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Encyclopedia > Joe DiMaggio
Joe DiMaggio
Center Field
Born: November 25, 1914(1914-11-25)
Died: March 8, 1999 (aged 84)
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 3, 1936
for the New York Yankees
Final game
September 30, 1951
for the New York Yankees
Career statistics
AVG     .325
HR     361
Hits     2214
Teams

New York Yankees (19361942, 19461951) Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Joe_DiMaggio. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Homerun redirects here. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1946 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1951 throughout the world. ...

Career highlights and awards
  • AL MVP 1939, 1941, & 1947
  • Led league in batting average 1939 (.381) & 1940 (.352)
  • Led league in slugging percentage 1937 (.673) & 1950 (.585)
  • Led league in runs 1937 (151)
  • Led league in total bases 1937 (418), 1941 (348) & 1948 (355)
  • Led league in triples 1936 (15)
  • Led league in home runs 1937 (46) & 1948 (39)
  • Led league in RBIs 1941 (125) & 1948 (155)
  • Led league in extra-base hits 1941 (84) & 1950 (75)
  • Led league in At Bats per Home Run 1948 (15.2)
  • Had at least one hit in 56 consecutive games.
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1955
Vote     88.84% (third ballot: first eligible in 1953)

Joseph Paul DiMaggio, born Giuseppe Paolo DiMaggio, Jr. (November 25, 1914March 8, 1999), nicknamed Joltin' Joe and The Yankee Clipper, was a Major League Baseball center fielder who played his entire MLB career (19361951) for the New York Yankees. He was the brother of Vince DiMaggio and Dom DiMaggio. He was born in Martinez, California, and moved to San Francisco at one year old. The family name was often spoken in the media as "di-MAH-gee-oh" (short A as in apple, IPA [dɪ'mædʒi.oʊ]) but was more properly pronounced "di-MAH-zhee-oh" (IPA [dɪ'maʒi.oʊ]). Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The following are the events of the year 1955 that happened world-wide throughout the sport of baseball. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The position of the center fielder A center fielder, abbreviated CF, is the outfielder in baseball who plays defense in center field - the baseball fielding position between left field and right field (e. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Vincent Paul Vince DiMaggio (September 6, 1912 - October 3, 1986) was a Major League Baseball center fielder and right-handed batter who played in the National League for the Boston Bees (1937-38), Cincinnati Reds (1939-40), Pittsburgh Pirates (1940-46) and New York Giants (1946). ... Dominic Paolo DiMaggio (born February 12, 1917 in San Francisco, California) is a former Major League Baseball center fielder, and the brother of Joe DiMaggio and Vince DiMaggio. ... John Muirs home. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ...


A 3-time MVP winner and 13-time All-Star who was widely hailed for his accomplishment on both offense and defense, as well as for the grace with which he played the game; at the time of his retirement at age 36, he had the fifth-most career home runs (361) and sixth-highest slugging percentage (.579) in history. He is also the only player in baseball history to be selected for the All-Star Game in every season he played. In the game of baseball, both amateur and professional, it is tradition to annually recognize the one player in the league who has contributed the most to the success of the players team. ... The Major League Baseball All-Star Game, also popularly known as the Midsummer Classic, is an annual baseball game between players from the National League and the American League, currently selected by fan vote for the starting position players and by the respective managers (from the previous years World... Homerun redirects here. ... In baseball statistics, slugging average (SLG) is a measure of the power of a hitter. ...


A "picture-perfect" player, DiMaggio achieved a 56-game hitting streak (May 15July 16, 1941) that has been called the top American sport feat of all time[citation needed]. After going hitless for one game, DiMaggio hit in the next 16 consecutive games, for a total of 72 out of 73. A 1969 poll conducted to coincide with the centennial of professional baseball voted him the sport's greatest living player. In baseball, a hitting streak refers to the consecutive number of official games in which a player gets at least one base hit. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1969 throughout the world. ...

Contents

Early life

DiMaggio was the eighth of nine children born to Sicilian immigrants, delivered by a midwife identified on his birth certificate as Mrs. J. Pico. His mother, Rosalia, named him "Giuseppe" for his father; "Paolo" was in honor of Saint Paul, Giuseppe's favorite saint. The family moved from Martinez, California to San Francisco when Joe was one year old. Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Midwifery is a blanket term used to describe a number of different types of health practitioners, other than doctors, who provide prenatal care to expecting mothers, attend the birth of the infant and provide postnatal care to the mother and infant. ... Mary Elizabeth Winblad (1895-1987) birth certificate A birth certificate is a vital record that documents the birth of a child. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Look up Family in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Muirs home. ... San Francisco redirects here. ...


