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Encyclopedia > Joe Orton
Joe Orton
Joe Orton

Joe Orton (Born: John Kingsley Orton 1 January 1933, Leicester, England. Died: 9 August 1967, Islington, London) was a satirical modern playwright. Image File history File links Joe_orton. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Leicester city centre, looking towards the Clock Tower Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city and unitary authority in the English East Midlands region of the UK. The city is the traditional county town of Leicestershire. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Islington is an inner-city district in north London. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ...


In a short but prolific career from 1964 until his death, he shocked, outraged and amused audiences with his scandalous black comedies. Ortonesque became a recognised term for "outrageously macabre". This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...

Contents

Early life

Orton was born in Causeway Lane Maternity Hospital Leicester in 1933 to a working class family. Until the age of 2 Joe lived at 261 Avenue Road Extension, in Clarendon Park Leicester. The family then moved to the Saffron Lane council estate. Joe lived with younger brother, Douglas, and two younger sisters, Marilyn, and Leonie. His parents, William and Elsie, had married in 1931; his father laboured for Leicester Council as a gardener, while his mother worked in the local footwear industry until tuberculosis cost her a lung. Leicester city centre, looking towards the Clock Tower Leicester (pronounced ) is the largest city and unitary authority in the English East Midlands region of the UK. The city is the traditional county town of Leicestershire. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ... Public housing describes a form of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by the mycobacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis. ... Respiratory system The lungs flank the heart and great vessels in the chest cavity. ...


Orton failed the eleven-plus exam after extended bouts of asthma, and attended the private Clark's College from 1945 to 1947 before starting menial work as a junior clerk on £3 a week. The Eleven Plus is an examination which was given to students in their last year of primary education in the United Kingdom under the Tripartite System. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1] Inflation 2. ...


Orton became interested in performing in the theatre around 1949 and joined a number of different dramatic societies, including the prestigious Leicester Dramatic Society. While working on amateur productions he was also determined to improve his appearance and physique, buying body-building courses, taking elocution lessons, and also trying to redress his lack of education and culture. He lost his job and, still 'stage-struck', applied for a scholarship at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in November 1950. He was accepted, and left the East Midlands for London with little regret. His entrance into RADA was delayed until May 1951 by appendicitis. Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Bodybuilder Anders Graneheim (Sweden) Bodybuilding is the sport of developing muscle fibers through the combination of weight training, increased caloric intake, and rest. ... Elocution is proper speaking in pronunciation, grammar, style, and tone. ... Scholarship is the pursuit of academic research, whether in the arts and humanities or sciences, and in all such fields means deep mastery of a subject, often through study at institutions of higher education. ... RADAs theatre in London The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in Bloomsbury, London, is generally regarded as the most prestigious drama school in the world. ... In general, the midlands of a territory are its central regions. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Appendicitis (or epityphlitis) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the appendix[1]. While mild cases may resolve without treatment, most require removal of the inflamed appendix, either by laparotomy or laparoscopy. ...


Meeting with Kenneth Halliwell

Orton met Kenneth Halliwell at RADA in 1951, moving into a West Hampstead flat with him, and two other students, in June of that year. Halliwell was seven years older than Orton and of independent means, having a substantial inheritance. They quickly formed a strong relationship and became lovers, despite Orton's claims of sexual incompatibility. Neither did well in their two years at the academy, although Halliwell did rather worse — earning a Certificate of Merit against Orton's Diploma. The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... West Hampstead is an area in northwest London, England, situated between Childs Hill to the north, Frognal and Hampstead to the east, Swiss Cottage to the south, and Kilburn to the west. ...


