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Encyclopedia > Joe Paterno
Joe Paterno

Title Head coach
College Penn State
Sport Football
Conference Big Ten
Team record 372-124-3
Born December 21, 1926 (1926-12-21) (age 81)
Place of birth Brooklyn, NY
Annual salary $512,664[1]
Career highlights
Overall 372-124-3
Bowls 24-9-1 (Most all-time)
Coaching stats
College Football DataWarehouse
Championships
1982 NCAA Championship
1986 NCAA Championship
1994 Big Ten Conference Championship
2005 Big Ten Conference Championship
Awards
1972 Walter Camp Coach of the Year
1978 Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year
1981 Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award
1982 Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year
1986 SI Sportsman of the Year
1986 Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year
1986 Paul "Bear" Bryant Award
1994 Walter Camp Coach of the Year
2002 Amos Alonzo Stagg Award
2005 Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award
2005 The Home Depot Coach of the Year Award
2005 Walter Camp Coach of the Year
Playing career
1946-1950 Brown
Position QB / CB
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1950-66
1966-Present
Penn State (Assistant)
Penn State
College Football Hall of Fame, 2007

Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State University's college football team, a position he has held since 1966. Paterno, along with Chris Ault and Bobby Bowden, is one of three active coaches who have also been inducted in to the College Football Hall of Fame. Paterno has won more football games against teams currently in NCAA Division I-FBS (formerly Division I-A) than any other coach in history. He also has more bowl game wins and more FBS undefeated seasons than any other coach in college football history. Image File history File linksMetadata Joe_Paterno_Sideline_PSU-Illinois_2006. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... A school name with an asterisk following it (ex: Ohio State*) acknowledges a major recognized national championship for that season. ... A school name with an asterisk following it (ex: Ohio State*) acknowledges a major recognized national championship for that season. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the... The Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award is given annually to a college football coach by the Football Writers Association of America. ... The Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award is an annual College Football award given to the head coach whose team excels on the field, in the classroom and in the community. ... The Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award is given annually to a college football coach by the Football Writers Association of America. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... The Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award is given annually to a college football coach by the Football Writers Association of America. ... The Paul Bear Bryant Award has been given out annually since 1957 to NCAA college footballs coach of the year. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the... AFCA logo The Amos Alonzo Stagg Award is presented annually by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) to the “individual, group or institution whose services have been outstanding in the advancement of the best interests of football. ... The Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award is an annual College Football award given to the head coach whose team excels on the field, in the classroom and in the community. ... The Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award is given annually to college footballs top head coach. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... For corner back, the Gaelic football and hurling position, see Gaelic football and Hurling positions . ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... // 1 : College Football - In a game remembered for its numerous trick plays, including a hook and lateral and a Statue of Liberty play, the Boise State Broncos defeat the Oklahoma Sooners 43-42 to win the Fiesta Bowl in dramatic fashion. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state-related university. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Chris Ault (born November 8, 1946 in San Bernardino, California), is the current college football head coach of the University of Nevada Wolf Pack. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the current head college football coach of the Florida State University Seminoles. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...

Contents

Early life

Joe Paterno grew up during the Great Depression. He nearly had to leave high school because the tuition of $20 a month was such a burden for his family. In 1944, Paterno graduated from Brooklyn Prep and headed to Brown University to study and play football. At Brown he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. There, he was a capable but unspectacular quarterback and also played cornerback. He currently still shares, along with Greg Parker, the Brown University record for career interceptions with 14.[2] It was at Brown that he honed his skills as a leader, allowing him to go into coaching after graduation in 1950, joining Hall of Famer Rip Engle at Penn State as an assistant coach. Paterno thought his stint as an assistant coach would be brief, before going to law school. He never went to law school and instead became one of the most famous and recognizable coaches of any sport in the United States. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Self-publishing is the publishing of books or other media by those who have written them. ... In historical scholarship, a primary source is a document, or other source of information that was created at or near the time being studied, by an authoritative source, usually one with direct personal knowledge of the events being described. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Year 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) is the oldest secret college mens fraternity of New England origin. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... For corner back, the Gaelic football and hurling position, see Gaelic football and Hurling positions . ... In Canadian or American football, an interception occurs when a quarterbacks pass is caught by a player on the opposing team. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles A. Rip Engle (died 1983), was a Hall-of-Fame coach of The Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team. ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ...


Records and accomplishments

At age 81, Paterno is coaching his 58th season at Penn State as an assistant or head coach in 2007, holding the record for any football coach at any university. The 2007 season marks Joe Paterno’s 42nd season pacing the sidelines as head coach of the Nittany Lions, passing Amos Alonzo Stagg[3] for the most years at a single institution. The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... The Lion Shrine The Nittany Lion is the mascot of the Pennsylvania State University in State College, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Paterno's loyalty is so strong with Penn State that he turned down an offer to coach the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1969, an offer he initially seriously considered. (The Steelers ended up hiring Chuck Noll, who would win four Super Bowls with the team in a 23-year head coaching career.) In 1972 he also turned down a head coaching position with the New England Patriots which included a percentage ownership position. Steelers redirects here. ... Charles Henry Chuck Noll (born January 5, 1932) is a former American football coach, having served as the coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League from 1969 to 1991. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present...


Career record

With Penn State's latest win over Texas A&M in the 2007 Alamo Bowl, Joe Paterno has a career record of 372 wins, 124 losses, and 3 ties. Based on the criteria used by the NCAA, this means Florida State's Bobby Bowden has more victories by a Division I-FBS football coach. Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... The 2007 Texas A&M Aggies football team (often referred to as A&M or the Aggies) represents Texas A&M University in the 2007-2008 college football season. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the current head college football coach of the Florida State University Seminoles. ...