DiMaggio's father Giuseppe was a fisherman, as were generations of DiMaggios before him, and wanted his five sons to do the same. Joe would do anything to get out of cleaning his father's boat, as the smell of dead fish made him sick to his stomach. This earned him Giuseppe's ire, who called him "lazy" and "good for nothing." It was only after Joe became the sensation of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) that the old man was finally won over. Salmon for sale at a marketplace The Fishing industry is the commercial activity of fishing and producing fish and other seafood products. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ...


Joe was in semi-pro ball when Vince, playing for the San Francisco Seals, talked his manager into letting Joe fill in at shortstop. Joe — making his debut on 1 October 1932 — could not play shortstop, but he could hit. From May 28July 25, 1933, he got at least one hit in a PCL-record 61 consecutive games: "Baseball didn't really get into my blood until I knocked off that hitting streak. Getting a daily hit became more important to me than eating, drinking or sleeping." Vincent Paul Vince DiMaggio (September 6, 1912 - October 3, 1986) was a Major League Baseball center fielder and right-handed batter who played in the National League for the Boston Bees (1937-38), Cincinnati Reds (1939-40), Pittsburgh Pirates (1940-46) and New York Giants (1946). ... For the professional hockey team see: San Francisco Seals (WHL). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1933 throughout the world. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ...


In 1934, his career almost ended. Going to his sister's house for dinner, he tore the ligaments in his left knee while stepping out of a jitney. The Seals, hoping to sell Joe for $100,000 - a staggering sum during the Great Depression - now couldn't give him away; the Chicago Cubs turned down a no-risk tryout. Fortunately, Yankees' scout Bill Essick pestered the team to give the 19-year-old another look. After Joe passed a test on his knee, he was bought on November 21 for $25,000 and 5 players, with the Seals keeping him for the 1935 season. He batted .398 with 154 RBIs and 34 HRs, led the Seals to the 1935 PCL title, and was named the League's MVP. In anatomy, the term ligament is used to denote three different types of structures:[1] Fibrous tissue that connects bones to other bones. ... A share taxi is a mode of transport that falls between private transport and conventional bus transport, with a fixed route, but the convenience of stopping anywhere to pick or drop passengers, etc. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 10, 14, 23, 26, 42 Name Chicago Cubs (1902–present) Chicago Orphans (1898-1901) Chicago Colts (1890-1897) Chicago White Stockings (1870-1871, 1874-1889) (a. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1935 throughout the world. ...


"The Yankee Clipper"

Joe DiMaggio's number 5 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1952

Touted by sportswriters as Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb and Shoeless Joe Jackson rolled into one, he made his major league debut on May 3, 1936, batting ahead of Lou Gehrig. The Yankees had not been to the World Series since 1932, but, thanks in large part to their sensational rookie, they won the next four Fall Classics. In total, DiMaggio led the Yankees to nine titles in thirteen years. Image File history File links YankeesRetired5. ... Image File history File links YankeesRetired5. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... This article is about the baseball player. ... Tyrus Raymond Ty Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed The Georgia Peach, was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. ... Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1936 (MCMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lou Gehrigs number 4 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1939 Henry Louis (Lou) Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941), born Ludwig Heinrich Gehrig, was an American baseball player in the first half of the twentieth century. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... The 1932 World Series was the twenty-ninth edition of baseballs annual World Series championship final. ...


DiMaggio was an all-round player, as respected for his smooth, effortless fielding as for his hitting. Hank Greenberg told SPORT magazine in its September 1949 issue that DiMaggio covered so much ground in center field that the only way to get a hit against the Yankees was "to hit 'em where Joe wasn't." The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...


On 7 February 1949, DiMaggio signed a contract for $100,000 ($70,000 plus bonuses). He was still regarded as the game's best player, but injuries got to the point where he could not take a step without pain. A sub-par 1951 season and a brutal scouting report by the Brooklyn Dodgers that was turned over to the New York Giants and leaked to the press led him to announce his retirement on 11 December 1951. is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers NY, NY, 3, 4, 11, 24, 27, 30, 36, 42, 44 Name San Francisco Giants (1958–present) New York Giants (1885–1957) New York Gothams (1883–1885) Other nicknames Jints, Gigantes, G-Men Ballpark AT... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Joe DiMaggio's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Joe DiMaggio's plaque at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

He became eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953. DiMaggio told Baseball Digest in 1963 that the Brooklyn Dodgers had offered him their managerial job in 1953, but he turned it down. He was not elected to the Hall until 1955; the rules were revised in the interim, with DiMaggio and Ted Lyons excepted, extending the waiting period from one year to five. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1622 × 2162 pixel, file size: 1,022 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Joe DiMaggios Baseball Hall of Fame Plaque. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1622 × 2162 pixel, file size: 1,022 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Joe DiMaggios Baseball Hall of Fame Plaque. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Baseball Digest is a baseball magazine resource that was first published in August of 1942, and is the oldest baseball magazine in the country. ... Major league affiliations National League (1890–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 4, 19, 20, 24, 32, 39, 42, 53 Name Los Angeles Dodgers (1958–present) Brooklyn Dodgers (1932-1957) Brooklyn Robins (1914-1931) Brooklyn Dodgers (1913) Brooklyn Trolley Dodgers (1911-1912) Brooklyn Superbas (1899... Theodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was a Major League Baseball starting pitcher and manager. ...