After graduating, both went into a regional repertory work; Orton spent four months in Ipswich as an assistant stage manager, Halliwell in Llandudno, Wales. Both returned to London and "their dreams shifted from the stage to the page." They collaborated on a number of unpublished novels (often imitating Ronald Firbank), and had little success, but some encouragement. The rejection of their great hope, The Last Days of Sodom, in 1957 led them to solo works. Orton would later return to the books for ideas and many show glimpses of his stage play style. Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced ) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Stage management is a sub-discipline of stagecraft. ... Llandudno South Parade (on the north shore) viewed from the Great Orme, with the twin mounds of Deganwy Castle in the distance Llandudno Bay and the Little Orme viewed from the Great Orme Llandudno Pier viewed from the Happy Valley gardens A sunny corner in the Happy Valley gardens Llandudno... This article is about the country. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ... Arthur Annesley Ronald Firbank was a British novelist. ...


They refused to work for long periods, confident of their "specialness"; they subsisted on Halliwell's money, (as well as the dole), and were forced to follow a quite ascetic life in order to restrict their outgoings to £5 a week. From 1957-59, they worked in six-month stretches at Cadbury's to raise money for a new flat; they moved into the small and austere flat on Noel Road in Islington in 1959. Unemployment benefits are payments made by governments to unemployed people. ... Cadbury Schweppes plc (Cadbury Trebor Bassett) is a chocolate and beverage company with its headquarters in London, UK. Jacob Schweppe developed a method to make mineral water in Geneva, Switzerland in 1783. ...


Pranks and hoaxes

A lack of serious work led them to amuse themselves with pranks and hoaxes. Orton created Edna Welthorpe, an elderly 'outraged of' whom he would later revive to stir controversy over his plays. Orton coined the term as an allusion to Terence Rattigan's "Aunt Edna", Rattigan's archetypal playgoer. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A hoax is an attempt to trick an audience into believing that something false is real. ... Terence Rattigan — British Playwright Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan (June 10, 1911 – November 30, 1977) was one of Englands most important 20th century dramatists. ...


In another episode, Orton and Halliwell stole books from the local library, and would subtly modify the cover art or the blurbs before returning them to the library. A volume of poems by John Betjeman, for example, was returned to the library with a new dustjacket featuring a photograph of a nearly naked, heavily tattooed middle-aged man. The couple took many of the prints to decorate their flat. They were eventually discovered, and prosecuted for this in May, 1962. Example of book cover art. ... A blurb is a short summary or some words of praise accompanying a creative work, usually refering to the words on the back of the book but also commonly seen on DVD and Video cases, Web portals and news websites. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... Sir John Betjeman CBE (28 August 1906–19 May 1984) was an English poet, writer and broadcaster who described himself in Whos Who as a poet and hack. He was born to a middle-class family in Edwardian London. ... The dust jacket (sometimes dust wrapper or dust cover) of a hardback book is the paper, usually illustrated and including front and back flaps, that protects the binding of the book from scratches. ...


The incident was reported in the national newspaper the Daily Mirror as "Gorilla in the Roses". They were charged with five counts of theft and malicious damage, admitted damaging more than seventy books, and were jailed for six months (released September 1962) and fined £262. The books that Orton and Halliwell vandalised have since become the most valued of the Islington Library service collection. Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... Everyday instance of theft: the bike which fits on this wheel has disappeared. ...


Orton as playwright

In the early 1960s Orton began to write plays. He wrote his last novel in 1961 (Head to Toe), and soon afterward had his writing accepted. In 1963 the BBC paid £65 for the radio play The Boy Hairdresser, broadcast on 31 August 1964, as The Ruffian on the Stair. It was substantially rewritten for the stage in 1966. Template:Unsourced A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is someone who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... The Ruffian On the Stair is a play by British playwright Joe Orton and was first performed on BBC radio in August 1964. ...


