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Encyclopedia > Joan I of Naples

Queen Joan I (1327May 12, 1382) was born Joanna of Anjou. She was Countess of Provence and Forcalquier, Queen of Naples and titular Queen of Jerusalem and Sicily 13431382, and Princess of Achaea 1373/1375–1381. Image File history File links Joan_I_of_Naples. ... Image File history File links Joan_I_of_Naples. ... Events January 25 - Edward III becomes King of England. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Enyu of Japan, fifth and last of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Emperor Go-Komatsu ascends to the throne of Japan John Wyclifs teachings are condemned by the Synod of London. ... Look up Count in Wiktionary, the free dictionary A count is a nobleman in most European countries, equivalent in rank to a British earl, whose wife is still a countess (for lack of an Anglo-Saxon term). ... Provence is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to Frances border with Italy. ... Forcalquier is a commune of the Alpes-de-Haute-Provence département, in France. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154... This is a list of Kings of Jerusalem, from 1099 to 1291, as well as claimants to the title up to the present day. ... Events Magnus II of Sweden abdicates from the throne of Norway in favor of his son Haakon VI of Norway. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Enyu of Japan, fifth and last of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Emperor Go-Komatsu ascends to the throne of Japan John Wyclifs teachings are condemned by the Synod of London. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... Events Bristol is made an independent county. ... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ...


She was the daughter of Charles, Duke of Calabria (eldest son of king Robert of Naples) and Marie of Valois (a sister of King Philip VI of France). At the age of seven years (1334), she was betrothed to her 6-year-old second cousin Prince Andrew (Hung: Endre) of the Hungarian branch of the House of Anjou, the son of Charles I of Hungary and younger brother of Louis I. Charles, Duke of Calabria (Naples, 1298 – November 9, 1328, Naples) was the son of Robert of Naples and Yolanda of Aragon. ... King Robert I of Naples a. ... Philip VI of France Philip VI of Valois (French: Philippe VI de Valois; 1293 – August 22, 1350) was the King of France from 1328 to his death, and Count of Anjou, Maine, and Valois 1325–1328. ... Events Births January 4 - Amadeus VI of Savoy, Count of Savoy (died 1383) January 13 - King Henry II of Castile (died 1379) May 25 - Emperor Suko of Japan, third of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders (died 1398) August 30 - King Peter I of Castile (died 1369) James I of Cyprus (died... Andrew, Duke of Calabria (October 30, 1327 – September 18/19, 1345, Aversa) was the second surviving son of Charles I of Hungary and Elizabeth of Poland. ... Counts of Anjou, c. ... Charles I of Hungary Charles I of Hungary (Anjou France 1288 or 1291–Visegrád, Hungary July 16, 1342), also called Charles Robert, Carobert and Charles I Robert, was the king of Hungary from August 27, 1310. ... Louis the Great. ...


On the death in 1343 of her grandfather, Robert of Naples, his will provided that Andrew should be crowned King of Naples in his own right as well as Joanna's, Robert having displaced Andrew's father, Charles Robert, from the Neapolitan throne. The 16-year-old Joanna resisted this provision of the will with the support of the Neapolitan nobility, and the resulting turmoil resulted in the intervention of Pope Clement VI, as the feudal overlord of the Kingdom. He sent Cardinal Americ of St. Martin to annul Robert's will and take temporary control of the Kingdom of Naples. The Cardinal crowned Joanna alone as Queen of Naples at Santa Chiara in Rome in August 1344. After the assassination of Andrew in 1345 (probably under her own orders), Joanna married three more times: 2) Louis of Taranto (13201362); 3) James IV of Majorca and Prince of Achaea (13361375) and 4) Otto, Duke of Brunswick-Grubenhagen (13761398). Her one son by Andrew died at a young age, and her two daughters by Louis also died young, too. King Robert I of Naples a. ... Charles I of Hungary Charles I of Hungary (Anjou France 1288 or 1291–Visegrád, Hungary July 16, 1342), also called Charles Robert, Carobert and Charles I Robert, was the king of Hungary from August 27, 1310. ... Clement VI, né Pierre Roger (1291 – December 6, 1352), the fourth of the Avignon Popes, was elected in May 1342, and reigned until his death. ... A cardinal is a senior ecclesiastical official in the Roman Catholic Church, ranking just below the Pope and appointed by him as a member of the College of Cardinals during a consistory. ... This article is about the capital of Italy. ... Events English king Edward III introduces three new gold coins, the florin. ... Assassination is the deliberate killing of an important person, usually a political figure or other strategically important individual. ... Events Miracle of the Host Births October 31 - King Fernando I of Portugal (died 1383) Agnès of Valois, daughter of John II of France (died 1349) Eleanor Maltravers, English noblewoman (died 1405) Deaths April 14 - Richard Aungerville, English writer and bishop (born 1287) September 16 - John IV, Duke of... Louis of Taranto (1320-1362): of the Anjou family, Prince of Taranto, King of Naples. ... Events January 20 - Dante - Quaestio de Aqua et Terra January 20 - Duke Wladyslaw Lokietek becomes king of Poland April 6 - The Scots reaffirm their independence by signing the Declaration of Arbroath. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1357 1358 1359 1360 1361 - 1362 - 1363 1364 1365 1366 1367 See also: 1362 state leaders Events Under Edward III, English replaces French as Englands national language, for the... James of Morea (died 1375), son of James III of Majorca, succeeded 1349 his father as Prince of Achaia and as pretender of kingdom of Majorca. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... Events End of the Kemmu restoration and beginning of the Muromachi period in Japan. ... Events October 24 - Valdemar IV of Denmark dies and is succeeded by his grandson Olaf III of Denmark. ... // Events March – The treaty between England and France is extended until April of 1377. ... Events Glendalough monastery, Wicklow Ireland destroyed. ...