He might have had better power-hitting statistics had his home park not been Yankee Stadium. As "The House That Ruth Built", its nearby right field favored the Babe's left-handed power. For right-handed hitters, its deep left and center fields could be a nightmare: Mickey Mantle recalled that he and Whitey Ford would count the blasts DiMaggio hit that would have been home runs anywhere else, but, at the Stadium, were merely long outs (Ruth himself fell victim to that problem, as he also hit many long fly outs to center). Bill James calculated that DiMaggio lost more home runs due to his home park than any player in history. Left-center field went as far back as 457ft, compared to ballparks today where left-center rarely reaches 380ft. An illustration of this batting handicap is the oft-replayed clip of Al Gionfriddo's catch in the 1947 World Series, which was close to the 415 foot mark in left-center. Had it happened in Ebbets Field, it would have been well into the seats for a home run. To paint an accurate picture on how handicapped DiMaggio was by Yankee Stadium; He hit 148 home runs in 3,360 at-bats at home. In contrast, hit 213 home runs in 3,461 at-bats on the road. His slugging percentage at home was .546. On the road, it was .610. His on-base percentage at Yankee Stadium was .391. Away, it was .405. He drove in 720 RBI at home. 817 on the road. When you multiply his road totals by two, you get 426 home runs in 13 seasons, at a pace in which he would hit one home run every 16.2 at-bats (which would be good for 30th all-time.) Expert statistician, Bill Jenkinson, elaborated further on this; This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Mickey Charles Mantle (October 20, 1931 – August 13, 1995) was an American baseball player who was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1974. ... Whitey Fords number 16 was retired by the New York Yankees in 1974 Edward Charles Whitey Ford (born October 21, 1928) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. ... George William “Bill” James (born October 5, 1949 in Holton, Kansas) is a baseball writer, historian and statistician whose work has been widely influential. ... Albert Francis Al Gionfriddo was born on March 8, 1922 in Dysart, Pennslyvania. ... Ebbets Field was a Major League Baseball park located in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York. ...


"From: The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs, by Bill Jenkinson:


For example, Joe DiMaggio was acutely handicapped by playing at Yankee Stadium. Every time he batted in his home field during his entire career, he did so knowing that it was physically impossible for him to hit a home run to the half of the field directly in front of him. That's right! If you look at a baseball field from foul line to foul line, it has a 90-degree radius. From the power alley in left center field (430 in Joe's time) to the fence in deep right center field (407 feet), it is 45-degrees. And Joe DiMaggio never hit a single home run over the fences at Yankee Stadium in that 45-degree graveyard. It was just too far. Joe was plenty strong; he routinely hit balls in the 425-foot range. But that just wasn't good enough in cavernous Yankee Stadium. Like Ruth, he benefited from a few easy homers each season due to the short foul line distances. But he lost many more than he gained by constantly hitting long fly outs toward center field. Whereas most sluggers perform better on their home fields, Joe D hit only 41 percent of his career home runs in the Bronx. In his day, DiMaggio recorded 148 homers at Yankee Stadium. If he had hit the same exact pattern of batted balls with a typical modern stadium as his home, he would have belted about 225 homers during his home field career."


In 1949, Boston Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey and Yankees GM Larry MacPhail verbally agreed to trade DiMaggio for Ted Williams, but MacPhail refused to include Yogi Berra. Had the deal gone through, Williams could have benefited from Yankee Stadium's short right-center fence while DiMaggio could have thrived at Fenway Park with its Green Monster. Ted Williams & Tom Yawkey Thomas Austin Yawkey, born Thomas Austin (February 21, 1903 - July 9, 1976), was an American industrialist and Major League Baseball executive. ... Leland Stanford Larry MacPhail, Sr. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Lawrence Peter Yogi Berra (born May 12, 1925 in St. ... Fenway redirects here. ... This article is about the left-field wall at Fenway Park. ...


Year in Urban Militia

Following the U.S. entrance in World War II, DiMaggio enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces on February 17, 1943, rising to the rank of sergeant. He was stationed at Santa Ana, California, Hawaii, and Atlantic City as a physical education instructor during his 31-month stint, and played baseball. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) was the aviation component of the United States Army primarily during World War II. The title of Army Air Forces succeeded the prior name of Army Air Corps in June 1941 during preparation for expected combat in what came to be known as... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location of Santa Ana within Orange County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Atlantic City redirects here. ...