Both Paterno's and Bowden's 373 win total includes a win by forfeit. One of Bowden's wins came by forfeit in 1983 when Tulane's 34-28 victory over Florida State was reversed because of ineligible players.[4] Paterno's 373 wins includes the 1972 Sugar Bowl game, a 14-0 Oklahoma win which Oklahoma was later forced to forfeit for using ineligible players.[5] However, Paterno declined to accept the win while Bowden accepted Tulane's forfeit, so the NCAA officially recognizes that Bowden holds a one-game advantage over Paterno in the wins column.[6] This article is about an American college athletics program. ... Head Coach Bobby Bowden 31st Year, 292-80-4 Home Stadium Doak Campbell Stadium Capacity 82,300 - Grass Conference ACC - Atlantic First Year 1947 Athletic Director Dave Hart Website Seminoles. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Head coach Bob Stoops 8th year, 78–18 Home stadium Gaylord Family Oklahoma Memorial Stadium Capacity 82,112 - Grass Conference Big 12 - South First year 1895 Athletic director Joe Castiglione Website SoonerSports. ...


However, 49 of Bowden's 373 coaching victories came against schools that are not currently in Division I-FBS[7], while only 5 of Paterno's victories came against non-Division I-FBS schools[8], so that Paterno has 368 wins against teams currently in Division I-FBS while Bowden has only 324. Following a 3-overtime victory over FSU in the 2006 Orange Bowl, Paterno has a 7-1 all-time record against Bowden (6-0 against Bowden's West Virginia teams and 1-1 against Bowden's Florida State teams). Overtime is the amount of time someone works beyond normal working hours; these may be determined in several ways, by custom (what is considered healthy or reasonable by society), by practices of a given trade or profession, by legislation, or by agreement between employers and workers or their representatives. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... West Virginia University is an institution of higher learning based in Morgantown, West Virginia, USA. Other campuses include: West Virginia University at Parkersburg in Parkersburg; West Virginia University Institute of Technology in Montgomery; Potomac State College of West Virginia University in Keyser; and a clinical campus for the Universitys...

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl Coaches# AP°
Penn State Nittany Lions (Independent) (1966 – 1992)
1966 Penn State 5–5–0
1967 Penn State 8–2–1 T 17–17 Gator 11 10
1968 Penn State 11–0–0 W 15–14 Orange 3 2
1969 Penn State 11–0–0 W 10–3 Orange 2 2
1970 Penn State 7–3–0 19 18
1971 Penn State 11–1–0 W 30–6 Cotton 11 5
1972 Penn State 11–1–0 W (forfeit) 0–14 Sugar 8 10
1973 Penn State 12–0–0 W 16–9 Orange 5 5
1974 Penn State 10–2–0 W 41–20 Cotton 7 7
1975 Penn State 9–3–0 L 6–13 Sugar 10 10
1976 Penn State 7–5–0 L 9–20 Gator
1977 Penn State 11–1–0 W 42–30 Fiesta 4 5
1978 Penn State 11–1–0 L 7–14 Sugar 4 4
1979 Penn State 8–4–0 W 9–6 Liberty 18 20
1980 Penn State 10–2–0 W 31–19 Fiesta 8 8
1981 Penn State 10–2–0 W 26–10 Fiesta 3 3
1982 Penn State 11–1–0 W 27–23 Sugar 1 1
1983 Penn State 8–4–1 W 13–10 Aloha 17
1984 Penn State 6–5–0
1985 Penn State 11–1–0 L 10–25 Orange 3 3
1986 Penn State 12–0–0 W 14–10 Fiesta 1 1
1987 Penn State 8–4–0 L 10–35 Citrus
1988 Penn State 5–6–0
1989 Penn State 8–3–1 W 50–39 Holiday 14 15
1990 Penn State 9–3–0 L 17–24 Blockbuster 10 11
1991 Penn State 11–2–0 W 42–17 Fiesta 3 3
1992 Penn State 7–5–0 L 3–24 Blockbuster 24
Penn State Nittany Lions (Big Ten Conference) (1993 – present)
1993 Penn State 10–2–0 6–2–0 3rd W 31–13 Citrus 7 8
1994 Penn State 12–0–0 8–0–0 1st W 38–20 Rose 2 2
1995 Penn State 9–3–0 5–3–0 T–3rd W 43–14 Outback 12 13
1996 Penn State 11–2 6–2 T–3rd W 38–15 Fiesta 7 7
1997 Penn State 9–3 6–2 T–2nd L 6–21 Citrus 17 16
1998 Penn State 9–3 5–3 5th W 26–14 Outback 15 17
1999 Penn State 10–3 5–3 T–4th W 24–0 Alamo 11 11
2000 Penn State 5–7 4–4 T–6th
2001 Penn State 5–6 4–4 T–4th
2002 Penn State 9–4 5–3 4th L 9–13 Capital One 15 16
2003 Penn State 3–9 1–7 T–9th
2004 Penn State 4–7 2–6 9th
2005 Penn State 11–1 7–1 T–1st W 26–23 Orange 3 3
2006 Penn State 9–4 5–3 T–4th W 20–10 Outback 25 24
2007 Penn State 9–4 4–4 T–5th W 24-17 Alamo 25
Penn State: 373–124–3 73–47
Total: 373–124–3
      National Championship         Conference Title         Conference Division Title
Indicates BCS bowl game. #Rankings from final Coaches Poll of the season.
°Rankings from final AP Poll of the season.