Her reign was marked by violent political struggles among the members of the Angevin house. The assassination of Andrew brought about the enmity of Hungary and an invasion led by Louis I. Her second husband, Louis of Taranto, was crowned as co-king in 1353, the only one of her husbands to whom she willingly accorded that status. In 1373, her cousin and former brother-in-law Philip II of Taranto resigned to her his rights to the Principality of Achaea. Her third husband James also left to her, at his death in 1375, his own claim to the Principality. On August 8, 1347 she opened a large brothel on the property in Avignon which was to be used by the wealthy and nobility of Europe. She later sold all the property in Avignon to Pope Clement VI, effectively ending the prostitution trade in Avignon. Louis the Great. ... Events The Decameron was finished by Giovanni Boccaccio. ... Events Bristol is made an independent county. ... Philip II of Taranto (1329-1374): of the Angevin house, Prince of Achaea and Taranto, titular Emperor of Constantinople. ... The Principality of Achaea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade. ... August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (221st in leap years), with 145 days remaining. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... It has been suggested that Mega-brothel be merged into this article or section. ... View over the Rhône River to North-East with Mt Ventoux at the rear Palais des papes Square below the Palace of the Popes Paul Vs coat-of-arms on the Palais des papes The Notre Dame des Doms cathedral is located in the heart of Avignon, near... Clement VI, né Pierre Roger (1291 – December 6, 1352), the fourth of the Avignon Popes, was elected in May 1342, and reigned until his death. ...


In addition, Joan supported the Avignon Papacy during the Western Schism and allied herself with France, adopting Louis I of Anjou, a younger son of John II of France as her heir. France and Antipope Clement VII counted Naples to give them a foothold in Italy useful for the idea of resolving the schism by force in their favor. In retaliation, Pope Urban VI declared her kingdom (a papal fief) to be forfeit and bestowed it upon Charles of Durazzo, her niece's husband and the heir-male. With Hungarian support, Charles advanced on Naples and captured Joan in 1381. She was strangled in prison in the Castle of San Fele on May 12, 1382. The Papal palace in Avignon In the history of the Roman Catholic Church, the Avignon Papacy was the period from 1305 to 1378 during which the Bishop of Rome, the Pope, lived in Avignon (now a part of France) rather than in Rome. ... Historical map of the Western Schism. ... Louis I of Anjou (July 23, 1339, Château de Vincennes, – September 20, 1384, Biselia) was the second son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxembourg. ... John II the Good (French: Jean II le Bon) (April 16, 1319 – April 8, 1364), was King of France 1350–1364, Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou and Maine 1332–1350, Count of Poitiers 1344–1350, and Duke of Guienne 1345–1350. ... Urban VI, born Bartolomeo Prignano (Naples c. ... Charles III, King of Naples, also known as Charles II of Hungary and Charles of Durazzo, Charles the Short, reigned as King of Naples from 1382 to 1386 and as King of Hungary (under the name of King Károly II the Small) for one year only from 1385 to... Naples (Italian Napoli, Neapolitan Nàpule, from Greek Νέα Πόλις - Néa Pólis - meaning New City; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is the largest city in southern Italy and capital of Campania Region and the Province of Naples. ... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ... San Fele is a town and comune in the province of Potenza, in the Southern Italian region of Basilicata. ... May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (133rd in leap years). ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Go-Enyu of Japan, fifth and last of the Northern Ashikaga Pretenders Emperor Go-Komatsu ascends to the throne of Japan John Wyclifs teachings are condemned by the Synod of London. ...


After her death, Charles of Durazzo succeeded her in the Kingdom of Naples. The Neapolitan kingdom was left to decades of recurring succession wars.


Her adopted heir, Louis of Anjou, was able to retain the mainland counties of Provence and Forcalquier. James of Baux, the nephew of Philip II of Taranto, claimed the Principality of Achaea after her deposition in 1381. James of Baux was the last Latin Emperor of Constantinople (1373-1383). ...


Alexandre Dumas, Pere wrote a romance, Joan of Naples, part of his eight-volume series Celebrated Crimes (1839–40). Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ...


A fictionalised account of her life can also be found in the novel Queen of the Night by Alan Savage.


External link

  • A. Dumas, Joan of Naples: e-text
Preceded by:
Robert
Queen of Naples
1343–1382
Succeeded by:
Charles III
Preceded by:
Philip III
Princess of Achaea
1373–1381
Succeeded by:
James

  Results from FactBites:
 
Charles III of Naples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (325 words)
As the great-grandchild of King Charles II of Naples, he was a second cousin to Queen Joan I (both agnatically) and also adopted by her as a child, since he was the only male of the senior Angevin line of Sicily.
The conflict between Joan and Pope Urban VI caused the Pope (as feudal overlord of the kingdom) to declare her dethroned in 1381 and give the kingdom to Charles.
However, Joan's adopted heir Louis I of Anjou took possession of the Counties of Provence and Forcalquier and marched on Naples to claim the kingdom, but was defeated by Charles.
Joan I of Naples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (583 words)
She was Countess of Provence and Forcalquier, Queen of Naples and titular Queen of Jerusalem and Sicily 1343–1382, and Princess of Achaea 1373/1375–1381.
She was the daughter of Charles, Duke of Calabria (eldest son of king Robert I of Naples) and Marie of Valois (a sister of King Philip VI of France).
In addition, Joan supported the Avignon Papacy during the Western Schism and allied herself with France, adopting Louis I of Anjou, a younger son of John II of France as her heir.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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