Giuseppe and Rosalia DiMaggio were among the thousands of German, Japanese and Italian immigrants classified as "enemy aliens" after Pearl Harbor was attacked. They had to carry photo ID booklets at all times, were not allowed to travel more than five miles from their home without a permit, and Giuseppe's boat was seized. Rosalia became an American citizen in 1944, Giuseppe in 1945. This article is about the harbor in Hawaii. ...


Married life

Dorothy Arnold

DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe on their wedding day, 14 January 1954

In January 1938, DiMaggio met actress Dorothy Arnold on the set of Manhattan Merry Go-Round. They married at San Francisco's Saints Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church on November 19, 1939 as 20,000 well-wishers jammed the streets. Image File history File links Dmm. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dorothy Arnold (Nov. ... St. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Even before their son Joseph III was born, the marriage was in trouble. DiMaggio was like many ballplayers: a high-school dropout whose life revolved around the game. While not the New York social figure that Babe Ruth was, he had his fun, leaving Dorothy feeling neglected. However, she was an ambitious social climber who took advantage of her status as the wife of baseball's biggest star. DiMaggio biographer Michael Seidel reported that, except on the nights before Lefty Gomez was to pitch, Dorothy and Lefty's wife, Broadway's June O'Dea, would drag their husbands from one Manhattan nightspot to another. He resented how she complained about his off-the-field activities while she spent his money. But when Dorothy threatened divorce in 1942, the usually unflappable DiMaggio went into a slump, and developed ulcers. She went to Reno, Nevada in February 1943; he followed her and they reconciled. But shortly after he enlisted in the Army and was sent to Hawaii, she filed for divorce in Los Angeles. Joseph Paul DiMaggio III (October 23, 1941 in New York City - August 6, 1999 in Antioch, California) was the only child of baseball legend Joe DiMaggio. ... This article is about the baseball player. ... Vernon Louis Gomez (November 26, 1908–February 17, 1989) American baseball player of Hispanic descent, left-handed, major league pitcher who played in the American League for the New York Yankees between 1930 and 1942. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Endoscopic images of a duodenal ulcer. ... Reno redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


The relationship continued off and on. Dorothy reportedly promised Joe she would wait for him to return from 1946 training camp, but married another man. It was only after he met another blonde actress on a blind date in 1952 did he finally get her out of his system for good.


Marilyn Monroe

According to her autobiography, Marilyn Monroe did not want to meet DiMaggio, fearing he was a stereotypical jock. Both were at different points in their lives: the just-retired Joe wanted to settle down; Marilyn's career was taking off. Their elopement at San Francisco City Hall on January 14, 1954 was the culmination of a courtship that had captivated the nation. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson; June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was a Golden Globe award winning[1] American actress, model, Hollywood icon[2], and sex symbol. ... For other uses, see Stereotype (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Jock (disambiguation). ... To elope, most literally, merely means to run away. ... San Francisco City Hall in Summer 2003. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The relationship was loving yet complex, marred by his jealousy and her ambition. DiMaggio biographer Richard Ben Cramer asserts it was also violent. One incident allegedly happened after the skirt-blowing scene in The Seven Year Itch was filmed on September 14, 1954 in front of New York's Trans-Lux Theater. Then-20th Century Fox's East Coast correspondent Bill Kobrin told the Palm Springs Desert Sun that it was Billy Wilder's idea to turn the shoot into a circus: "... every time her dress came up and the crowd started to get excited, DiMaggio just blew up." The couple then had a "yelling battle" in the theater lobby. When she filed for divorce 274 days after the wedding, Oscar Levant quipped it proved that no man could be a success in two pastimes. This article or section seems to contain too many quotations for an encyclopedia entry. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Trans-Lux is a major manufacturer of real-time displays, and became known for their stock market tickers. ... Twentieth (20th) Century Fox Film Corporation (known from 1935 to 1985 as Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation) is one of the six major American film studios. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Billy Wilder (June 22, 1906 – March 27, 2002) was an Austrian-born, Jewish-American journalist, screenwriter, film director, and producer whose career spanned more than 50 years and 60 films. ... Oscar Levant (December 27, 1906 - August 14, 1972) was an American pianist, composer, author, comedian, and an actor, better known for his mordant character and witticisms, on the radio and in movies and television, than his music. ...