Joe Paterno is the current head coach of Penn State Nittany Lions football. ... For the stadium, see Gator Bowl Stadium. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... For the stadium, see Gator Bowl Stadium. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season came down to a rare #1 vs. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season saw the Alabama Crimson Tide bring home a national title with a perfect 12-0 season. ... For the stadium, see Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. ... The 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Georgia take its first national title since World War II. The Georgia Bulldogs starred freshman running back Herschel Walker, who made his NCAA debut against Tennessee. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The 1981 Division 1A Football season ended with Clemson, unbeaten and untied, taking the national championship after a victory over traditional power Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The 1982 Division 1A Football season saw Paul “Bear” Bryant retire as head coach at Alabama with 323 career victories in 38 seasons. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The 1983 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the University of Miami winning a national championship. ... The Aloha Classic is a now_defunct National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I_A college football bowl game played in Honolulu, Hawaii at Aloha Stadium. ... The 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season saw an aerial attack (in a college version of the West Coast offense), as undefeated Brigham Young won the national championship as decided in an unanimous AP Poll. ... The 1985 NCAA Division I-A football season saw the rushing show up, as Oklahoma continued its rich tradition of excellence by winning another national championship. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Penn State winning the National Championship. ... 1987 Fiesta Bowl Bowl Game Miami Hurricanes at Penn State Nittany Lions Penn State Nittany Lions (12-0) 14 January 2, 1987 Sun Devil Stadium The 1987 Fiesta Bowl Game was a college football bowl game sponsored by Sunkist. ... The 1987 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Miami winning its fourth National Championship during the 80s, cementing its claim as one of the decades top teams. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... The 1988 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Notre Dame winning the National Championship. ... The 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Miami winning its third National Championship during the 80s, cementing its claim as one of the decades top teams. ... The Holiday Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, since 1978. ... The 1990 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with a split championship and the ensuing controversy led to the creation of the Bowl Coalition, a precursor to the Bowl Championship Series. ... The Champs Sports Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played in Orlando, Florida. ... The 1991 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with a split champion for the second consecutive season. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The 1992 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first year of the Bowl Coalition, and ended with Alabamas first national championship in thriteen years, their first since the departure of Bear Bryant. ... The Champs Sports Bowl is an annual college football bowl game that is played in Orlando, Florida. ... Joe Paterno is the current head coach of Penn State Nittany Lions football. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The 1993 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Florida State crowned National Champions, but not without controversy. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... The 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season saw yet another controversial finish as both Nebraska and Penn State finished undefeated, and yet Penn State finished a distant second in the final AP and UPI polls. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ... The 1996 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Florida Gators crowned National Champions, but not as unanimously as the Bowl Alliance would have hoped. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... The 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with a split championship for the third time in the 1990s. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... The 1998 NCAA Division I-A football season was the first of the Bowl Championship Series, which crowned Tennessee its national champion, the schools first since the 1950s and one year after mega star quarterback Peyton Manning left for the NFL. The BCS combined elements of the old Bowl... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ... The 1999 NCAA Division I-A football season saw Florida State named national champions, defeating Virginia Tech in the Sugar Bowl. ... The Alamo Bowl is a major American college football bowl game played annually since 1993 in the 65,000-seat Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. ... The 2000 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with fans singing Oklahoma! as the Sooners claimed the first national championship of the new millennium, and their first conference championship since the departure of Barry Switzer. ... The 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season saw the hurricane winds blow again as the University of Miami, the team of the 80s, returned to form winning the national title. ... The 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season bucked the trend of boring national title games, providing a game that lived up to the hype. ... The 2002 Penn State Nittany Lions football team represented the Pennsylvania State University in the 2002-2003 college football season. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... SCREW USC! The 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) in a heap of controversy. ... The 2003 Penn State Nittany Lions football team represented the Pennsylvania State University in the 2003 college football season. ... The 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season, like the previous season, ended with another three-way tie for teams deserving a spot in the national title game, and once again fans were left unsatisfied with the result. ... The 2004 Penn State Nittany Lions football team represented the Pennsylvania State University in the 2004 college football season. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... The 2005 Penn State Nittany Lions football team represented the Pennsylvania State University in the 2005-2006 college football season. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The 2006 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 31, 2006 and, aside from all-star exhibition games that follow, concluded with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship Game on January 8, 2007 in Glendale, Arizona, USA, where the... The Nittany Lion The 2006 Penn State Nittany Lion football team will represent Pennsylvania State University in the college football season of 2006-2007. ... 2007 Outback Bowl Bowl Game Tennessee Volunteers at Penn State Nittany Lions Penn State Nittany Lions (9-4) 20 January 1, 2007 Raymond James Stadium The 2007 Outback Bowl Game was a college football bowl game sponsored by Outback Steakhouse. ... The 2007 NCAA Division I FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision) football season, or the college football season, began on August 30, 2007,[1] progresses through the regular season and bowl season, and (aside from all-star exhibition games that will follow) will conclude with the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) National Championship... The 2007 Penn State Nittany Lions football team represents the Pennsylvania State University in the 2007 college football season. ... The USA Today Coaches Poll is the current name for a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I college basketball teams. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ...

Bowls and championships

Paterno holds more bowl victories (24) than any coach in history. He also tops the list of bowl appearances with 34.[9] He has a bowl record of 24 wins, 9 losses, and 1 tie with his latest win in the 2007 Alamo Bowl. Paterno is the only coach with the distinction of having won each of the current four major bowls—Rose, Orange, Fiesta, and Sugar—as well as the Cotton Bowl, at least once. Under Paterno, Penn State has won at least three bowl games each decade since 1970.


Overall, Paterno has led Penn State to two national championships (1982 and 1986) and five undefeated, untied seasons (1968, 1969, 1973, 1986, and 1994). Four of his unbeaten teams (1968, 1969, 1973, and 1994) won major bowl games and were not awarded a national championship. The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ...


Penn State under Paterno has won the Orange Bowl (1968, 1969, 1973, and 2005), the Cotton Bowl (1972 and 1974), the Fiesta Bowl (1977, 1980, 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996), the Liberty Bowl (1979), the Sugar Bowl (1972, 1982), the Aloha Bowl (1983), the Holiday Bowl (1989), the Citrus Bowl (1993), the Rose Bowl (1994), the Outback Bowl (1995, 1998, and 2006) and the Alamo Bowl (1999 and 2007). The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the stadium, see Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... The Sugar Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game played in the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... The Aloha Classic is a now_defunct National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I_A college football bowl game played in Honolulu, Hawaii at Aloha Stadium. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The Holiday Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, since 1978. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Alamo Bowl is a major American college football bowl game played annually since 1993 in the 65,000-seat Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Since joining the Big Ten Conference in 1993, Penn State under Paterno has won the Big Ten football championships two times (1994 and 2005). Joe has had 21 finishes in the Top 10 national rankings. For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... A school name with an asterisk following it (ex: Ohio State*) acknowledges a major recognized national championship for that season. ...


