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Encyclopedia > Jodrell Bank
The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory.
The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory.

The Jodrell Bank Observatory (originally the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station, then the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories from 1966-1999) is located near Goostrey, Cheshire in the north west of England. The observatory is part of the University of Manchester and has played an important role in the research of quasars and pulsars. In 1979, scientists at Jodrell Bank announced the first detection of a gravitational lens; which confirmed Einstein's theory of general relativity. Download high resolution version (800x890, 173 KB) The 76. ... Download high resolution version (800x890, 173 KB) The 76. ... Goostrey is an old farming village in central Cheshire, in Congleton Borough. ... The Cheshire Plain - photo taken adjacent to Beeston Castle The Cheshire Plain - photo taken towards Merseyside The Cheshire Plain - photo taken from Mid-Cheshire Ridge The Cheshire Plain panorama - photo taken from Mid-Cheshire Ridge Cattle farming in the county Cheshire (or archaically the County of Chester) is a palatine... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the United Kingdom (light green), with the Republic of Ireland (blue) to its west Languages English Capital London Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population –mid-2004... Molėtai Astronomical Observatory An observatory is a location used for observing terrestrial and/or celestial events. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England, was formed by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ... This view, taken with infrared light, is a false-color image of a quasar-starburst tandem with the most luminous starburst ever seen in such a combination. ... Composite Optical/X-ray image of the Crab Nebula pulsar, showing surrounding nebular gases stirred by the pulsars magnetic field and radiation. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... This article is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Albert Einstein, photographed in 1947 by Oren J. Turner. ... For a non-technical introduction to the topic, please see Introduction to General relativity. ...


The observatory was established in 1945 by Dr. Bernard Lovell, who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar in World War II. One of the telescopes of the observatory honours his name. 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Sir Bernard Lovell (born 1913) is a British radio astronomer, director (until 1981) of the Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... Cosmic rays can loosely be defined as energetic particles originating outside of the Earth. ... This long range radar antenna, known as ALTAIR, is used to detect and track space objects in conjunction with ABM testing at the Ronald Reagan Test Site on the Kwajalein atoll[1]. Radar is a system that uses radio waves to detect, determine the distance of, and map, objects such... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8...


The current director is Professor Andrew Lyne. Andrew G. Lyne (born 1942) is a British physicist. ...

Contents


General information

The khlaire trevor Jodrell Bank site was first used for academic purposes in 1939, when the University of Manchester's horticultural botany department purchased eleven acres of farmland from a local farmer.[1] The first use of the site for astrophysics was in 1945, when Bernard Lovell wished to use some radar equipment left over from World War II to investigate cosmic rays. Electrical interference prevented him from doing so in Manchester, so he moved the equipment to Jodrell Bank, 25 miles (40 km) south of the city. The first radio telescope, a wire paraboloid 218ft (66m) in diameter, was built in 1947. The famous "Mark I" telescope, at the time the largest steerable dish radio telescope in the world, 76.2 m (250 ft) in diameter, was constructed in the mid 1950s and became operational in the summer of 1957, just in time for the launch of Sputnik 1, the world's first artificial satellite. Jodrell Bank was the only installation in the world able to track Sputnik's booster rocket by radar, and the fame and income this brought in enabled the considerable construction debts to be paid off. This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Manchester is a city in England, considered by many to be the countrys second city [1][2]. It is a centre of the arts, the media, higher education and big business. ... The 64 metre radio telescope at Parkes Observatory In contrast to an ordinary telescope, which produces visible light images, a radio telescope sees radio waves emitted by radio sources, typically by means of a large parabolic (dish) antenna, or arrays of them. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... To help compare different orders of magnitude this page lists lengths between 10 m and 100 m. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sputnik 1 (Russian: , Satellite 1) was the first artificial satellite to be put into orbit, on October 4, 1957. ...