An August 1, 1956 International News wire photo of DiMaggio with Lee Meriwether announced their engagement, but Cramer wrote that it was a rumor started by Walter Winchell. He was later linked to 1957 Miss America Marian McKnight, who won the crown with a Marilyn act. Marilyn biographer Donald Spoto claimed they were "very close to marrying" but she denies it.[1] Biographers and news reports also linked him to Liz Renay, Cleo Moore, Marlene Dietrich, Gloria DeHaven, and Elizabeth Ray, but he never publicly confirmed any involvement. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Facsimile be merged into this article or section. ... Lee Ann Meriwether (born May 27, 1935) is Miss America 1955, and an American actress, appearing in movies, soap operas, game shows and television, best known for her roles as Buddy Ebsens daughter-in-law and crime-solving partner, Betty Jones, in the long-running 1970s crime drama, Barnaby... Walter Winchell (April 7, 1897 – February 20, 1972), an American newspaper and radio commentator, invented the gossip column at the New York Evening Graphic. ... Marian McKnight (born 19 December 1936 in Manning, South Carolina) was Miss America 1957. ... Was an author and convicted felon. ... Cleo Moore Cleo Moore, was a blonde bombshell of 1950s Hollywood films born October 31 1928 (some sources state 1923) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Gloria DeHaven Gloria DeHaven (born July 23, 1925, in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress. ... Elizabeth Ray was the central figure in a scandal in the 1970s that ended the national political career of powerful U.S. Congressman Wayne Hays (D-Ohio). ...

Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio on their wedding day in January 1954. Photo:Howard Frank Archives.
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DiMaggio re-entered Marilyn's life as her marriage to Arthur Miller was ending. On February 10, 1961, he secured her release from Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic. She joined him in Florida where he was a batting coach for the Yankees. Their "just friends" claim did not stop remarriage rumors from flying. Reporters staked out her apartment building. Bob Hope "dedicated" Best Song nominee "The Second Time Around" to them at the 33rd Academy Awards. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... At his death in 1929, Payne Whitney bestowed the funds to build and endow the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic (PWC) on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-Born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel, well known for his good natured humor and career longevity. ... // The Academy Award for Best Original Song is one of the awards given annually to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS). ... The Second Time Around is a 1961 album by Etta James, and the second LP release for the blues singer. ... The 33rd Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1960, were held on April 17, 1961 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. ...


According to biographer Maury Allen, Joe was so alarmed at how Marilyn had returned to her self-destructive ways, falling in with people he felt detrimental to her (including Frank Sinatra and his "Rat Pack"), he quit his job with a military post-exchange supplier on August 1, 1962 to ask her to remarry him. But before he could, she was found dead on August 5. Her death was deemed a probable suicide but is subject to endless conspiracy theories. Devastated, he claimed her body and arranged her funeral, barring Hollywood's elite. He had a half-dozen red roses delivered 3 times a week to her crypt for the next 20 years. Unlike her other two husbands or other men who knew her intimately (or claimed to) he refused to talk about her publicly or write a tell-all. He never remarried. Image:Allen-1-.jpg Maury Allen Maury Allen (1932-) is an American sportswriter, actor, and New York Times columnist. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ...


Death

DiMaggio's grave
DiMaggio's grave

Following lung cancer surgery on October 14, 1998, DiMaggio fell ill again December 11. The attack forced his lawyer, Morris Engelberg, to admit that the positive reports he had been feeding to the press were greatly exaggerated. He claimed Joe made him promise not to tell even his family about his condition. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (845x684, 82 KB) taken by Zedla 06:35, 22 August 2006 (UTC) subject: Joe DiMaggio @ Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma, California. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (845x684, 82 KB) taken by Zedla 06:35, 22 August 2006 (UTC) subject: Joe DiMaggio @ Holy Cross Cemetery, Colma, California. ... Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


DiMaggio died on March 8, 1999. On January 24, NBC broadcast a premature obituary; Engelberg claimed he and DiMaggio were watching TV and saw it. His last words, according to Engelberg, were "I'll finally get to see Marilyn." However, the day after DiMaggio's death, a hospice worker who cared for him gave a radically different account to The New York Post.[citation needed] is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the television network. ... Various notable people have had their death announced in error. ... The Last Words - Malcolm Baxter (vocals), Andy Groome (guitar), Leigh Kendall (bass), John Gunn (drums) - were one of the first Australian punk bands. ... Palliative care is any form of medical care or treatment that concentrates on reducing the severity of the symptoms of a disease or slows its progress rather than providing a cure. ... The first edition of The New York Post of July 6, 2004 incorrectly declared that U.S. presidential candidate John Kerry would choose U.S. Representative Dick Gephardt to be his vice-presidential running mate that day (in reality, Kerry chose John Edwards). ...