Awards

Following the 1986 championship season, Paterno was the first college football coach named "Sportsman of the Year" by Sports Illustrated magazine. In 2005, following an 11-1 comeback season in which the Lions won a share of the Big Ten title and a BCS berth, Paterno was named the 2005 AP Coach of the Year, and the 2005 Walter Camp Coach of the Year. The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... The Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award is given annually to college footballs top head coach. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the...

On May 16, 2006 Paterno was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame after the National Football Foundation decided to change its rules and allow any coach over the age of 75 to be eligible for the Hall of Fame instead of having to wait for an individual to be retired.[10] However, on November 4, 2006, he was injured during a sideline collision that occurred during a game against Wisconsin. As a result of his injuries, he was unable to travel to the induction ceremonies in New York City and the National Football Foundation announced that he would instead be inducted as a part of the Hall of Fame class of 2007.[11] Paterno was inducted on December 4, 2007.[12] AFCA logo The Amos Alonzo Stagg Award is presented annually by the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) to the “individual, group or institution whose services have been outstanding in the advancement of the best interests of football. ... The 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season bucked the trend of boring national title games, providing a game that lived up to the hype. ... The Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award is an annual College Football award given to the head coach whose team excels on the field, in the classroom and in the community. ... The 1981 Division 1A Football season ended with Clemson, unbeaten and untied, taking the national championship after a victory over traditional power Nebraska in the Orange Bowl. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... The Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award is given annually to a college football coach by the Football Writers Association of America. ... The 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season came down to a rare #1 vs. ... The 1982 Division 1A Football season saw Paul “Bear” Bryant retire as head coach at Alabama with 323 career victories in 38 seasons. ... The 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Penn State winning the National Championship. ... The Paul Bear Bryant Award has been given out annually since 1957 to NCAA college footballs coach of the year. ... The 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season ended with Penn State winning the National Championship. ... The Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award is given annually to college footballs top head coach. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the... The 1994 NCAA Division I-A football season saw yet another controversial finish as both Nebraska and Penn State finished undefeated, and yet Penn State finished a distant second in the final AP and UPI polls. ... ESPN Game Day photo of The Texas Longhorn mascot Bevo seen with the Bowl Championship Series trophy during the 2005 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ...


Officiating and instant replay

In 2002, Paterno chased down referee Dick Honig in a dead sprint following a 42-35 overtime home loss to Iowa.[13] Paterno saw Tony Johnson catch a pass for a first down with both feet in bounds on the stadium's video replay board, but the play was ruled an incompletion; Penn State had rallied from a 35-13 deficit with 9 minutes left in the game to tie the score at 35, and were driving on their first possession in overtime for a touchdown to tie the game at 42. Penn State failed on fourth down and Iowa held on for the win. Dick Honig was an American football official for 22 years in the Big Ten Conference and nine years in the Mid-American Conference and 20 years as a basketball referee for the Mid-American Conference. ...


Just weeks later, in the final minute of the Michigan game, the same wide receiver, Johnson, made a catch, which would have given Penn State a first down and put them in range for a game winning field goal. Although Johnson was ruled out of bounds, replays clearly showed that Johnson had both feet in bounds and the catch would have been complete.[citation needed]


In 2003, the Big Ten Conference became the first college football conference to adopt a form of instant replay. The previous two incidents, along with Paterno's public objections and statements, are often cited as catalysts for its adoption. Within the next year, almost all of the Division I-A conferences adopted a form of instant replay based on the Big Ten model.[14] For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the term Instant replay, see Instant replay (disambiguation). ...


As Penn State football struggled from 2001 to 2004, Paterno became the target of criticism from some Penn State faithful. Many in the media attributed Penn State's struggles to Paterno's advancing age, and contingents of fans and alumni began calling for his retirement. Paterno has rebuffed all of this and has stated he will fulfill his contract which expires in 2008. Paterno announced in a speech in Pittsburgh on May 12, 2005 that he would consider retirement if the 2005 football team had a disappointing season. "If we don't win some games, I've got to get my rear end out of here", Paterno said in a speech at the Duquesne Club. "Simple as that".[15] However, Penn State took a share of the Big Ten title in 2005, gaining the team's first BCS bowl game bid in the Orange Bowl where Penn State defeated Bobby Bowden's Florida State Seminoles in triple overtime. The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... Pittsburgh redirects here. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Stances on college football issues

Paterno has long been an advocate for some type of college football playoff system. The question has been posed to him frequently over the years, as only one of his five undefeated teams has been voted national champions.[citation needed]


Paterno believes that scholarship college athletes should receive a modest stipend, so that they have some spending money. As justification, Paterno points out that many scholarship athletes are from poor families and that other students have time to hold down a part-time job. On the other hand, busy practice and conditioning schedules prevent college athletes from working during the school year.[citation needed]


Paterno once believed that all true freshmen should be redshirted as allowed under NCAA rules.[citation needed] However, he now plays exceptionally talented true-freshmen so as not to be at a competitive disadvantage. In fact, some Penn State recruits, like recruits at many other schools, now graduate from high school a semester early so that they can enroll in college during the spring semester and participate in spring practice. Several team members from the recruiting class of 2005, including Justin King, Anthony Scirrotto and Derrick Williams all received considerable playing time as true freshmen during the 2005-2006 season. Redshirt is a term used in American college athletics. ... Justin Thomas King (b. ... Anthony Scirrotto is a college football player for Penn State under Joe Paterno, and a 2006 First Team All-Big Ten Conference selection. ... Derrick Williams (July 6, 1986 - January 1, 2007) is an American football player at Penn State University. ...


Paterno has been an outspoken opponent of gambling on college sports. He would like to see an end put to legalized college sports gambling in Nevada.[citation needed] This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ...