In February 1966, Jodrell Bank tracked the USSR unmanned moon lander Luna 9 and listened in on its facsimile transmission of photographs from the moon's surface. The photos were sent to the British press and published before the Soviets themselves had made the photos public. 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Luna 9 was an unmanned space mission of the Soviet Unions Luna program. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


The Mark I telescope has been updated twice, to allow greater sensitivity and make structural repairs. At the time of its construction in 1957, it was the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope and was only expected to have an operational lifespan of 10 years. It was therefore upgraded in 1970-71 and 2001-2003. In 1987, on its 30th anniversary, the telescope was renamed The Lovell Telescope in Sir Bernard's honour. In 1988, the telescope became a Grade I listed building. A second radio telescope, the Mark II, was built at Jodrell Bank in 1964, with a diameter of approximately 25 metres (it's elliptical, not circular), while a third telescope, the Mark III, located some 20 miles away near Nantwich is part of the Jodrell Bank Observatory. Other radio telescopes are also located at the Jodrell Bank Observatory - one which is 42ft (13m) in diameter, and a 7m one which is generally used for undergraduate teaching purposes for students of the University. Webcams of these are available for viewing on the Jodrell Bank webpage. 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Location within the British Isles Nantwich Town Square High Street, Nantwich Nantwich - view down Welsh Row The Parish Church of St. ... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England, was formed by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ...


Jodrell Bank Observatory is also the base of the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN), a National Facility run by the University of Manchester on behalf of PPARC. The word Merlin may refer to: Merlin (wizard), the wizard, associated with King Arthur, or things concerning him: Prophetiae Merlini (The Prophecies of Merlin) by Geoffrey of Monmouth, later added into the Historia Regum Britanniae Vita Merlini, by the same author Merlin, a medieval poem by Robert de Boron Merlin... The word Merlin may refer to: Merlin (wizard), the wizard, associated with King Arthur, or things concerning him: Prophetiae Merlini (The Prophecies of Merlin) by Geoffrey of Monmouth, later added into the Historia Regum Britanniae Vita Merlini, by the same author Merlin, a medieval poem by Robert de Boron Merlin... The University of Manchester in Manchester, England, was formed by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004. ... PPARC is an abbreviation for the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, and is the UKs strategic science investment agency based in Swindon. ...


Visitor facilities

A view of the telescope from the Arboretum. Taken in November 2005
A view of the telescope from the Arboretum. Taken in November 2005

The much-visited site was planted as an arboretum by Sir Bernard. Jodrell Bank Arboretum houses the UK's national collections of Malus and Sorbus species and the Heather Society's Calluna collection, on 35 acres (140,000 m²). The arboretum also features a small scale model of the solar system, the scale being approximately 1:5,000,000,000. In 2005, as part of the SpacedOut project, Jodrell Bank became the location of the Sun in a 1:15,000,000 scale model of the solar system covering the UK. A view of the telescope from the Arboretum. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1440 KB) Summary A view of the radio telescope from the Arboretum at Jodrell Bank. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (3008x2000, 1440 KB) Summary A view of the radio telescope from the Arboretum at Jodrell Bank. ... An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Species - Southern Crab - Siberian Crabapple - Sweet Crabapple - Apple - Japanese Crabapple - Oregon Crab - Chinese Crabapple - Prairie Crab - Asian Wild Apple - European Wild Apple Malus, the apples, is a genus of about 30-35 species of small deciduous trees or shrubs in the family Rosaceae, including most importantly the domesticated Orchard or... Subgenera Sorbus Aria Micromeles Cormus Torminaria Chamaemespilus The genus Sorbus is a genus of about 100-200 species of trees and shrubs in the subfamily Maloideae of the Rose family Rosaceae. ... Binomial name Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull Calluna vulgaris is the sole species in the genus Calluna in the family Ericaceae. ... A scale model is a representation or copy of an object that is larger or smaller than the actual size of the object being represented. ... Major features of the solar system (not to scale) The solar system comprises the Sun and the retinue of celestial objects gravitationally bound to it: nine planets and their 158 currently known moons, as well as asteroids, meteoroids, planetoids, comets, and interplanetary dust. ... Major features of the solar system (not to scale) The solar system comprises the Sun and the retinue of celestial objects gravitationally bound to it: nine planets and their 158 currently known moons, as well as asteroids, meteoroids, planetoids, comets, and interplanetary dust. ...