Orton revelled in his achievement and poured out new works. He had completed Entertaining Mr Sloane by the time The Ruffian on the Stair was broadcast. He sent a copy to the theatre agent Peggy Ramsay in December 1963. It premiered at the New Arts Theatre on 6 May 1964 under the direction of Michael Codron. Reviews ranged from praise to outrage. Certain influential theatre figures such as Terence Rattigan ensured that Orton's work was performed, however, and there was a clear expectation of good things to come. Entertaining Mr Sloane is a play by Joe Orton. ... May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


Entertaining Mr Sloane lost money in its three week run, but Rattigan invested £3,000 and the play transferred to Wyndham's Theatre in the West End at the end of June and to the Queen's Theatre in October. Sloane tied for first in the Variety Critics' Poll for "Best New Play" and Orton came second for "Most Promising Playwright." Within a year, Sloane was being performed in New York (directed by Alan Schneider, it did very poorly), Spain, Israel and Australia, as well as being made into a film, and a television play. Wyndhams Theatre Wyndhams Theatre is one of two theatres opened by the actor/manager Charles Wyndham (cp Criterion Theatre). ... // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the... The musical Les Misérables transferred to the Queens Theatre in March 2004 after its run at the Palace Theatre The Queens Theatre is a theatre in Shaftesbury Avenue in the West End of London, next to the Gielgud Theatre, as whose twin it was designed by W. G... Variety is a daily magazine for the entertainment industry. ... NY redirects here. ...


The chronology of Orton's works thereafter becomes confusing, as his next major success, Loot, was written later, but performed earlier, than the two television plays, The Good and Faithful Servant and The Erpingham Camp. Hence material that seems less Ortonesque, a backwards step in development and skill, is misleadingly positioned. Loot is a play by Joe Orton. ...


Orton's next performed work was Loot. The first draft was written between June and October 1964 and entitled Funeral Games, a title Orton would drop for Halliwell's suggestion but would later reuse. The play is a wild parody of detective fiction, adding the blackest farce and jabs at established ideas on death, the police, religion and justice. Orton offered the play to Codron in October 1964 and it underwent sweeping rewrites before it was judged fit for the West End (for example, the character of "Inspector Truscott" had a mere eight lines in the initial first act.) Parody of Back to the Future In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes Detective fiction is a branch of crime fiction that centers upon the investigation of a crime, usually murder, by a detective, either professional or amateur. ... A farce is a comedy written for the stage, or a film, which aims to entertain the audience by means of unlikely and extravagant - yet often possible - situations, disguise and mistaken identity, verbal humour of varying degrees of sophistication, which may include puns and sexual innuendo, and a fast-paced...


Codron had manoeuvred Orton into meeting his colleague Kenneth Williams in August 1964. They were "immediately sympatico" and Orton reworked Loot with Williams in mind for Truscott. His other inspiration for the role was DS Harold Challenor, the utter incompatibility of these two sources being lost on Orton at first. Kenneth Williams Kenneth Charles Williams (22 February 1926 – 15 April 1988) was an English comic actor, star of twenty six films and notable radio comedies with Tony Hancock and Kenneth Horne, as well as a witty raconteur on a wide range of subjects. ...


With the success of Sloane evident, Loot was hurried into pre-production, despite its obvious flaws. Rehearsals began in January 1965 with a six-week tour culminating in a West End debut planned. The play opened in Cambridge on 1 February to disastrous and scathing reviews, not for the content but for the plot, the acting, the bright white set, the entire quality of the piece. Pre-production is the process of preparing all the elements involved in a film, play, or other performance. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Orton, at odds with director Peter Wood over the plot (or lack of same), still tore at the play, producing 133 pages of new material to replace, or add, to the original ninety. The cast were demoralised in rehearsal and uneven and tentative on stage. They were, however, impressed by Orton's energy and efforts. The play staggered on to more poor reviews in Brighton, Oxford, Bournemouth, Manchester, and finally Wimbledon in mid-March. "Loot was a dead horse, but it continued to be flogged." Orton retired from the fray for a promiscuous, hashish-filled, eighty-day holiday in Tangier, Morocco. Peter Wood Peter Wood (?-1993) was a british musician, born in Middlesex, England, and a member of Quiver, and Natural Gas, before he began to work closely with Roger Waters, as well as Cyndi Lauper, Jonathan Kelly and Bob Dylan just to mention a few. ... Brighton is located on the south coast of England, and together with its immediate neighbour Hove forms the city of Brighton and Hove. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Bournemouth is a large town and tourist destination, situated on the south coast of England. ... This article is becoming very long. ... Wimbledon (pronounced ) is a suburb of London, part of the London Borough of Merton and located seven miles (11. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A view of Tangier bay at sunrise as seen from Cape Malabata Tangier(Tanja طنچة in Berber and Arabic, Tânger in Portuguese, and Tanger in French), is a city of northern Morocco with a population of 669,685 (2004 census). ...