Philanthropist and education

In addition to his legacy as a coach, Paterno is highly regarded for his contributions to academic life at Penn State. After the announcement of his hiring in 1966, Paterno set out to conduct what he called a "Grand Experiment" in melding athletics and academics in the collegiate environment, an idea that he had learned during his years at Brown.[16] As a result, Penn State's players have consistently demonstrated above-average academic success compared to Division I-A schools nationwide. Over the past five years, the Nittany Lions' graduation rate as measured by the NCAA was the highest in the country three times, most recently exceeding the national average of 64 percent by 19 points.[17] Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ...


Paterno is also renowned for his charitable contributions to academics at Penn State. He and his wife Sue have contributed over $4 million towards various departments and colleges, including support for the Pasquerilla Spiritual Center, which opened in 2003, and the Penn State All-Sports Museum, which opened in 2002.[18] After helping raise over $13.5 million in funds for the 1997 expansion of Pattee Library, the University named the expansion Paterno Library in their honor.[19] This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Pattee Library The Pennsylvania State University Libraries are the members of Penn State Universitys library system. ...


Former player, Franco Harris and his company R Super Foods, recently honored Paterno for his contributions to Penn State by featuring his story and picture on boxes of Super Donuts and Super Buns in Central PA. Franco Harris (b. ...


Political interests

Paterno is a political conservative and a personal friend of former President George H.W. Bush, endorsing the then-candidate in a speech at the 1988 Republican National Convention.[16] In 2004, his son Scott Paterno, an attorney, won the Republican primary for Pennsylvania's 17th congressional district but lost in the November general election to conservative Democratic incumbent Tim Holden.[20] American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born June... Ronald and Nancy Reagan at the podium on August 15, 1988. ... Pennsylvania’s 17th congressional district is located in the central part of the state, including the state capital, Harrisburg. ... Thomas Timothy Holden (born March 5, 1957) is an American politician who has been a member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993. ...


Additional Honors

At the Penn State Creamery, Paterno has a flavor of ice cream, Peachy Paterno, named in his honor. A sub shop, Joegie's, located in Penn State's Hetzel Union Building, is also named after him. The new Creamery, located in the new Food Science Building, opened in 2006. ... The Hetzel Union Building, commonly referred to as the HUB is the student union building centrally located on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ...


See also

Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... Joe Paterno is the current head coach of Penn State Nittany Lions football. ... Joe Paterno is the current head coach of Penn State Nittany Lions football. ... This list consists of college football coaches who have been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame. ...

References

  1. ^ Sporting News: Joe Pa's salary revealed: about $500,000
  2. ^ 2005 Brown University Football Media Guide (pdf). Brown University Sports Information Department (2005). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  3. ^ Joe Paterno GoPSUSports.com
  4. ^ FSU not worried about forfeits. Baltimore Sun (2007-12-21). Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  5. ^ Brant, Tim (2007-12-31). Time To Set The Record Straight. ABC 7 News. Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  6. ^ Brant, Tim (2008-01-11). After Further Review... The NCAA Weighs-In. ABC 7 News. Retrieved on 2008-01-08.
  7. ^ Bobby Bowden Records by Opponent. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  8. ^ Joe Paterno Records by Opponent. College Football Data Warehouse. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  9. ^ Paterno says he has no plans to leave Penn State. ESPN.com (2006-12-04). Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  10. ^ Paterno & Bowden to Receive National Football Foundation's Highest Honor at Hall of Fame Induction. Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics (2006-05-25). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  11. ^ Paterno Postpones Hall of Fame Induction. National Football Foundation (2006-12-21). Retrieved on 2006-12-28.
  12. ^ Viera, Mark (2007-12-05). JoePa enters Hall of Fame after 57 years on sidelines. The Daily Collegian. Retrieved on 2007-12-06.
  13. ^ Fittipaldo, Ray (2002-10-02). Paterno says no apology needed. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved on 2007-09-20.
  14. ^ Instant Replay rundown for the 2005 season. Rivals.com College Football Fanblog. Aug 29 2005.
  15. ^ Harlan, Chico (2005-05-13). Paterno puts career on line. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved on 2007-04-04.
  16. ^ a b Fittipaldo, Ray (2005-05-23). When we say JoePa YOU SAY .... Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  17. ^ More Than Forty Members of Penn State Football Team Earn 3.0 GPA During Fall Semester. Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics (2007-01-25). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  18. ^ Joe Paterno. Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics (2007-01-27). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  19. ^ Paterno Library. 150 Years: Penn State Sesquicentennial. Centre Daily Times (2005-02-22). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  20. ^ U.S. House of Representatives - Pennsylvania 17th. 2004 Election Results. CNN.com (2004-11-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-30.