DiMaggio is interred at Holy Cross Cemetery in Colma, California. In his eulogy, Dom DiMaggio declared that his brother had everything "except the right woman to share his life with", a remark seeming to confirm the family's disapproval of Monroe. Richard Ben Cramer told the New York Times that Dom cooperated with him on his controversial biography, and got other family members to do likewise. In an eerie coincidence, Joe DiMaggio's estranged son, Joe, Jr., died later that same year. Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in Colma, California is an American Roman Catholic cemetery operated by the Archdiocese of San Francisco. ... Colma is a small town in San Mateo County, California, at the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula next to Daly City and South San Francisco. ... Dominic Paolo DiMaggio (born February 12, 1917 in San Francisco, California) is a former Major League Baseball center fielder, and the brother of Joe DiMaggio and Vince DiMaggio. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


The equally controversial Engelberg offered dozens of signed bats on Shop At Home, for $3,000 each, weeks before DiMaggio died. In April 1999, he sued the City of San Francisco to stop its plan to name the North Beach park, where Joe learned to play baseball, after him. That June, he sold hundreds of items to a collectibles dealer, including baseballs DiMaggio signed on his deathbed, and offered Joe's personal effects at a Sotheby's auction. Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ...


In 2003, Engelberg broke attorney-client privilege, and published his own book on DiMaggio as a rebuttal to Cramer's. This article is about a United States legal term. ...


Legacy

DiMaggio was used by artists as a touchstone in popular culture not only during his career, but decades after he retired. In the South Pacific song, "Bloody Mary" has "skin tender as DiMaggio's glove". Joltin' Joe DiMaggio was recorded during his hitting streak by Les Brown. This article is about the stage musical. ... Les Brown, Sr. ...


In Raymond Chandler's Farewell, My Lovely, Philip Marlowe follows the streak, which Chandler uses as a metaphor for good. A generation later, Simon and Garfunkel used him in that same vein in "Mrs. Robinson". The literal-minded DiMaggio was reportedly not fond of the lyric "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?" as he was very much alive, and had not gone anywhere. However, he changed his mind when he gained a whole new generation of fans from that song.[citation needed] When he died The Times of London observed in its obituary that the lines from "Mrs Robinson" were what DiMaggio would be most remembered for. In their eulogical report on DiMaggio, ESPN SportsCenter quoted the last line of the song: "What's that you say, Mrs. Robinson? Joltin' Joe has left and gone away?" A tributory newspaper comic strip shows DiMaggio standing in front of the Pearly Gates in his Yankees uniform, holding his bat on his shoulder. St. Peter, in foreground, writes in his book: "Memo to Mr. Simon & Mr. Garfunkel: he's here." For other persons named Raymond Chandler, see Raymond Chandler (disambiguation). ... Farewell, my Lovely, by Susie Cornfield, (published by Garret Books, London UK) is a collection of tails and tributes to much-loved, departed pets, including the author’s own Brains the MagnifiCat The book features stories from Jilly Cooper, David Blunkett and Ann Widdecombe and a foreword from the Daily... Ed Bishop had the title role in BBC Radios The Adventures of Philip Marlowe. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are US-American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... Mrs. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... This article is about the American ESPN show. ...


Stephen Jay Gould often wrote of DiMaggio's hit streak as the only sports record that was an unpredictable anomaly based on statistical analysis, and therefore the greatest feat in all of sports. Stephen Jay Gould (September 10, 1941 – May 20, 2002) was an American paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, and historian of science. ...


Woody Guthrie wrote "DiMaggio Done It" about his performance in a crucial series against the Red Sox in June 1949 when surgery for bone spurs in his right heel kept him out of the Yankees' first 65 games and threatened his career. It is during this period Ernest Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea is set, Santiago drawing courage from his hero's ordeal. Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Bone spurs, also known as osteophytes, are bony projections that form along joints. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... The Old Man and the Sea is a novella by Ernest Hemingway written in Cuba in 1951 and published in 1952. ...


DiMaggio is referenced in the Seinfeld episode "The Note", when Kramer claims to see him in a donut shop (and insists that he dips his donuts in coffee, to the disbelief of his friends). In The Simpsons episode "'Tis The Fifteenth Season", Montgomery Burns gives Homer Simpson a DiMaggio rookie card (Burns refers to him as "That promising young rookie from the New York Nine"). In Boobs in the Woods, Daffy Duck gets a befuddled Porky Pig to "Steal home, DiMaggio! It means the game!" Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... The Note is the eighteenth episode of Seinfeld. ... Cosmo Kramer is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Michael Richards. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Tis the Fifteenth Season is the seventh episode of The Simpsons fifteenth season, and the seventh Christmas themed episode. ... Charles Montgomery Burns, normally referred to as Mr. ... Homer Simpson is also a character in the book and film The Day of the Locust. ... Daffy Duck is an animated cartoon character in the Warner Brothers Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of cartoons. ... Porky Pig is an Academy Award-nominated animated cartoon character in the Warner Bros. ...


