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Encyclopedia > Joe Orlando
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Joe Orlando was an illustrator, writer, editor and cartoonist who was born April 4, 1927, in Bari, Italy, and died December 23, 1998, in Manhattan. He was the Vice President of DC Comics for many years and also the Associate Publisher of Mad. Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x720, 101 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links Download high resolution version (500x720, 101 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 1927 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Region Apulia Mayor Michele Emiliano Area  116 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Density 316. ... December 23 is the 357th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (358th in leap years). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ...


Arriving in the United States in 1929, he began drawing at an early age, attending art classes at a neighborhood boys' club when he was seven years old. He continued with those classes until he was 14, winning prizes annually in their competitions, including a John Wanamaker bronze medal. In 1941, he began attending the School of Industrial Art (later the High School of Art and Design), where he studied illustration. This school was a breeding ground for a number of comics artists, including Richard Bassford, Frank Giacoia, Larry Hama, Carmine Infantino, Rocke Mastroserio, Alex Toth and future comics letterer Gaspar Saladino. Infantino and Orlando remained close friends for decades. While Orlando was still a student, he drew his first published illustrations, scenes of Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper for a high-school textbook. Jump to: navigation, search 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... John Wanamaker (July 11, 1838 - December 12, 1922) was a United States businessman, considered the father of the department store and the father of modern advertising. ... 1941 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... High School of Art and Design is a vocational high school in New York City that offers a traditional education, augmented with advanced courses in art and commercial design. ... Airbrush illustration by Richard Bassford Richard Bassford is an American illustrator who has worked in both advertising and comic books. ... Frank Giacoia (1925-1989) is an American comic book artist who sometimes worked under the name Frank Ray and to a lesser extent Phil Zupa and the single moniker Espoia. ... Larry Hama Larry Hama (June 7, 1949 - ) is a Japanese American writer, artist, and musician who has worked in the entertainment industry since the 1970s. ... Carmine Infantino (May 24, 1925-) is a comic book artist and editor who was a major force in the Silver Age of Comic Books. ... Alex Toth (born June 25, 1928 in New York City) is a cartoonist. ... In comic books, the letterer is the person who draws the letters in the word balloons, draws in sound effects and usually designs a books logo. ... The Prince and the Pauper is a 1882 book by Mark Twain that represents his first attempt at historical fiction. ...


Upon graduation, the young Orlando entered the U.S. Army and was assigned to the Military Police, doing stockade guard duty, followed by 18 months in Europe. From Le Havre, France, he was sent to Antwerp, Belgium and then to Germany, where he stenciled boxcars and guarded strategic supplies for the occupation forces. The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Military police (MPs) are the police of a military organization, generally concerning themselves with law enforcement and security. ... World map showing Europe (geographically) When considered a continent, Europe is the worlds second-smallest continent in terms of area, with an area of 10,600,000 km² (4,140,625 square miles), making it larger than Australia only. ... Le Havre is a city in Normandy, northern France, on the English Channel at the mouth of the Seine. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ...


After his 1947 discharge, he returned to New York and began study at the Art Students League on the GI Bill. He entered the comic book field in 1949 when the packager Lloyd Jacquet assigned him to draw for the Catholic-oriented Treasure Chest. This was a "Chuck White" story that paid nine dollars a page for pencils and inks. At the Jacquet Studio he met the artist Tex Blaisdell, and the two teamed later on many projects. Jump to: navigation, search 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Art Students League is the name of several American art schools or associations for promotion of art education For the New-York-based school (founded 1875), presumed model for the others, see Art Students League of New York For the Denver-based school and association, see Art Students League... The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans as well as one-year of unemployment compensation. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Funnies, Inc. ...


In the early 1950s, he was an assistant to Wally Wood on stories for several publishers, including Fox, Youthful, Avon and EC Comics before becoming a regular staff artist with EC in the summer of 1951. He was earning $25 a page at EC, and shortly after his first EC stories under his own name were published that summer, he married his first wife, Gloria, in Sept. 1951. His contributions to EC's Weird Fantasy earned him a ranking in Entertainment Weekly’s "Sci-Fi Top 100." Wallace Wally Wood (June 17, 1927–November 2, 1981), was an imaginative American writer-illustrator who freelanced to a wide variety of markets but is best known for his work in EC Comics and Mad. ... Entertaining Comics was headed by William Gaines but is better known by its publishing name of EC Comics. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Weird Fantasy was part of the EC Comics line in the early 1950s. ... Entertainment Weekly is a magazine published by Time Warner in the United States which is dedicated to the world of celebrity and popular culture. ...