There is an educational visitors' centre at the site. In 2003 the old science centre was demolished to make way for a new one, for which the plans are currently in development. In the interim, visitor facilities are more limited. However, visitors have access to a new path wrapping around the telescope, approximately 20 m from the telescope's outer railway, complete with many information boards explaining how the telescope works and the research that is done with it. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Statistics of the Lovell Telescope


Location:
Latitude 53° 14′ 13.2″ North
Longitude 2° 18′ 25.74″ West
Google Maps ([53.236625,-2.308502]) Satellite picture.
Mass of telescope: 3200 t
Mass of bowl: 1500 t
Diameter of bowl: 76.2 m = 250 feet
Surface area of bowl: 5270 m² = 1.3 acres
Collecting area of bowl: 4560 m² = 1.127 acres
Height of elevation axis: 50.5 m = 165.68 feet
Maximum height above ground: 89.0 m = 292 feet
Radius of wheel girders: 38.5 m = 126.31 feet
Outer diameter of railway track: 107.5 m = 352.690 feet
Amount of paint for 3 coats of the bowl: 5200 L


Timeline

  • 1945 - Bernard Lovell arrives at Jodrell Bank, Cheshire.
  • 1947 - The 66 m transit telescope is constructed.
  • 1949 - The transit telescope is used to make the first detection of radio waves from the nearby Andromeda Galaxy.
  • 1950 - Charles Husband presents first drawings of proposed giant, fully-steerable radio telescope.
  • 1957 - Mark I telescope becomes operational. It tracks the carrier rocket of Sputnik I; the only telescope in the West able to do so.
  • 1960 - Lord Nuffield pays the remaining debt on the Mark I and the observatory is renamed the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories.
  • 1962 - As part of a radio-linked interferometer, the Mark I identifies a new class of compact radio sources, later recognised as quasars.
  • 1964 - The Mark II telescope is completed.
  • 1966 - The Mark I receives pictures from Luna 9, the first spacecraft to make a soft landing on the Moon.
  • 1968 - The Mark I confirms the existence of pulsars.
  • 1969 - The Mark I is used for the first time in a VLBI observation.
  • 1970/1 - The Mark I is upgraded and becomes the Mark IA.
  • 1976 - January storms bring winds of around 90 mph which almost destroy the telescope. Bracing girders are added.
  • 1979 - The first gravitational lens is discovered by the Mark IA.
  • 1980 - The Mark IA is used as part of the new MERLIN array.
  • 1986 - The first pulsar in a globular cluster is discovered. The Mark II telescope is given a new surface which is accurate to 1/3 mm.
  • 1987 - The Mark IA is renamed the Lovell Telescope after Bernard Lovell.
  • 1990 - The new 32 m Cambridge telescope is added to the MERLIN array.
  • 1992 - The MERLIN array becomes a national facility.
  • 1993 - At the request of NASA, the Lovell Telescope searches for the Mars Observer spacecraft.
  • 1998 - The Lovell Telescope begins participation with the SETI project.
  • 2000 - February - The Lovell Telescope searches for NASA's Mars Polar Lander
  • 2000 - Placebo recorded the video for 'The Bitter End' at Jodrell Bank.
  • 2000/2 - The Lovell Telescope is resurfaced increasing its sensitivity at 5 GHz by a factor of five.
  • 2003 - December - The Lovell Telescope searches for the Beagle 2 lander on Mars.
  • 2004 - January - Astronomers from Jodrell Bank, Australia, Italy and the US discover the first known double pulsar.
  • 2004 - Minor scenes for the film of the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy are filmed at Jodrell Bank.
  • 2005 - February - Astronomers using the Lovell Telescope discovered a galaxy that appears to be made almost entirely of dark matter.
  • 2005 - March - Jodrell Bank becomes the centre of the World's largest scale model of the Solar System as part of the Spaced Out project.

