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Encyclopedia > Joan Plantagenet
British Royalty
Plantagenets

Henry II
Children
   William, Count of Poitiers
   Henry the Young King
   Richard I
   Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany
   John
   Matilda, Duchess of Saxony
   Leonora of Aquitaine
   Joan Plantagenet
Richard I
John
Children
   Henry III
   Richard, Earl of Cornwall
   Queen Joan
   Isabella Plantagenet
   Princess Eleanor
Henry III
Children
   Edward I of England
   Edmund Crouchback
Edward I
Children
   Edward II of England
Edward II
Children
   Edward III of England
Edward III
Children
   Lionel of Antwerp
   John of Gaunt
   Edmund of Langley
   Thomas of Woodstock
   Edward the Black Prince
Child of the Black Prince
    Richard II
Richard II

Joan Plantagenet (October, 1165 - 4 September 1199) was the eighth child of King Henry II of England and his Queen consort, Eleanor of Aquitaine. She was born in Angers. Angevin is the name applied to two distinct medieval dynasties which originated as counts (from 1360, dukes) of the western French province of Anjou (of which angevin is the adjectival form), but later came to rule far greater areas including England, Hungary and Poland (see Angevin Empire). ... This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Henry II of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry II (March 5, 1133 – July 6, 1189), ruled as Duke of Anjou and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... William (August 17, 1153-1156) was the first child of Henry Plantagenet (later Henry II of England) and Eleanor of Aquitaine, strangely born on the same day that his fathers rival Eustace IV of Boulogne died. ... Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Geoffrey Plantagenet (September 23, 1158 – August 19, 1186) was Duke of Brittany between 1181 and 1186, through his marriage with the heiress Constance. ... Categories: Stub | 1156 births | 1189 deaths ... Leonora of Aquitaine (October 13, 1162 - October 31, 1214), was born as Princess Eleanor of England and became Leonora, Queen of Castile. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from April 6, 1199, until his death. ... Richard (5 January 1209 - 2 April 1272) was Count of Poitou (bef. ... Joan was the first daughter and third child of John Lackland, born on July 22, 1210 in Gloucester. ... The wedding of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor and Isabella. ... Eleanor of England (also called Eleanor Plantagenet1 and Eleanor of Leicester) was born in the year 1215, in Gloucester. ... Henry III of England, as depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry III (October 1, 1207 - November 16, 1272) is one of the least-known British monarchs, considering the great length of his reign. ... Edmund Crouchback (January 16, 1245 - June 5, 1296) was the second surviving son of Eleanor of Provence and King Henry III of England. ... Edward I; illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902. ... This article is about the fourteenth century king of England. ... Edward III (13 November 1312 – 21 June 1377) was one of the most successful English Kings of medieval times. ... Lionel of Antwerp, Duke of Clarence, (November 29, 1338 - October 7, 1368) was the third son of Edward III of England, and was so called because he was born at Antwerp, Belgium. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ... Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, (June 5, 1341 - August 1, 1402) was a younger son of King Edward III of England, the fourth of the five sons of the King who lived to adulthood. ... Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester (January 7, 1355 - September 8 (or 9), 1397) was the thirteenth and youngest child of King Edward III of England and Queen Philippa. ... Edward the Black Prince - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Effigy on the Black Princes tomb in Canterbury Cathedral Edward, Prince of Wales, known as the Black Prince (June 15, 1330 - June 8, 1376) was the eldest son of King Edward III of England. ... There is also a play entitled Richard II by Shakespeare. ... October is the tenth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Events November 23 - Pope Alexander III enters Rome. ... September 4 is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years). ... Events John Lackland, becomes King of England Births Deaths 6 April - Richard I of England, from a crossbow during a minor siege in France Minamoto no Yoritomo, founder and first shogun of the Kamakura Shogunate of Japan Heads of states England - Richard I the Lionheart, King of England (reigned 1189... Henry II of England, depicted in Cassells History of England, Century Edition, published circa 1902 Henry II (March 5, 1133 – July 6, 1189), ruled as Duke of Anjou and as King of England (1154–1189) and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland, eastern Ireland, and western France. ... King George V of the United Kingdom and his consort, Queen Mary A queen consort is the wife and consort of a reigning king. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine (Bordeaux, France, about 1122/1124 – March 31, 1204 in Fontevrault, Anjou) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the Middle Ages. ... This article needs copyediting (checking for proper English spelling, grammar, usage, etc. ...


Joan was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France. She was a younger sister of William, Count of Poitiers, Henry the Young King, Matilda of England, Richard I of England, Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany and Leonora of Aquitaine. She was also an older sister of John of England. Marie Capet, Countess of Champagne (1145 - 1198), was the elder daughter of Louis VII of France and his first wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Alix of France (1151 - 1197/1198) was the second daughter born to Louis VII of France by his first wife Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... William (August 17, 1153-1156) was the first child of Henry Plantagenet (later Henry II of England) and Eleanor of Aquitaine, strangely born on the same day that his fathers rival Eustace IV of Boulogne died. ... Henry, the Young King Henry the Young King (February 28, 1155–June 11, 1183) was the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Matilda Plantagenet (1156 - July 13, 1189), also known as Maud, was the eldest daughter of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Geoffrey Plantagenet (September 23, 1158 – August 19, 1186) was Duke of Brittany between 1181 and 1186, through his marriage with the heiress Constance. ... Leonora of Aquitaine (October 13, 1162 - October 31, 1214), was born as Princess Eleanor of England and became Leonora, Queen of Castile. ... John (French: Jean) (December 24, 1166–October 18/19, 1216) reigned as King of England from April 6, 1199, until his death. ...