An Orlando illustration for Mad
An Orlando illustration for Mad

After EC, from 1956 to 1959, he drew Classics Illustrated adaptations, including Ben-Hur, A Tale of Two Cities and Rudyard Kipling's Kim. In addition to many contributions to EC's Mad (from 1960 to 1969), Orlando also scripted the Little Orphan Annie comic strip beginning in 1964. He did covers for Newsweek and New Times, and his work as an illustrator appeared in National Lampoon, children's books and numerous comic books. He also worked in toy design, packaging and advertising. Sales of Harold von Braunhut's Sea Monkeys escalated considerably after Orlando drew a series of unusual advertisements visualizing the creatures' enchanted and peaceful undersea kingdom. For Warren Publishing's black-and-white horror-comics magazine Creepy, debuting in 1964, Orlando was not only an illustrator but also a story editor on early issues. Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1010x675, 162 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1010x675, 162 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Classics Illustrated were comic book adaptations from classic literature, a series that Russian-born Albert Lewis Kanter (1897-1973) began in 1941 for Elliot Publishing. ... Ben-Hur is the fictional story of Judah Ben-Hur, a Judean aristocrat who, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Augustus, is enslaved through the betrayal of his Roman friend Messala. ... Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens; it is moreover a moral novel strongly concerned with themes of guilt, shame and retribution. ... This article is about the novel by Rudyard Kipling. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ... Little Orphan Annie is a comic strip created by Harold Gray which first appeared on August 5, 1924. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Jump to: navigation, search The National Lampoon is a humor magazine that began in 1970 as an offshoot of the Harvard Lampoon. ... Basic Characteristics There is some debate as to what constitutes childrens literature. ... Harold Nathan Braunhut aka Harold von Braunhut (31 March 1926 - 28 November 2003) was an American mail-order marketer most famous as the creator and seller of Amazing Sea Monkeys. ... External link The Official Sea Monkey Website What are they? Categories: Animal stubs ... Warren Publishing was a publication company better known for the Warren adult comic magazines which were the major black and white horror magazines from the 1960s through the 1970s. ... Horror can mean several things: Horror (emotion) Horror fiction Horror film This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A script editor - a position sometimes known as story editor in the 1950s and 60s - is a member of the production team of scripted television programmes, usually dramas and comedies. ...


After 16 years of freelancing, he was hired as a DC Comics editor in 1968, handling House of Mystery, Plop and other titles such as Swamp Thing, The Witching Hour and Weird War Tales, eventually serving as DC's Vice President while guiding the company's Special Projects Department. Orlando had a long working association with the prolific letterer Ben Oda, roughing out display lettering effects which Oda would finish. At DC, during the 1990s, Orlando was pleased to discover that designer-typographer Rick Spanier, working on a Macintosh computer, could create polished Oda-like finishes of Orlando's roughs. These Orlando-Spanier collaborations were printed in DC's Superman Style Guide and other DC style guides. Jump to: navigation, search The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... House of Mystery was a horror anthology comic book series published by DC Comics. ... Swamp Thing (vol. ...


During the 1980s, Orlando began teaching classes at the School of Visual Arts, continuing as an art instructor there for many years. After the death of Mad publisher William Gaines, Time-Warner turned Mad over to DC Comics, and Orlando became the magazine's Associate Publisher in 1992. Although he retired from DC in 1996, he nevertheless maintained an office at Mad where he worked on Mad cover concepts and other projects for the next two years. At the time of his death in 1998, he was survived by his wife, Karin, and four children, and his family requested donations be made to the Joe Orlando Scholarship Fund at the School of Visual Arts (209 E. 23 Street, New York, NY, 10010-3994). His artwork for EC Comics has been reprinted extensively in recent years by publisher Russ Cochran, and Cochran's reprint of EC's Picto-Fiction line, containing more Orlando illustrations, is scheduled for publication in 2006. The School of Visual Arts (SVA) is an art school in New York City. ... William Maxwell Gaines (March 1, 1922–June 3, 1992), or Bill Gaines as he was called, was the founder of MAD Magazine but he was also noted for his efforts to create comic books of sufficient artistic quality and interest to appeal to adults. ... Time Warner Inc. ...


External links

  • 1998 interview with Jon B. Cooke
  • "Mummy's Hand," complete story by Russ Jones and Joe Orlando

  Results from FactBites:
 
ComicSource Newsletter No. 10 (444 words)
Orlando was born in Bari, Italy on April 4, 1927, and came to New York two years later.
Orlando's most important artwork was "Judgment Day," a critically acclaimed parable of racial justice published in 1953.
Orlando took on the role of editor in 1968, joining DC Comics to revive the horror comics genre in the guise of gentler "mystery" comics.
Joe Orlando - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (881 words)
Joe Orlando was an illustrator, writer, editor and cartoonist who was born April 4, 1927, in Bari, Italy, and died December 23, 1998, in Manhattan.
While Orlando was still a student, he drew his first published illustrations, scenes of Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper for a high-school textbook.
Orlando made an appearance in Alan Moore's Watchmen, as the illustrator of the fictional comic series Tales of the Black Freighter.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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