1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Sir Bernard Lovell (born 1913) is a British radio astronomer, director (until 1981) of the Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... The Andromeda Galaxy (also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224; older texts often call it the Andromeda Nebula) is a barred spiral galaxy approximately 2. ... 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Charles Husband was a leading architect and consulting engineer in Great Britain. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sputnik 1 (Russian: , Satellite 1) was the first artificial satellite to be put into orbit, on October 4, 1957. ... 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1960 calendar). ... William Richard Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield (10 October 1877 - 22 August 1963) was the founder of the Morris Motor Company and a philanthropist. ... 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar). ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Luna 9 was an unmanned space mission of the Soviet Unions Luna program. ... Bulk composition of the moons mantle and crust estimated, weight percent Oxygen 42. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Composite Optical/X-ray image of the Crab Nebula pulsar, showing surrounding nebular gases stirred by the pulsars magnetic field and radiation. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... This article needs cleanup. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1971 calendar). ... 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... This page refers to the year 1979. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The word Merlin may refer to: Merlin (wizard), the wizard, associated with King Arthur, or things concerning him: Prophetiae Merlini (The Prophecies of Merlin) by Geoffrey of Monmouth, later added into the Historia Regum Britanniae Vita Merlini, by the same author Merlin, a medieval poem by Robert de Boron Merlin... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Bernard Lovell (born 1913) is a British radio astronomer, director (until 1981) of the Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... This article is about the year. ... The word Merlin may refer to: Merlin (wizard), the wizard, associated with King Arthur, or things concerning him: Prophetiae Merlini (The Prophecies of Merlin) by Geoffrey of Monmouth, later added into the Historia Regum Britanniae Vita Merlini, by the same author Merlin, a medieval poem by Robert de Boron Merlin... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... The word Merlin may refer to: Merlin (wizard), the wizard, associated with King Arthur, or things concerning him: Prophetiae Merlini (The Prophecies of Merlin) by Geoffrey of Monmouth, later added into the Historia Regum Britanniae Vita Merlini, by the same author Merlin, a medieval poem by Robert de Boron Merlin... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... NASA logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Mars Observer, launched in September 25, 1992, was the first of the Observer series of planetary missions, was designed to study the geoscience and climate of Mars. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Some SETI observations have been conducted using the 305m radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... NASA logo Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2005-09-01, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Conceptual drawing of the Mars Polar Lander on the surface of Mars. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beagle 2 as it would have looked on Mars Beagle 2 was an unsuccessful British landing spacecraft that formed part of the European Space Agencys 2003 Mars Express mission. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Composite Optical/X-ray image of the Crab Nebula pulsar, showing surrounding nebular gases stirred by the pulsars magnetic field and radiation. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy is a science-fiction comedy film based on the book of the same name by Douglas Adams. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... NGC 4414, a typical spiral galaxy in the constellation Coma Berenices, is about 56,000 light years in diameter and approximately 60 million light years distant. ... In cosmology, dark matter refers to matter particles, of unknown composition, that do not emit or reflect enough electromagnetic radiation to be detected directly, but whose presence can be inferred from gravitational effects on visible matter such as stars and galaxies. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Slang

The name Jodrell Bank has been immortalised in Cockney rhyming slang. Cockney rhyming slang is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ...


See also

See also List of observatories Radio telescopes A more complete list of radio telescopes can be found by looking at the radio telescopes category External links AstroSurf. ...

References

  1. ^ *Bernard Lovell (1968). The Story of Jodrell Bank, 1, Oxford University Press.

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC ON THIS DAY | 14 | 1960: Radio telescope makes space history (434 words)
Jodrell first made contact with Pioneer V after it went into orbit around the Sun, between the paths of Earth and Venus.
Shortly after launch, the Jodrell Bank telescope was used for the first time to give commands to a rocket in space.
By pressing a button at Jodrell Bank, the 90lb (43kg) payload was separated from the third stage of the launching rocket.
Jodrell Bank - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1324 words)
Jodrell Bank was the only installation in the world able to track Sputnik's booster rocket by radar, and the fame and income this brought in enabled the considerable construction debts to be paid off.
In February 1966, Jodrell Bank tracked the USSR unmanned moon lander Luna 9 and listened in on its facsimile transmission of photographs from the moon's surface.
Jodrell Bank Observatory is also the base of the Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network (MERLIN), a National Facility run by the University of Manchester on behalf of PPARC.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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