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Encyclopedia > Joan II of Navarre

Joan II, Juana II, or Jeanne II, Queen of Navarre (1311 - 1349) - was the only daughter of King Louis X of France (Luis I of Navarre) and his first wife, Margaret of Burgundy. Louis X the Quarreller (French: Louis X le Hutin) (October 4, 1289 - June 5, 1316), King of France from 1314 to 1316, was a member of the Capetian Dynasty. ... Margaret of Burgundy, 1290-1315 was a princess of the Ducal family of Burgundy of Capetians. ...


On the death of her father (in 1316) and half-brother, Jean I (also 1316), who were kings of both France and Navarre, she was kept out of their succession, mostly because of doubts about her paternity. Her uncles, King Philip V of France (Felipe II of Navarre) and King Charles IV of France (Carlos I of Navarre), took precedence over the young girl on the Navarrese throne, even though it was inheritable by females. With regards to the French crown, the Salic Law was invoked by Philip V and later by Philip VI of France to prohibit its inheritance by her. Philip V the Tall (French: Philippe V le Long) (1293 - January 3, 1322) was King of France from 1317 to 1322, a member of the Capetian dynasty. ... Charles IV the Fair ( French: Charles IV le Bel) ( 1294 – February 1, 1328), a member of the Capetian Dynasty, reigned as King of France from 1322 to 1328. ... The King of the Franks, in the midst of the Military Chiefs who formed his Treuste, or armed Court, dictates the Salic Law (Code of the Barbaric Laws). ... Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293–August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death. ...


After Charles IV of France died in 1328, she became Queen of Navarre through a treaty with the new king, Philip VI of France, who was not a descendant of Navarrese kings and who did not seriously attempt to keep Navarre in his possession. In the treaty, she had to renounce her rights to the crown of France, and her grandmother's estates in Brie and Champagne (which were put into the French royal domain). In compensation, she received counties of Angouleme and Mortain as well as a portion of Cotentin. Later on she exchanged Angouleme for three estates in Vexin:- Pontoise, Beaumont-sur-Oise, and Asnière-sur-Oise. Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293–August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death. ... For other uses, see Brie (disambiguation). ... Champagne is one of the traditional provinces of France, a region of France that is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the regions name. ... Angoulême is a town in southwestern France, préfecture ( capital city) of the Charente département. ... Mortain is a small town and commune in the Manche département, France. ... The Cotentin Peninsula juts out into the English Channel from Normandy towards England, forming part of the north-west coast of France. ... The Vexin is a former region in France, divided since the 10th century between the Norman Vexin (Vexin normand) and the French Vexin (Vexin français). ... Pontoise is a suburban commune of the Val-dOise département, in suburban Paris in France. ...


She thus lost France. But her descent returned to the throne of France when Henry II of France inherited the crown two centuries later, in 1549, and from that onwards, all Kings of France have been carrying also Joan's blood. (Henry II was Joan's issue in 8th generation, through for example his maternal great-grandmother Margaret of Foix-Navarre, duchess consort of Brittany, and through Margaret's husband's great-grandmother Joan of Navarre, queen of England and also duchess consort of Brittany, who herself was Joan's granddaughter.) Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from July 31, 1547 until his death. ...


She reigned as queen from 1328 to 1349, together with her husband, Felipe III of Navarre as king consort, during (1329-1343). He was count Philip of Evreux, the heir of count Louis of Evreux (youngest son of Philip III of France), and thus of Capetian male blood. Because of his patrimony lands, together with Joan's gains in Normandy and her rights in Champagne, the couple had extensive possessions in Northern France. Philip III of Navarre and Philip of Evreux (1301 – 1343) – Philippe, comte dÉvreux in Fr. ... King consort is a title given in some monarchies to the husband of a Queen regnant. ... Philippe III Philip III the Bold ( French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 - October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... The direct Capetian Dynasty followed the Carolingian rulers of France from 987 to 1328. ...


Altogether, Joan and Philip produced 8 children; they are listed in the entry for Philip III of Navarre. She was succeeded by their son Charles the Bad of Navarre. Their daughter Blanche became the second wife of Philip VI of France. Philip III of Navarre and Philip of Evreux (1301 – 1343) – Philippe, comte dÉvreux in Fr. ... Charles II ( 1332 - 1387), called Charles the Bad, was King of Navarre, Count of Evreux (Comte dEvreux), and Lord of Albret (Sire dAlbret). ... Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293–August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Joan II of Navarre - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (415 words)
Joan II of Navarre (1311–1349), was Queen of Navarre 1328–1349.
Her uncles, King Philip V of France (II of Navarre) and King Charles IV of France (I of Navarre), took precedence over the young girl on the Navarrese throne, even though it was inheritable by females.
After Charles IV of France died in 1328, she became Queen of Navarre through a treaty with the new king, Philip VI of France, who was not an immediate descendant of the Kings of Navarre.
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