In January 1966 Loot was revived, with Oscar Lewenstein taking up an option. Before his production, it had a short run (April 11-23) at the University Theatre, Manchester. Orton's growing experience led him to cut over six hundred lines, raising the tempo and improving the characters' interactions.


Directed by Braham Murray, with a more sympathetic and less abstract set, the tuned play garnered more favourable reviews. Lewenstein was still a little cool, however, and put the London production in a "sort of Off-West End theatre," the Jeanetta Cochrane Theatre in Bloomsbury, under the direction of Charles Marowitz. Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... Charles Marowitz (born 1934) is an American writer, playwright and theatre director best known for the 1987 Broadway play Sherlocks Last Case starring Frank Langella. ...


Orton continued his habit of clashing with directors with Marowitz, but the additional cuts they agreed to further improved the play. The London premiere was 27 September 1966, the reviews producing "stunned delight" in Orton. Loot moved to the Criterion Theatre, Holborn in November, raising Orton's confidence to new heights, "a weird, thrilling, slightly unnerving state of grace," while he was in the middle of writing What the Butler Saw. September 27 is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... The Criterion Theatre The Criterion Theatre is a theatre situated on Piccadilly Circus in the West End of London. ... Holborn (pronounced ho-bun or ho-burn) is a place in London, named after a tributary to the river Fleet that flowed through the area, the Hole-bourne (the stream in the hollow). ... This article might not be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ...


Loot went on to win several awards — which had a pleasing effect on the box office — and firmly established Orton's fame. He sold the film rights for £25,000, although he was certain it would flop; it did, and Loot on Broadway repeated the failure of Sloane. Orton was still on an absolute high, however, and over the next ten months revised The Ruffian on the Stair and The Erpingham Camp for the stage as a double called Crimes of Passion, wrote Funeral Games, the screenplay Up Against It for the Beatles, and worked on What the Butler Saw. Film rights, like dramatic rights, these belong to the author, who may sell or option them to someone in the film industry - a producer or director, for example (or sometimes a specialist broker of such properties) - who will then try to gather the other professionals and secure the financial backing... Broadway theatre[1] is often considered the highest professional form of theatre in the United States. ... A rock band from Rotherham, England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Up Against It is an unproduced script by Joe Orton that he wrote it for The Beatles at the height of their fame. ... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ...


The Good and Faithful Servant was a work of transition for Orton. A one-act television play, it was completed by June 1964 but first broadcast by Associated-Rediffusion on 6 April 1967. With its low-key bitterness and regret, and its genuine poignance, it is tame and naturalistic compared to the joyful, macabre heights of his later modern farces, including those which premiered earlier. Associated-Rediffusion, later Rediffusion London, was the British Independent Television (commercial television) contractor for London, on weekdays between 1954 (transmissions started on September 22, 1955) and July 29, 1968. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ...


The Erpingham Camp, Orton's take on The Bacchae, written through mid-1965 and offered to Rediffusion in October of that year, was broadcast on June 27, 1966. The Bacchae (also known as The Bacchantes) is a tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ...


Funeral Games is the real linking work between Loot and What the Butler Saw. It was written and re-written (four times) in July - November, 1966. Created for a Yorkshire Television series, The Seven Deadly Virtues, Orton's play dealt with charity — especially Christian charity — in a mad confusion of adultery and murder. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Yorkshire Television is the ITV contractor for Yorkshire, England, and the surrounding areas. ... Allegorical personification of Charity as a mother with three infants by Anthony van Dyck // The word charity entered the English language through the O.Fr word charite which was derived from the Latin caritas.[1] In Christian theology charity, or love (agapÄ“), is the greatest of the three theological virtues...