He is mentioned in The Stranglers "No More Heroes," and John Fogerty's "Center Field." He and Monroe are mentioned in Jennifer Lopez's "I'm Gonna Be Alright", Madonna's "Vogue", Tori Amos's "Father Lucifer", Sleeper's "Romeo Me", Billy Joel's "We Didn't Start the Fire", and Simon and Garfunkel's "Mrs. Robinson". The Stranglers are an English rock music group, formed on September 11, 1974 in Guildford, Surrey. ... This article is about the musician. ... For the meteorologist of The Weather Channel, see The Weather Channel (United States). ... Im Gonna Be Alright (Track Masters Remix) is the second single from Jennifer Lopezs third album, J to tha L-O!: The Remixes. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... For the song by KMFDM, see Vogue (single). ... Tori Amos (born Myra Ellen Amos on August 22, 1963) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Sleeper was a United Kingdom Indie band in the 1990s which was fronted by Louise Wener and had several UK hits. ... William Joseph Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... We Didnt Start the Fire is a song by Billy Joel that references a catalog of headline events during his lifetime, from March 1949 to 1989, when the song was released on his album Storm Front. ... The duo of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are US-American popular musicians known collectively as Simon and Garfunkel. ... Mrs. ...


In 1971, Italian industrial design firm Poltronova released the "Joe" chair, shaped like a gigantic baseball glove. The original brown leather versions are considered collectors' items. For people named Leather, see Leather (surname). ...


In 1974, he became spokesman for Mr. Coffee. Harvey Korman spoofed DiMaggio's commercials in a Carol Burnett Show episode. Mr. ... Actor Harvey Korman in the 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles. ... Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933 in San Antonio, Texas) is an Emmy Award-winning actress, comedian, singer, dancer, and writer. ...


He appeared in the original Angels in the Outfield and The First of May (released 1999). The First of May was DiMaggio's last and most involved motion picture cameo, requiring that he memorize lines for an entire scene. According to director Paul Sirmons, DiMaggio refused payment because the movie's subject, foster children, was dear to him, but Screen Actors Guild rules mandated he take the minimum $250 per day fee. (See The First of May - Official Web Site.) Angels in the Outfield is a 1951 black-and-white film starring Paul Douglas and Janet Leigh. ... Foster care is a system by which a certified, stand-in parent(s) cares for minor children or young people who have been removed from their biological parents or other custodial adults by state authority. ... The Screen Actors Guild (S.A.G.) is the labor union representing over 120,000 film actors in the United States. ...


His hitting streak has been used as a gold standard to compare similar feats in other sports. Johnny Unitas throwing at least 1 TD in 47 consecutive games is often cited as football's version. Martina Navratilova referred to her 74 straight match wins as "my DiMaggio streak." Wayne Gretzky's 51-game point-scoring run also was compared with the streak. DiMaggio was less than impressed, quoted as saying that Gretzky (who scored an empty-net goal in the final moments of a game to keep the streak alive) "never had to worry about a mid-game washout in the middle of the second period." John Constantine Johnny Unitas (May 7, 1933 – September 11, 2002), nicknamed The Golden Arm, was a professional American football player in the 1950s through the 1970s. ... Martina Navratilova (born October 18, 1956, in Prague, Czechoslovakia) is a former World No. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ...


His consecutive game hitting streak was also a point of reference in the Star Trek universe. In an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, a passing reference is made of an unnamed baseball player breaking DiMaggio's streak. That player later is revealed to be Harmon "Buck" Bokai of the London Kings, a favorite player of Commander Sisko in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. The Big Goodbye is a first season episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, first broadcast January 11, 1988. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Benjamin Lafayette Sisko, played by Avery Brooks, is the main character of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ...


On September 17, 1992, the Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital opened, for which he raised over $4,000,000. Elián González was taken there after he was rescued off the coast of Miami. is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Elián González (born December 6, 1993) was at the center of a heated custody and immigration battle in 2000 involving the Cuban and United States governments, his father, his Miami and Cuban relatives, and the Cuban American community of Miami. ... Miami redirects here. ...


Yankee Stadium's fifth monument was dedicated to DiMaggio on April 25, 1999. It replaced a plaque that previously hung at Monument Park: "A baseball legend and an American icon, the greatest player to play the game of baseball." Also on that date the West Side Highway was officially renamed in his honor. The Yankees wore DiMaggio's number 5 on the left sleeves of their uniforms for the 1999 season. He is ranked #11 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players, and was elected by fans to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The last elevated portion of the West Side Highway by Trump Place apartment complex The West Side Highway (officially the Joe DiMaggio Highway, formerly the Miller Highway) is a mostly-surface section of New York State Route 9A (NY 9A) that runs from West 72nd Street along the Hudson River... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1999, MasterCard sponsored the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. ...