Joan spent her youth at her mother's courts at Winchester and Poitiers before leaving in 1176 for her wedding in Sicily. On 13 February 1177, she married William II of Sicily and was crowned Queen of Sicily at Palermo Cathedral. They had one son, who died in infancy. Following William's death in 1189, she was kept a prisoner by the new king, Tancred of Sicily. Finally, her brother Richard I of England arrived in Italy in 1190, on the way to the Holy Land. He demanded her return, along with every penny of her dowry. When Tancred balked at these demands, Richard seized a monastery and the castle of La Bagnara. He decided to spend the winter in Italy and attacked and subdued the city of Messina. Finally, Tancred agreed to the terms and sent Joan's dowry. In March 1191 Eleanor of Aquitaine arrived in Messina with Richard's bride, Berengaria. Winchester refers to the following places: Winchester, Hampshire, in England Towns in the United States: Winchester, Arkansas Winchester, California Winchester, Connecticut Winchester, Georgia Winchester, Idaho Winchester, Illinois Winchester, Indiana Winchester, Iowa Winchester, Kansas Winchester, Kentucky Winchester, Maryland Winchester, Massachusetts Winchester, Mississippi Winchester, Missouri Winchester, Nevada Winchester, New Hampshire Winchester, New... Location within France Poitiers (population 85,000) is a city and commune in central France, préfecture (capital) of the Vienne département. ... Events May 22 - Murder attempt by the Hashshashin on Saladin near Aleppo Raynald of Chatillon released from prison in Aleppo May 29 - Frederick Barbarossa is defeated in the Battle of Legnano by the Lombard League leading to the pactum Anagninum (the Agreement of Anagni) September 17 - Seljuk Turks defeat Manuel... February 13 is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events November 25 - Baldwin IV of Jerusalem and Raynald of Chatillon defeat Saladin at the Battle of Montgisard. ... William II (1153 - 1189), king of Sicily, was only thirteen years old at the death of his father William I when he was placed under the regency of his mother, Marguerite of Navarre. ... Sicily (Sicilia in Italian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,700 sq. ... Events January 21 - Philip II of France and Richard I of England begin to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade September 3- Richard I of England is crowned as king of England. ... Tancred (d. ... Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine (Bordeaux, France, about 1122/1124 – March 31, 1204 in Fontevrault, Anjou) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the Middle Ages. ...


Eleanor returned to England, leaving Berengaria in Joan's care. Richard decided to postpone his wedding, put his sister and bride on a ship, and set sail. Two days later the fleet was hit by a fierce storm, destroying several ships and blew Joan and Berengaria's ship off course. Richard landed safely in Crete, but they were stranded near Cyprus. The self-appointed despot of Cyprus, Isaac Comnenus was just about to capture them when Richard's fleet suddenly appeared. The princesses were saved, but the despot made off with Richard's treasure. Richard pursued and captured Isaac, threw him into a dungeon, and sent Joan and Berengaria on to Acre. Isaac Comnenus was the last ruler of Cyprus before the Frankish conquest during the Third Crusade. ...


Joan was Richard's favorite sister, but he was not above using her as a bargaining chip in his political schemes. He even suggested marrying her to Saladin's brother, Safadin, and making them joint rulers of Jerusalem. This plan fell apart when Joan refused to marry a Muslim and Safadin refused to marry a Christian. His ally, King Philip II of France expressed some interest in marrying her, but this too fell apart. Instead Joan was married in 1196 to Raymond VI of Toulouse. She was the mother of his successor Raymond VII of Toulouse (1197-1249). Saladin, king of Egypt from a 15th century illuminated manuscript; the globus in his left hand is a European symbol of kingly power. ... Philip II (French: Philippe II), called Philip Augustus (French: Philippe Auguste) (August 21, 1165 - July 14, 1223), was King of France from 1180 to 1223. ... Events Spring, London, popular uprising of the poor against the rich led by William Fitz Osbern. ... Raymond VI of Toulouse (October 27, 1156 - August 2, 1222) was count of Toulouse from 1194 to 1222. ... Raymond VII of Saint-Gilles (July, 1197 - September 27, 1249) was count of Toulouse, duke of Narbonne and marquis of Provence. ...


This new husband treated her none to gently, however, and Joan came to fear him and his knights. In 1199, while pregnant with a second child, Joan left Raymond and fled to Fontevrault Abbey. Here she found her mother, Queen Eleanor, who offered her refuge and care in her illness. She died in childbirth and was veiled a nun on her deathbed. Her son lived just long enough to be baptised (he was named Richard). Joan was thirty-three years old. The Fontevraud Abbey (or Fontevrault Abbey) is located in the village of Fontevraud-lAbbaye, near Chinon, in Anjou, France. ... Eleanor of Aquitaine (Bordeaux, France, about 1122/1124 – March 31, 1204 in Fontevrault, Anjou) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in Europe during the Middle Ages. ... Childbirth in a hospital. ...


Sources

  • Robert of Torigny
  • Roger of Hoveden
  • Payne, Robert. The Dream and the Tomb, 1984
  • Owen, D.D.R. Eleanor of Aquitaine: Queen and Legend

  Results from FactBites:
 
Joan of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1133 words)
Joan was born at Angers, in Anjou, and spent her youth at her mother's courts at Winchester and Poitiers.
Joan died in Essex in 1238, and was buried at Tarant Crawford Abbey in Dorset.
Born in 1321 at the Tower of London, Joan was the youngest daughter of Edward II of England and Isabella of France.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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