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. // The paper began publication on July 29, 1786, with the encouragement of Hugh Henry Brackenridge as a four-page weekly, initially called The Gazette. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Centre Daily Times Penn State Football coverage
  • Penn State Football Searchable History (updated through 1999)
  • All Time Record by Opponent (pdf document)
  • Penn State Bowl Game Recaps
Preceded by
Rip Engle
Penn State Nittany Lions Head Football Coach
1966-Present
Succeeded by
Current
Preceded by
Vince Dooley
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award
2002
Succeeded by
LaVell Edwards
Preceded by
Bobby Bowden
Paul Johnson
Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award
1981
2005
Succeeded by
George MacIntyre
Jim Grobe
Preceded by
Lou Holtz
Danny Ford
Fisher DeBerry
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year
1978
1982
1986
Succeeded by
Earle Bruce
Howard Schnellenberger
Dick MacPherson
Preceded by
First recipient
Paul "Bear" Bryant Award
1986
Succeeded by
Dick MacPherson
Preceded by
Bob Devaney
Terry Bowden
Tommy Tuberville
Walter Camp Coach of the Year
1972
1994
2005
Succeeded by
Johnny Majors
Gary Barnett
Greg Schiano
Preceded by
Urban Meyer
The Home Depot Coach of the Year Award
2005
Succeeded by
Greg Schiano
Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... George Hoskins was the first head coach for Penn State. ... Samuel B. Newton was the head football coach at Penn State University from 1896 to 1898. ... Sam B. Boyle was the head football coach at Penn State University in 1899. ... William N. Pop Golden was the head football coach at Penn State University from 1900 to 1902. ... Daniel Alden Reed was an American congressman who represented the state of New York. ... Tom Fennell was the head football coach of Penn State from 1904 to 1908. ... Jack Hollenback was the head football coach at Penn State in 1910. ... Bill Hollenback was the head football coach at Penn State in 1909, and from 1911 to 1914. ... Richard C. “Dick” Harlow (October 19, 1889 – February 19, 1962) was a Hall of Fame football coach. ... Hugo Francis Bezdek (April 1, 1883 in Prague, Austria-Hungary – September 19, 1952 in Atlantic City, New Jersey) was a Czech-American sports figure in the first half of the 20th century. ... Robert A. Higgins (born November 24, 1894 in Corning, New York, died June 6, 1969 in State College, Pennsylvania) was a professional American football player and coach. ... Fred Joe Bedenk (died May 2, 1978, State College, Pennsylvania) was a legendary college baseball coach at Rice University (1925-1926) and Penn State University (1931-1962). ... Charles A. Rip Engle (died 1983), was a Hall-of-Fame coach of The Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team. ... The Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award is an annual College Football award given to the head coach whose team excels on the field, in the classroom and in the community. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... Tom Osborne may refer to: Thomas William Tom Osborne, long-time college football coach at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln; more recently a member of the United States House of Representatives Tom Osborne, politician in Newfoundland and Labrador and member of the Cabinet of Newfoundland and Labrador This is a... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the current head college football coach of the Florida State University Seminoles. ... Ken Hatfield is an American football head coach. ... Jim Wacker Jim Wacker (1937 - August 26, 2003) was an American football college head coach who was known for his enthusiasm and integrity. ... Fisher DeBerry is the former head football coach at the United States Air Force Academy, a position he held for 23 years. ... Dick Sheridan was a college football coach at Furman, and NC State. ... Coach Mac in 2003 Dick McPherson was the Head Coach of the Syracuse University Orangemen football team from 1981-1991. ... Don Nehlen was head football coach at Bowling Green State University and later at West Virginia University. ... Bill Curry (born October 21, 1942) is a former NFL football player and NCAA football coach. ... Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is the current head coach of the United States Military Academy football team. ... George Welsh (born August 26, 1933) is a former American college football coach. ... Eddie Gay Robinson (February 13, 1919 – April 3, 2007) was an American football coach. ... Barry Alvarez Barry Alvarez (born December 30, 1946, Langeloth, Pennsylvania) is a retired college football head coach and current Director of Athletics at the University of Wisconsin. ... Fred Goldsmith is the 18th and current head football coach for Lenoir-Rhyne College. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Bob Sutton is the defensive coordinator of the New York Jets. ... Mike Price (born 1946) is an American football coach, currently the head coach at the University of Texas-El Paso (UTEP). ... Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939, in Saint Joseph, Missouri) is the former head football coach for Kansas State University, holding that position from 1989 to 2005. ... Frank Beamer (b. ... George OLeary (born August 17, 1946 in Central Islip, New York) is the head football coach for the University of Central Florida. ... Ralph Harry Friedgen (b. ... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Paul Johnson is the head coach of football at the United States Naval Academy. ... Jim Grobe (b. ... Lloyd H. Carr (born July 30, 1945) was the head coach of the University of Michigan football team from 1995-2007. ... The Paul Bear Bryant Award has been given out annually since 1957 to NCAA college footballs coach of the year. ... Coach Mac in 2003 Dick McPherson was the Head Coach of the Syracuse University Orangemen football team from 1981-1991. ... This article is about the American football coach; for other people named Lou Holtz, see Lou Holtz (disambiguation). ... William Paul McCartney (born August 22, 1940 in Riverview,Michigan) is the founder and former president of the controversial international men’s ministry known as the Promise Keepers and was the voice of the radio program 4th and Goal from 2000–2002. ... Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is the current head coach of the United States Military Academy football team. ... Don James (born December 31, 1932 in Massillon, Ohio, USA) was a college football coach at Kent State University and the University of Washington. ... Gene Stallings (born March 2, 1935) is a former college and professional football coach // Gene Stallings of Powderly, Texas, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University in 1957. ... Terry Bowden is a college football analyst/commentator, motivational speaker and former college football coach. ... Rich Brooks (born August 20, 1941, Forest, California, United States) is currently the head football coach at the University of Kentucky. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Bruce Snyder was the head football coach of Utah State University from 1976 to 1982. ... Lloyd H. Carr (born July 30, 1945) was the head coach of the University of Michigan football team from 1995-2007. ... Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939, in Saint Joseph, Missouri) is the former head football coach for Kansas State University, holding that position from 1989 to 2005. ... Frank Beamer (b. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Larry Coker (born June 23, 1948 in Okemah, Oklahoma) was the head coach of the University of Miami football team from the 2001 season through the 2006 season. ... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... Nicholas Lou Saban (born October 31, 1951 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American college football coach and the current head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide. ... Thomas Hawley Tuberville (born September 18, 1954) is an American college football coach and current head coach of the Auburn Tigers football team. ... William Mack Brown (born August 27, 1951) is head coach of the University of Texas Longhorn football team. ... Chris Petersen (born October 13, 1964) is an American college football coach, currently the head coach of the Boise State Broncos. ... Mark Thomas Mangino (born August 26, 1956 in New Castle, Pennsylvania) is the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks college football team. ... The Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award is given annually to a college football coach by the Football Writers Association of America. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. ... Paul Dietzel (Born September 5, 1924, in Fremont, Ohio) is a former college football head coach at LSU, Army and South Carolina. ... Ben Schwartzwalder(died 1993) was a Hall-of-fame football coach at Syracuse University. ... Murray Warmath was the head football coach at the University of Minnesota from 1954 to 1971. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... For other persons named John McKay, see John McKay (disambiguation). ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... Ara Raoul Parseghian (born May 21, 1923 in Akron, Ohio) is a former collegiate football coach who served as head coach for three teams, most notably the University of Notre Dame team from 1964-1974. ... Duffy Daugherty on the cover of Time from October 8, 1956 Hugh Duffy Daugherty (born September 8, 1915 in Emeigh, Pennsylvania; died September 25, 1987 in Santa Barbara, California) was the head coach of the Michigan State University Spartans football team from 1954 to 1972, where he compiled a career... John Pont is a college football coach who has served as head coach at Miami University, Yale University, Northwestern University and Indiana University. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... Alexander Arrasi Agase (March 27, 1922 - May 3, 2007) is a former American football player and coach. ... Robert S. Bob Devaney (13 April 1915 – 9 May 1997) was an American football coach, most notably for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Cornhuskers. ... For other persons named John McKay, see John McKay (disambiguation). ... Johnny Majors was a longtime College Football Head Coach and alumnus of the University of Tennessee. ... Grant Teaff (born November 12, 1933 in Hermleigh, Texas) is a retired American Football coach, most well-known for his time at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. ... Johnny Majors was a longtime College Football Head Coach and alumnus of the University of Tennessee. ... This article is about the American football coach; for other people named Lou Holtz, see Lou Holtz (disambiguation). ... Earle Bruce (born March 8, 1931) is a former college football and arena football coach from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... Danny Lee Ford is a former American football coach, who most notably led Clemson University as its head coach to its 1981 national football championship. ... Howard Schnellenberger (born March 16, 1934) is an American football coach at both the professional and college level. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Fisher DeBerry is the former head football coach at the United States Air Force Academy, a position he held for 23 years. ... Coach Mac in 2003 Dick McPherson was the Head Coach of the Syracuse University Orangemen football team from 1981-1991. ... This article is about the American football coach; for other people named Lou Holtz, see Lou Holtz (disambiguation). ... William Paul McCartney (born August 22, 1940 in Riverview,Michigan) is the founder and former president of the controversial international men’s ministry known as the Promise Keepers and was the voice of the radio program 4th and Goal from 2000–2002. ... Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is the current head coach of the United States Military Academy football team. ... Don James (born December 31, 1932 in Massillon, Ohio, USA) was a college football coach at Kent State University and the University of Washington. ... Gene Stallings (born March 2, 1935) is a former college and professional football coach // Gene Stallings of Powderly, Texas, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University in 1957. ... Terry Bowden is a college football analyst/commentator, motivational speaker and former college football coach. ... Rich Brooks (born August 20, 1941, Forest, California, United States) is currently the head football coach at the University of Kentucky. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Bruce Snyder was the head football coach of Utah State University from 1976 to 1982. ... Mike Price (born 1946) is an American football coach, currently the head coach at the University of Texas-El Paso (UTEP). ... Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950 in Winchester, Tennessee), is the head football coach at the University of Tennessee, where he has been since 1992. ... Frank Beamer (b. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Ralph Harry Friedgen (b. ... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... Nicholas Lou Saban (born October 31, 1951 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American college football coach and the current head coach of the Alabama Crimson Tide. ... Urban Meyer (born July 10, 1964 in Ashtabula, Ohio) is currently the head football coach at the University of Florida. ... Charles Joseph (Charlie) Weis (born March 30, 1956 in Middlesex, New Jersey) is the head coach of the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... Gregory Edward Schiano (b. ... Mark Thomas Mangino (born August 26, 1956 in New Castle, Pennsylvania) is the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks college football team. ... The Liberty Mutual Coach of the Year Award is given annually to college footballs top head coach. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the current head college football coach of the Florida State University Seminoles. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Rich Brooks (born August 20, 1941, Forest, California, United States) is currently the head football coach at the University of Kentucky. ... Mike Price (born 1946) is an American football coach, currently the head coach at the University of Texas-El Paso (UTEP). ... Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950 in Winchester, Tennessee), is the head football coach at the University of Tennessee, where he has been since 1992. ... Thomas William Tom Osborne (born February 23, 1937 in Hastings, Nebraska) is a former football coach for the Nebraska Cornhuskers and a current Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Nebraskas 3rd congressional district. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Ralph Harry Friedgen (b. ... Lionel Tyrone Willingham, or Ty Willingham (born December 30, 1953 in Kinston, North Carolina) is the head football coach at the University of Washington. ... Peter C. Carroll (born September 15, 1951, in San Francisco, California) is the current head coach of the University of Southern California Trojans football team, having held that position since 2001. ... Urban Meyer (born July 10, 1964 in Ashtabula, Ohio) is currently the head football coach at the University of Florida. ... Gregory Edward Schiano (b. ... Mark Thomas Mangino (born August 26, 1956 in New Castle, Pennsylvania) is the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks college football team. ... The Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award is given annually to the collegiate American football head coach adjudged by a group of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I-A head coaches and sports information directors under the auspices of the Walter Camp Football Foundation as the Coach of the... John Pont is a college football coach who has served as head coach at Miami University, Yale University, Northwestern University and Indiana University. ... Wayne Woodrow “Woody” Hayes (February 14, 1913 â€“ March 12, 1987) was a college football coach who is best remembered for his 28-year tenure at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... Bob Blackman (July 7, 1918 - March 18, 2000) was a college football head coach. ... Robert S. Bob Devaney (13 April 1915 – 9 May 1997) was an American football coach, most notably for the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Cornhuskers. ... Johnny Majors was a longtime College Football Head Coach and alumnus of the University of Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Frank Kush (born January 20, 1929) was a football coach who most prominently served as head coach at Arizona State University for more than two decades, and also worked in the same capacity for three different professional leagues. ... Frank R. Burns was the head football coach at Rutgers University from 1973 to 1983. ... This article is about the American football coach; for other people named Lou Holtz, see Lou Holtz (disambiguation). ... Warren Powers was the head coach of the Missouri Tigers football program from 1978 to 1984. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Vincent Joseph Dooley (born September 4, 1932 in Mobile, Alabama) was the head football coach (seasons 1964 through 1988) and athletic director (1979 to 2004) at the University of Georgia. ... Jackie Sherrill (born November 28, 1943, in Duncan, Oklahoma) is a former college football head coach. ... Jerry Stovall (born 1941) is a former All-American running back and head football coach for LSU. He was also a star defensive back in the NFL for the St. ... Michael Christopher White (born June 28, 1970) is an American writer, actor, director, and producer for television and film. ... Joe Morrison (1937-1989) was a National Football League football player who played for the New York Giants. ... Fisher DeBerry is the former head football coach at the United States Air Force Academy, a position he held for 23 years. ... For other uses, see Jimmy Johnson. ... Coach Mac in 2003 Dick McPherson was the Head Coach of the Syracuse University Orangemen football team from 1981-1991. ... Don Nehlen was head football coach at Bowling Green State University and later at West Virginia University. ... William Paul McCartney (born August 22, 1940 in Riverview,Michigan) is the founder and former president of the controversial international men’s ministry known as the Promise Keepers and was the voice of the radio program 4th and Goal from 2000–2002. ... Robert Joseph Ross (December 23, 1936, Richmond, Virginia) is the current head coach of the United States Military Academy football team. ... Robert Cleckler Bowden (born November 8, 1929 in Birmingham, Alabama), better known as Bobby Bowden, is the current head college football coach of the Florida State University Seminoles. ... Gene Stallings (born March 2, 1935) is a former college and professional football coach // Gene Stallings of Powderly, Texas, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University in 1957. ... Terry Bowden is a college football analyst/commentator, motivational speaker and former college football coach. ... Gary Barnett (born May 23, 1946 in Lakeland, FL) is a college football head coach. ... Bruce Snyder was the head football coach of Utah State University from 1976 to 1982. ... Lloyd H. Carr (born July 30, 1945) was the head coach of the University of Michigan football team from 1995-2007. ... Bill Snyder (born October 7, 1939, in Saint Joseph, Missouri) is the former head football coach for Kansas State University, holding that position from 1989 to 2005. ... Frank Beamer (b. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Ralph Harry Friedgen (b. ... Kirk Ferentz (born August 1, 1955, in Royal Oak, Michigan) is an American college football head coach of the Iowa Hawkeyes. ... Robert Anthony Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... Thomas Hawley Tuberville (born September 18, 1954) is an American college football coach and current head coach of the Auburn Tigers football team. ... Gregory Edward Schiano (b. ... Mark Thomas Mangino (born August 26, 1956 in New Castle, Pennsylvania) is the head coach of the Kansas Jayhawks college football team. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... Ron Zook (born April 28, 1954 in Loudonville, Ohio) is an American football coach and the current head coach at the University of Illinois. ... Head coach Ron Zook 3rd year, 13–22 Home stadium Memorial Stadium (Champaign) Capacity 65,143 - AstroPlay Conference Big Ten First year 1890 Athletic director Ron Guenther Website CoachRonZook. ... Bill Lynch is the college football head coach for the Indiana Hoosiers. ... Head coach Bill Lynch 1st year, 3–1 Home stadium Memorial Stadium Capacity 50,180 - AstroPlay Conference Big Ten First year 1882 Athletic director Rick Greenspan Website IUHoosiers. ... Kirk Ferentz (born August 1, 1955, in Royal Oak, Michigan) is an American college football head coach of the Iowa Hawkeyes. ... Head coach Kirk Ferentz 9th year, 55–43 Home stadium Kinnick Stadium Capacity 70,585 - Natural Grass Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Gary Barta Website Hawkeyesports. ... For the baseball player, see Rich Rodriguez (L.H. pitcher). ... Head coach Lloyd Carr 13th year, 121–40 Home stadium Michigan Stadium Capacity 107,501 - Field Turf Conference Big Ten First year 1879 Athletic director William C. Martin Website MGoBlue. ... Mark Dantonio (born March 9, 1956) is the current head football coach at Michigan State University. ... Head coach Mark Dantonio 1st year, 5–3 Home stadium Spartan Stadium (East Lansing) Capacity 75,005 - Grass Conference Big Ten First year 1896 Athletic director Ron Mason Website MSUSpartans. ... Tim Brewster is the Tight Ends coach for the Denver Broncos. ... The University of Minnesota Golden Gophers are one of the oldest and most storied programs in college football history. ... Pat Fitzgerald is the current head coach of the Northwestern University Wildcats football team. ... // Basic Information Northwestern University athletics logo Head Coach: Pat Fitzgerald Stadium: Ryan Field Conference: Big Ten All-Time Win/Loss/Tie Record as of 2006: 449-596-44 Big Ten Championships: 1903, 1926, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1995, 1996, 2000 Trophy Game: Sweet Sioux Tomahawk - University of Illinois History The Northwestern... James Patrick Tressel,(born December 5, 1952) is the current head football coach at The Ohio State University. ... For information specifically about the 2006 season, see 2006 Ohio State Buckeyes football team. ... Head Coach Joe Paterno 42nd Year, 363-121-3 Home Stadium Beaver Stadium Capacity 107,282 - Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Tim Curley Website GoPSUSports. ... Joe Tiller (b. ... Head Coach Joe Tiller 11th Year, 67-43 Home Stadium Ross-Ade Stadium Capacity 62,500 - Bermuda Grass Conference Big Ten First Year 1887 Athletic Director Morgan Burke Website PurdueSports. ... Bret Bielema (b. ... Head coach Bret Bielema 2nd year, 20–4 Home stadium Camp Randall Stadium Capacity 80,321 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First year 1889 Athletic director Barry Alvarez Website UWBadgers. ...

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Player Bio: Joe Paterno :: Football (6244 words)
Paterno was back on the practice field in March, moving back-and-forth between the offensive and defensive fields with the same intensity and vigor his players have been accustomed to.
Paterno has remained true to the ideal that a university is an educational institution first and foremost, graduating his student-athletes and constantly striving to instill values of citizenship and sportsmanship.
Paterno was the `98 winner of the initial State Farm Eddie Robinson Coach-of-the-Year Award, established to recognize an active college head coach who exemplifies the qualities of Coach Robinson as a role model to students and players, an active member of the community and an accomplished coach.
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