In March 1967 Orton and Halliwell had intended another extended holiday in North AfricaLibya on this occasion, but the relationship between them had deteriorated so far that they returned home after barely a day. Orton was working hard, energised and happy; Halliwell was increasingly depressed, argumentative, and plagued with mystery ailments.  Northern Africa (UN subregion)  geographic, including above North Africa or Northern Africa is the northernmost region of the African continent, generally divided by the formidable barrier of the Sahara from Sub-Saharan Africa. ...


Orton's controversial farce What The Butler Saw debuted in the West End after his death in 1969. It opened at the Queen's Theatre with Sir Ralph Richardson, Coral Browne, Stanley Baxter, and Hayward Morse. It was booed so loudly by gallery first nighters that the critics could not hear the lines. // West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland . Along with New Yorks Broadway Theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of theatre in the... Ralph Richardson Sir Ralph David Richardson (19 December 1902 – 10 October 1983) was an English actor, one of a group of theatrical knights of the mid-20th century who, though more closely associated with the stage, did their best to make the transition to film. ... Coral Edith Brown, later Browne (23 July 1913-29 May 1991) was a stage and screen actress. ... Stanley Baxter, (born May 24, 1926 in Glasgow, Scotland), is a comic actor and impressionist, best known for his UK TV shows. ... Hayward Morse (born September 13, 1947, London, England) is a British stage and voice actor. ...


Death

During the night of August 9, 1967, Halliwell bludgeoned the 34-year-old Orton to death with nine hammer blows to the head, and then committed suicide with an overdose of 22 Nembutal tablets washed down with the juice from a tin of grapefruit. Investigators determined that it was Halliwell who died first because Orton's body was still warm. August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... It has been suggested that The Pros of suicide be merged into this article or section. ... A drug overdose occurs when a chemical substance (i. ... Pentobarbital is a barbiturate that is available as both a free acid and a sodium salt, the former of which is only slightly soluble in water and ethanol. ...


The Sunday Times magazine issue November 22, 1970 reported that on Saturday, August 5, four days before the murder, Joe went to the Chelsea Potter pub in the King's Road. He met friend Peter Nolan who later gave evidence at the inquest that Orton told him that he had another boyfriend, that he wanted finally to get rid of Halliwell but didn't know how to go about it.


The last person to speak to Halliwell was his doctor. He had arranged for a psychiatrist to see him the following morning. He spoke to Halliwell three times on the telephone. The last call was at 10 o'clock. Halliwell took the psychiatrist's address and said, "Don't worry, I'm feeling better now. I'll go and see the doctor tomorrow morning."


Halliwell had felt increasingly threatened and isolated by Orton's success, and had come to rely on anti-depressants and barbiturates. The bodies were discovered the following morning when a chauffeur arrived to take Orton to a meeting to discuss a screenplay he had written for the Beatles. An antidepressant is a medication used primarily in the treatment of clinical depression. ... Barbiturates are drugs that acts as central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and by virtue of this they produce a wide spectrum of effects, from mild sedation to anesthesia. ... The Beatles were an English rock band from Liverpool whose members were John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. ...


Halliwell left a suicide note, informing police that all would be explained if they read Orton's diaries, "especially the latter part". The diaries have since been published, but do not offer the promised insight. Oddly, the last eight days of Orton's life are missing, believed to have been taken by the Police.[citation needed]


Trivia

British experimental music group Coil recorded three tracks titled "The Halliwell Hammers" for their 1995 album Worship The Glitch. The two primary members of Coil, John Balance and Peter Christopherson, were lovers through most of the band's existence, and much of their work was inspired by or dedicated to gay icons and personalities of the past. Coil was an English cross-genre, experimental music group formed in 1982 by John Balance—later credited as Jhonn Balance—and his lover Peter Christopherson, aka Sleazy.[1] The duo worked together on a series of releases before Balance chose the name Coil, which he claimed to be inspired by... Worship The Glitch press release Worship The Glitch was the only album to be released by ELpH Vs. ... John Balance (first name also spelled Jhon and Jhonn; born Geff Rushton/Geoffrey Laurence Burton; February 16, 1962 – November 13, 2004). ... Peter Martin Christopherson, a. ...


