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Encyclopedia > Joan Didion

Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. Didion contributes regularly to The New York Review of Books. With her late husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, she collaborated on several screenplays. She lives in New York City. December 5 is the 339th day (340th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the literary magazine. ... John Gregory Dunne (25 May 1932 - 30 December 2003) was an American novelist, screenwriter and literary critic. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


Didion was born in Sacramento, California and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 1956 with a BA in English. Much of Didion's writing draws from her life in California, particularly during the 1960s as the world in which she grew up "began to seem remote." Her portrayals of conspiracy theorists, paranoiacs, and sociopaths are now considered part of the canon of American literature.[citation needed] Location of Sacramento in California County Sacramento Government  - Mayor Heather Fargo Area  - City  99. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... American literature refers to written or literary work produced in the area of the United States and Colonial America. ...


She adopted a culturally conservative stance; her early career being spent as a Goldwater conservative and writing incisive articles in William Buckley's National Review. Didion was infuriated that Ronald Reagan hijacked the 1964 Republican Convention. Perhaps as a reaction to Reagan whom she termed a faux conservative, or as a result of being closely aligned with progressive writers in the New York literary world in which she moved in the seventies, she abandoned her earlier leanings and moved toward the liberal tenets of the Democrats. Didion retains a conservative bent, though, sharply chronicling America after World War II with its endless search for privacy and fulfillment of individual dreams. National Review (NR) is a biweekly magazine of political opinion, founded by author William F. Buckley Jr. ...


Didion is the author of five novels and eight books of nonfiction. Her early collections of essays, Slouching Towards Bethlehem (1968) and The White Album (1979) -- a book described in one review as helping to define California as "the paranoia capital of the world" -- made her famous as an observer of American politics and culture with a distinctive style of reporting that mixed personal reflection and social analysis. This led her to be associated with members of the New Journalism such as Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson, though Didion's ties to that movement have never been considered particularly strong. Joan Didions 1968 collection of essays, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, takes its title from the poem The Second Coming, by W.B. Yeats. ... The White Album is a 1979 book of essays by Joan Didion. ... New Journalism was the name given to a style of 1960s and 1970s news writing and journalism which used literary techniques deemed unconventional at the time. ... Thomas Kennerly Wolfe (born March 2, 1931 in Richmond, Virginia), known as Tom Wolfe, is a best-selling American author and journalist. ... Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005) was an American journalist and author. ...


In 2001 Didion published Political Fictions, a collection of essays which had first appeared in the New York Review of Books. Issues and personalities covered in the essays included The Religious Right, Newt Gingrich, and the Reagan administration. Political Fictions is a 2001 book of essays by Joan Didion on the American political process. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich (born June 17, 1943), Ph. ... President Reagan, with his Cabinet and staff, in the Oval Office (February 4, 1981) Headed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan from 1981 to 1989, the Reagan Administration was conservative, steadfastly anti-Communist and in favor of tax cuts and smaller government. ...


Where I Was From (2003), a memoir, explores the mythologies of California, and the author's relationship to her birthplace and to her mother. Indirectly, it also serves as a rumination on the American frontier myth and the culture that we see today in California as a direct consequence of a population of survivalists who made it "through the Sierra," finally posing the question "at what cost progress?" Where I Was From is a 2003 book of essays by Joan Didion. ...


Didion's latest book, The Year of Magical Thinking, was published October 4, 2005. The book-length essay chronicles the year following her husband's death, during which Didion's daughter, Quintana, was also gravely ill. The book is both a vivid personal account of losing a partner after 40 years of professional collaboration and marriage, and a broader attempt to describe the mechanism that governs grief and mourning. In November 2005, it won the National Book Award for nonfiction. Didion later adapted the memoir into a one-woman play, which premiered on Broadway in 2007. The Year of Magical Thinking (2005), by Joan Didion (b. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Broadway theatre[1] is the most prestigious form of professional theatre in the U.S., as well as the most well known to the general public and most lucrative for the performers, technicians and others involved in putting on the shows. ...


Although Quintana seemed to be getting better during the period the book covers, she died of complications from acute pancreatitis on August 26, 2005, in New York City at age 39 after an extended period of illness. The New York Times reported that Didion would not change the book to reflect her daughter's death. "It's finished," she said.

Contents

Fiction

Run, River is a 1963 novel by Joan Didion, her first. ... Play It As It Lays is a 1970 novel by the American writer Joan Didion. ... For the Anglican prayerbook, see Book of Common Prayer. ... The Last Thing He Wanted is a novel by Joan Didion. ...

Nonfiction

Joan Didions 1968 collection of essays, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, takes its title from the poem The Second Coming, by W.B. Yeats. ... The White Album is a 1979 book of essays by Joan Didion. ... Salvador is a 1983 book of essays by Joan Didion on American involvement in El Salvador. ... Miami is a 1987 book of social and political analysis by Joan Didion. ... After Henry is a 1992 book of essays by Joan Didion. ... Political Fictions is a 2001 book of essays by Joan Didion on the American political process. ... Where I Was From is a 2003 book of essays by Joan Didion. ... The Year of Magical Thinking (2005), by Joan Didion (b. ... We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live: Collected Nonfiction is a 2006 collection of nonfiction by Joan Didion. ...

Drama

  • The Year of Magical Thinking (2007)

External links

  • 1987 audio interview of Joan Didion by Don Swaim
  • 2005 audio interview of Joan Didion by Susan Stamberg of National Public Radio - RealAudio
  • Author interview in Guernica Magazine (Guernicamag.com)
  • CBC: Didion wins U.S. National Book Award
  • The New York Review of Books: Joan Didion
  • The Paris Review Interview with Joan Didion, 1978
  • The Paris Review Interview with Joan Didion, 2006
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Joan Didion

  Results from FactBites:
 
Joan Didion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (548 words)
Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, renowned as a journalist, playwright, essayist, and novelist.
Didion was born in Sacramento, California and graduated from the University of California at Berkeley in 1956 with a BA in English.
Didion attributed her shift in sympathies to the Republican Party's own shift away from what she considered to be the values of Barry Goldwater, whom she had supported in 1964.
Joan Didion: Staking Out California (4857 words)
Joan Didion's California is a place defined not so much by what her unwavering eye observes, but by what her memory cannot let go.
Joan's bedroom is still the faded carnation pink she painted it when she was a freshman at Berkeley, but bougainvillea and ivy have overgrown the windows, giving the chamber a dark, cavelike effect.
Didion says she once believed "that I could live outside history, that the currents of the time in which I lived did not touch or affect me." Then, sometime in 1966, she says, she became "paralyzed by the conviction that the world as I had understood it no longer existed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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