An auction of DiMaggio's personal items was held on May 19-20, 2006 by his son's adopted daughters. Highlights included: the ball hit to break Wee Willie Keeler's hitting-streak record ($63,250); 2,000th career hit ball ($29,900); 1947 Most Valuable Player Award ($281,750); uniform worn in the 1951 World Series ($195,500); Hall of Fame ring ($69,000); photograph Marilyn autographed "I love you Joe" ($80,500); her passport ($115,000); their marriage certificate ($23,000). The event netted a total of $4.1 million. Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... For Microsoft Corporation’s “universal login” service, formerly known as Microsoft Passport Network, see Windows Live ID. For other types of travel document, see Travel document. ...


In an article in 1976 in Esquire magazine, sportswriter Harry Stein published an "All Time All-Star Argument Starter," consisting of five ethnic baseball teams. Joe DiMaggio was the center fielder on Stein's Italian team. This article is about the title. ...


Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe's relationship is cited in a number of songs, for example: Diesel Boy Song, "She's My Queen". "She is my queen, she's my Marilyn, and I'm her Joe DiMaggio." Man From Delmonte song "Beautiful People." "I can be your Miss Monroe and you can be my Joe DiMaggio and we can do the things beautiful people like to do." It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Man from del monte. ...


DiMaggio was named the greatest athlete to wear the #5 by Sports Illustrated.[1]. He was pictured, along with his son Joe, Jr. on the cover of the inaugural issue of SPORT magazine in September, 1946. The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Stats

Season G AB R H HR RBI BB SO Avg. SLG
1936 138 637 132 206 29 125 24 39 .323 .576
1937 151 621 151 215 46 167 64 37 .346 .673
1938 145 599 129 194 32 140 59 21 .324 .581
1939 120 462 108 176 30 126 52 20 .381 .671
1940 132 508 93 179 31 133 61 30 .352 .626
1941 139 541 122 193 30 125 76 13 .357 .643
1942 154 610 123 186 21 114 68 36 .305 .498
1946 132 503 81 146 25 95 59 24 .290 .511
1947 141 534 97 168 20 97 64 32 .315 .522
1948 153 594 110 190 39 155 67 30 .320 .598
1949 76 272 58 94 14 67 55 18 .346 .596
1950 139 525 114 158 32 122 80 33 .301 .585
1951 116 415 72 109 12 71 61 36 .263 .422
Career Statistics 1736 6821 1390 2214 361 1537 790 369 .325 .579

The following are the baseball events of the year 1936 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1937 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1938 throughout the world. ... == July == July 4 = Lou Gehrig day was held at Yankee Stadium,Lou said in his speech that he is the luckiest man on the face of the earth. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1940 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1941 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1942 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1946 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1947 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1948 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1950 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1951 throughout the world. ...

References

  1. ^ South Carolina’s first 'Miss America', Marian McKnight

The inaugural issue of SPORT magazine, September, 1946, depicting New York Yankees centrefielder Joe DiMaggio together with his son Joe Jr. ...

External links

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Joe DiMaggio
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... This is a list of members of the Baseball Hall of Fame, in order of induction. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ... Charles Leo Gabby Hartnett (December 20, 1900 - December 20, 1972) was an American Major League Baseball catcher and manager who played nearly his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. ... Theodore Amar Lyons (December 28, 1900 - July 25, 1986) was a Major League Baseball starting pitcher and manager. ... Clarence Arthur Dazzy Vance (March 4, 1891 - February 16, 1961) was a star Major League Baseball pitcher during the 1920s. ... The Veterans Committee, officially the Committee on Baseball Veterans, is a committee of the National Baseball Hall of Fame that provides a second chance for Hall of Fame election to players passed over in regular Hall of Fame balloting. ... John Franklin Home Run Baker (March 13, 1886 - June 28, 1963) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball from 1908 to 1922. ... Ray Schalk of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Joe DiMaggio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2823 words)
DiMaggio was the eighth of nine children born to Sicilian immigrants, delivered by a midwife.
Joe was playing semi-pro ball when Vince, playing for the San Francisco Seals, talked his manager into letting his kid brother fill in at shortstop for the last three games of the 1932 season.
DiMaggio biographer Michael Seidel reported that, except on the nights before Lefty Gomez was to pitch, Dorothy and Lefty's wife, Broadway's June O'Dea, would drag their husbands from one Manhattan nightspot to another.
Joe Dimaggio - MSN Encarta (617 words)
Joe DiMaggio (1914-1999), American baseball player, who was one of the greatest hitters and center fielders of all time.
DiMaggio, who was also known for his smooth and seemingly effortless play in center field, spent 13 seasons with the New York Yankees of the American League (AL) and led the team to 9 World Series titles.
DiMaggio joined the Yankees in 1936, as the era of Yankee legends Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig was ending.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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