Biography and film, radio, TV

A biography Prick Up Your Ears, by John Lahr, a title Orton himself had considered using, was published in 1978. John Lahr is an American theater critic and the son of actor Bert Lahr. ...


The 1987 film Prick Up Your Ears is based on Orton's diaries and on Lahr's research. Directed by Stephen Frears, it starred Gary Oldman, Alfred Molina, and Vanessa Redgrave. Alan Bennett wrote the screenplay. Prick Up Your Ears is a 1986 film about the gay playwright Joe Orton and his lover Kenneth Halliwell. ... Stephen Frears in Sweden, 1989 promoting his movie Dangerous Liaisons. ... Gary Oldman (born Leonard Gary Oldman on March 21, 1958 in New Cross, London, England) is an English actor. ... Molina as Dr. Octopus in Spiderman 2 (2004) Alfred Molina (born May 24, 1953) is an English actor. ... Vanessa Redgrave, CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an Academy Award winning English actress and member of the Redgrave family, one of the enduring theatrical dynasties. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor famous for his work, schoolboy-like appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ...


Joe Orton was played by the actor Kenny Doughty in the BBC film Kenneth Williams: Fantabulosa, starring Michael Sheen as Kenneth Williams. Kenny Doughty (born 1975 in Barnsley, South Yorkshire, England) is a British actor. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion... Michael Sheen (born February 5, 1969) is a Welsh actor, mainly known for his stage work. ... Kenneth Williams Kenneth Charles Williams (22 February 1926 – 15 April 1988) was an English comic actor, star of twenty six films and notable radio comedies with Tony Hancock and Kenneth Horne, as well as a witty raconteur on a wide range of subjects. ...


Two archive recordings of Orton survive: a short BBC radio interview first transmitted in August 1967 and a video recording, held by the BFI, of his appearance on Eamon Andrews' ITV chat show transmitted 23rd April 1967 .


Plays

The Visitors is a 1961 play by British playwright Joe Orton. ... The Ruffian On the Stair is a play by British playwright Joe Orton and was first performed on BBC radio in August 1964. ... Entertaining Mr Sloane is a play by Joe Orton. ... Loot is a play by Joe Orton. ... This article might not be written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia entry. ... Up Against It is an unproduced script by Joe Orton that he wrote it for The Beatles at the height of their fame. ...

Novels

  • Head to Toe (published 1971)
  • Between Us Girls (published 2001)
  • Lord Cucumber and The Boy Hairdresser (co-written with Halliwell) (published 2001)

References

  • Prick Up Your Ears: The biography of Joe Orton, John Lahr, Allen Lane, 1978
  • The Orton Diaries, Ed. John Lahr, Methuen, 1986
  • The Sunday Times magazine issue November 22, 1970, The Life and Death of Joe Orton by James Fox

External links

  • Stop Messin' About — The Kenneth Williams Website
  • Online memorial to Joe Orton, Leigh Bowery and others

  Results from FactBites:
 
Joe Orton (553 words)
Joe Orton (January 1, 1933 - August 9, 1967) was a satirical modern playwright.
Orton met Kenneth Halliwell at RADA in 1951, moving into a shared apartment with him and three other students in June.
Orton's career was cut short when he was furiously beaten to death by Halliwell with a hammer, who immediately afterward committed suicide using Nembutal.
Entertaining Mr. Sloane by Joe Orton (935 words)
Orton was born John Kingsley Orton in Leicester in 1933.
Orton was convinced that the two of them had been targeted for prosecution because of their homosexuality.
Presumably Mrs Orton, Joe’s mother, would have been pleased to know that her false teeth had been appropriated from the family home by her son at her funeral and presented to the cast of Loot to use as a prop.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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