław III, and Lithuania to his younger, Casimir, both still minors at the time.[73] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1696x2272, 387 KB) Summary WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw JagieÅ‚Å‚o from tomb effigy in Kraków author-Maciej SzczepaÅ„czyk user-Mathiasrex Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1696x2272, 387 KB) Summary WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw JagieÅ‚Å‚o from tomb effigy in Kraków author-Maciej SzczepaÅ„czyk user-Mathiasrex Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral Wawel Cathedral – in full, the Cathedral Basilica of St Stanislaus and St Wenceslaus – is Polands national sanctuary. ... Jadwiga (8 April 1408 - 8 December 1431) of the House of Jagiellon was a daughter of WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o (ca. ... Elisabeth of Pilica Polish: (1372-1420) was Queen consort of Poland and Grand Duchess of Lithuania (1417-1420) as the third wife of Jogaila (or WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o) who was Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland, reigning 1387 to 1434. ... Sophia of Halshany (Lithuanian: Zofija AlÅ¡Ä—niÅ¡kÄ—; Polish: Zofia HolszaÅ„ska) (1405?-1461), Lithuanian noblewoman from Halshany (Lithuanian AlÅ¡Ä—nai, now Halshany in Belarus), Polish Queen (1442-1461), wife of Wladyslaw II Jagielo (Jogaila). ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw III of Varna. ... Casimir IV Jagiellon (Polish: , Lithuanian: ; Belarusian: ; 30 November 1427 - 7 June 1492), of the House of Jagiellons, was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. ...


Family tree (incomplete)

For more exhaustive relations see:

Main article: Family relations of Jogaila

Polish 100-zÅ‚oty This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Gediminas, duke of Lithuania - engraving of XVII ct. ... Jewna (? PoÅ‚ock – 1344) was a Ruthenian Grand Princess, daughter of Prince Iwan Polocki, wife of Giedymin. ... Prince Alexander of Tver in Pskov, engraving by Boris Chorikov Grand Prince Alexander of Tver (Russian: ) (7 October 1301 – 29 October 1339 was a Grand Prince of Tver and, for some time, of Vladimir. ... Jackdaw on the coat-of-arms of Galicia alludes to the name of Halych Halych (Russian and Ukrainian: ) is a historic town in Western Ukraine on the Dniester River. ... Columns of Gediminas Algirdas (approximate English transcription [ˈaːl(É™).gır. ... Uliana Alexandrovna of Tver (Russian: ) (ca. ... This article is about 14th century queen and saint. ... Anna of Celje (1386-1416) was Queen consort of Poland and grand duchess of Lithuania, 1402-16 as second wife of Jogaila WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw JagieÅ‚Å‚o of Poland and Lithuania (reigned 1377-1434). ... Elisabeth of Pilica Polish: (1372-1420) was Queen consort of Poland and Grand Duchess of Lithuania (1417-1420) as the third wife of Jogaila (or WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o) who was Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland, reigning 1387 to 1434. ... Sophia of Halshany (Lithuanian: Zofija AlÅ¡Ä—niÅ¡kÄ—; Polish: Zofia HolszaÅ„ska) (1405?-1461), Lithuanian noblewoman from Halshany (Lithuanian AlÅ¡Ä—nai, now Halshany in Belarus), Polish Queen (1442-1461), wife of Wladyslaw II Jagielo (Jogaila). ... Jadwiga (8 April 1408 - 8 December 1431) of the House of Jagiellon was a daughter of WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw II JagieÅ‚Å‚o (ca. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw III of Varna. ... Casimir IV Jagiellon (Polish: , Lithuanian: , Belarusian: ; 30 November 1427 - 7 June 1492), of the House of Jagiellons, was Grand Duke of Lithuania from 1440, and King of Poland from 1447, until his death. ... The Jagiellon Era 1385-1569, was dominated by the union of Poland with Lithuania under the Jagiellon Dynasty, founded by the Lithuanian grand duke Jagiello. ... History of Belarusian states can be traced far to Principality of Polatsk. ... The following is a list of Lithuanian rulers — grand dukes, kings, and presidents — when Lithuania was a sovereign state or was regarded as a separate entity (i. ... Anna Jagiellon. ... The title of Grand Duke (Latin, Magnus Dux; German, Großherzog, Russian, Великий князь) used in Slavic, Baltic, and Germanic countries, is ranked in honour below King but higher than a sovereign Duke (Herzog) or Prince (Fürst). ... The title Grand Prince (Latin, Magnus Princeps; German, Großfürst, Finnish Suuriruhtinas, Swedish Storfurste, Lithuanian Didysis kunigaikÅ¡tis, Russian Великий князь Velikii kniaz) ranks in honour below Emperor and Tsar but higher than a sovereign Prince (Fürst) or Royal Prince. ... Polatsk (Belarusian: По́лацак, По́лацк, also spelt as Polacak; Polish: PoÅ‚ock; Russian: По́лоцк, also transliterated as Polotsk, Polotzk, Polock) is the most historic city in Belarus, situated on the Dvina river. ... Location of Vitebsk, shown within the Vitebsk Voblast Coordinates: , Country Subdivision Founded 974 Government  - Mayor Population (2004)  - Total 342,381 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3) Area code(s) +375-15 License plate 2 Website: [2]] Vitebsk, also known as Vitsyebsk (Belarusian: Ві́цебск, IPA: ; Yiddish: װיטעבסק; Polish: Witebsk... A view of Smolensk in 1912. ... Volhynia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: ; also called Volynia) comprises the historic region in western Ukraine located between the rivers Prypiat and Western Bug -- to the north of Galicia and of Podolia. ... Podlasie (Latin Podlachia) is a historical region in eastern part of Poland and western Belarus. ... Historical arms of Podilia The region of Podolia (also spelt Podilia or Podillya) is a historical region in the west-central and south-west portions of present-day Ukraine, corresponding to Khmelnytskyi Oblast and Vinnytsia Oblast. ... John Meyendorff (1926-1992) was a leading Orthodox theologian, writer and teacher. ... Poland was ruled by dukes (c. ... In literature, latinisation is the practice of writing a name in a Latin style when writing in Latin so as to more closely emulate Latin authors, or to present a more impressive image. ... Noble Family or Dynasty Piast dynasty Coat of Arms Piast Eagle Parents Kazimierz I Kujawski, Eufrozyna Opolska Consorts Jadwiga Kaliska Children Stefan, WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw, Kunegunda, Elżbieta, Jadwiga, Casimir III the Great Date of Birth 1261 Place of Birth - Date of Death 1333 Place of Death Cracow Coronation January... For other monarchs with similar names, please see Ladislaus I (disambiguation). ... Henry IV (November 11, 1050–August 7, 1106) was King of Germany from 1056 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1084 until his forced abdication in 1105. ... This article is about the region in Romania. ... Jan DÅ‚ugosz Jan DÅ‚ugosz, also known as Joannes Longinus or Joannes Dlugossius (1415-1480) was a Polish historian (a chronicler) and a secretary of Bishop Zbigniew OleÅ›nicki of Kraków. ... PaweÅ‚ Jasienica was the pen-name of Leon Lech Beynar (November 10, 1909 – August 19, 1970), a Polish amateur historian, journalist, writer, soldier. ... The Union of Lublin, painted by Jan Matejko The Union of Lublin (Lithuanian: Liublino unija; Belarusian: Лю́блінская ву́нія; Polish: Unia lubelska) - signed on July 1, 1569 in Lublin, united the Kingdom of Poland and the... Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was the King of England and France and Lord of Ireland from 1399 to 1413. ... King of the Romans (Latin: Rex Romanorum) was a title used by the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire before their coronation by the Pope, and later also by the heir designate of the Empire. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Assassination of the Duke of Burgundy, John the Fearless, on the Bridge of Montereau, in 1419. ... Other languages FAQs | Table free Welcome to Wikipedia, the free-content encyclopedia that anyone can edit. ... Paweł Włodkowic, Paulus Wladimiri (1370-1435) was a distinguished scholar, lawyer and the rector of the University of Cracow. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Location Ethnographic region Samogitia County KlaipÄ—da County Municipality Palanga city municipality Elderate Number of elderates Coordinates General information Capital of Palanga city municipality Population (rank) 17,623 in 2001 (21st) First mentioned 1253 Granted city rights 1791 Gintaras Amber Museum in Palanga. ... Location Ethnographic region Lithuania minor County KlaipÄ—da County Municipality Geographic coordinate system Number of elderates 1 General Information Capital of KlaipÄ—da County KlaipÄ—da city municipality Population 187,316 in 2006 (3rd) First mentioned 1252 Granted city rights 1254 or 1258 (Lübeck); 1475 (Kulm) KlaipÄ—da ( (help... Central European University is a US-licensed and accredited university based in Budapest, Hungary. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Jan DÅ‚ugosz Jan DÅ‚ugosz, also known as Joannes Longinus or Joannes Dlugossius (1415-1480) was a Polish historian (a chronicler) and a secretary of Bishop Zbigniew OleÅ›nicki of Kraków. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... PaweÅ‚ Jasienica was the pen-name of Leon Lech Beynar (November 10, 1909 – August 19, 1970), a Polish amateur historian, journalist, writer, soldier. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kórnik Library (Polish: ) is one of the most famous Polish libraries, founded by Tytus DziaÅ‚yÅ„ski in 1828. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The building of the Ossolineum Institute in Wrocław The former building of the Ossolineum Institute in Lwów, now Ukraine. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Samuel Orgelbrand (1810-1868) was one of the most prominent Polish publishers of the 19th century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 221st day of the year (222nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

External links

Preceded by
Algirdas
Grand Duke of Lithuania
1377–1381
Succeeded by
Kęstutis
Preceded by
Kęstutis
Grand Duke of Lithuania
1382–1386
Succeeded by
Skirgaila
Preceded by
none
Supreme Duke of Lithuania
1386–1434
Succeeded by
none
Preceded by
Jadwiga
King of Poland
1386–1434
Succeeded by
Władysław III
Persondata
NAME Władysław II Jagiełło
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Jogaila
SHORT DESCRIPTION King of Poland
DATE OF BIRTH c. 1362
PLACE OF BIRTH Vilnius
DATE OF DEATH June 1, 1434
PLACE OF DEATH Gródek Jagielloński

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jogaila (1350-1434) (3434 words)
Nevertheless, according to German historian Leopold Ranke, Jogaila's decision to accept Roman Christianity via Poland vs. Eastern Orthodoxy was as significant in the history of Europe as the destruction of Kiev's Russia by the Tatars in 1240.
Jogaila, son of the Lithuanian Grand Duke Algirdas,3 was born ca.
Jogaila's relationship with Lithuania was angrily affirmed by chronicler Jan Dlugosz: "He loved his country Lithuania, and his family and brothers so much, that without hesitation he brought to the Polish kingdom all kinds of wars and troubles.
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