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Encyclopedia > Joan Crawford
Joan Crawford

Joan Crawford in 1948 photo taken by Yousuf Karsh
Born Lucille Fay LeSueur
March 23, 1905(1905-03-23)[1][2]
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Died May 10, 1977 (aged 72)
New York City, New York, USA
Years active 1925 - 1972
Spouse(s) Douglas Fairbanks, Jr (1929-1933)
Franchot Tone (1935-1939)
Phillip Terry (1942-1946)
Alfred Steele (1956-1959)

Joan Crawford (born Lucille Fay LeSueur; (March 23, 1905May 10, 1977)[1][2] was an Academy Award-winning American actress. Crawford is named as the tenth Greatest Female Star of All Time by the American Film Institute. Joan Crawford may refer to: Joan Crawford, an American film actress Joan Crawford (basketball) (born 1937), an American basketballer Joan Crawford (song), a song by the American rock band Blue Öyster Cult on its 1981 album Fire of Unknown Origin Category: ... Image File history File links JoanCrawfordByYousufKarsh. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... San Antonio redirects here. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... New York, New York redirects here. ... Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. ... Franchot Tone (February 27, 1905 – September 18, 1968) was an American actor. ... Phillip Terry (March 7, 1909 - February 23, 1993) was an American actor. ... Alfred Nu Steele (1901 - 1959) was a U.S. drink businessman. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ... Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures Award for Best (Lead) Actress is one of the annual film awards given by the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures. ... Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Part of the AFI 100 Years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Starting as a dancer on Broadway,[3] Crawford was signed to a motion picture contract by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios in 1925 and initially played small parts. She became a famous flapper by the end of the '20s. Beginning in the 1930s, Crawford's fame rivaled fellow MGM colleagues Norma Shearer and Greta Garbo. She often played hardworking young women who find romance and financial success. These "rags to riches" stories were well-received by Depression-era audiences and were popular with women. By the end of the decade, Crawford remained one of Hollywood's most prominent movie stars, and one of the highest paid women in the U.S. For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... A movie studio (aka film studio) is a controlled environment for the making of a motion picture. ... For other uses, see Flapper (disambiguation). ... Edith Norma Shearer (August 10, 1902 (some sources indicate 1900) – June 12, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian-American actress. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Hollywood redirects here. ... A movie star or film star is a celebrity who is a person known for his or her roles in motion pictures. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American...


For her performance in Mildred Pierce Crawford won an Academy Award and in the following years, achieved some of her best reviews. In 1955, she became involved with PepsiCo, the company run by her last husband, Alfred Steele. After his death in 1959, Crawford was elected to fill his vacancy on the board of directors but was forcibly retired in 1973. She continued acting regularly into the 1960s, when her performances became fewer, and after the release of the horror film Trog in 1970, retired from the screen. Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the largest global American beverage and snack company. ... Alfred Nu Steele (1901 - 1959) was a U.S. drink businessman. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Trog is a 1970 Warner Bros. ...

Contents

Early life

Crawford was born Lucille Fay LeSueur in San Antonio, Texas, the third child of Tennessee-born Thomas E. LeSueur (1868–1938) and Anna Bell Johnson (1884–1958). Her older siblings were Daisy LeSueur, who died very young, and Hal LeSueur. Although Crawford was of mostly English descent, her surname originated from her great-great-great-great grandparents, David LeSueur and Elizabeth Chastain, French Huguenots who immigrated from London in the early 1700s to Virginia.[4] San Antonio redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Hal Hays LeSueur (September 3, 1903 – May 3, 1963) was an American actor. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... From the 16th to the 18th century the name Huguenot was applied to a member of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, historically known as the French Calvinists. ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Crawford later said when she was a few months old her father abandoned the family. Her mother later married Henry J. Cassin. The family lived where Cassin ran a movie theater in Lawton, Oklahoma. The 1910 Comanche County, Oklahoma, Federal Census, enumerated on April 20, showed Henry and Anna living at 910 "D" Street in Lawton. Crawford was listed as five years old, thus showing 1905 as her likely year of birth. However, the state of Texas did not require the filing of birth certificates until 1908, allowing Crawford to later claim she was born in 1908. A typical multiplex (AMC Promenade 16 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, United States). ... Lawton is a city in Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Comanche County is a county located in the state of Oklahoma. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ...


Growing up, Crawford preferred the nickname "Billie," and she loved watching vaudeville acts perform on the stage of her stepfather's theater. Her ambition was to be a dancer. However, in an attempt to escape piano lessons to run and play with friends, she leapt from the front porch of her home and cut her foot deeply on a broken milk bottle. Crawford had three operations and was unable to attend elementary school for a year and a half. She eventually fully recovered and returned to dancing. This article is about the musical variety theatre. ... For other uses, see Dance (disambiguation). ...


Around 1916, Crawford's family moved to Kansas City, Missouri. Cassin was first listed in the City Directory in 1917, living at 403 East Ninth Street. While still in elementary school, Crawford was placed in St. Agnes Academy, a Catholic school in Kansas City. Later, after her mother and stepfather broke up, she stayed on at St. Agnes as a work student. She then went to Rockingham Academy as a work student. In 1922, Crawford registered at the posh Stephens College in Columbia, Missouri, and gave her year of birth as 1906. She attended Stephens for less than a year, however, as she recognized that she was not academically prepared for college. Nickname: Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... Stephens College is a liberal arts womens college located in Columbia, Missouri, a city of about 90,000 residents. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: Country United States State Missouri County Boone Government  - Mayor Darwin Hindman Area  - City  59 sq mi (138. ...


Career

Early career

Joan Crawford in 1927
Joan Crawford in 1927

Under the name Lucille LeSueur Crawford began dancing in the chorus line at the Winter Gardens on Broadway in New York City. She wanted additional work and approached Loews Theaters publicist Nils Granlund. Granlund secured LeSueur a position with producer Harry Richmond's act and arranged for her to do a screen test which he sent to producer Harry Rapf in Hollywood. Rapf notified Granlund on December 24, 1924 that a contract would be offered by MGM, and Granlund immediately wired LeSueur - who had returned to her mother's home in Kansas City - with the news and $400 for travel expenses. [5] The night after Christmas she left Kansas City and arrived in Culver City, California. A chorus line is a substantial group of dancers who together perform synchronized routines, usually in musical theatre. ... Winter Gardens may refer to one of the following locations: Winter Gardens, Blackpool, England WInter Gardens, Torquay, Torquay, England Winter Gardens, Great Yarmouth Great Yarmouth, England Winter Gardens, California, USA Sheffield Winter Gardens Margate Winter Gardens, in Kent, UK Sunderland Museum and Winter Gardens Morecambe Winter Gardens, Morecambe Winter Gardens... A view of Broadway in 1909 Broadway, as the name implies, is a wide avenue in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Loews Theaters, founded in 1904 by Marcus Loew, was the oldest theater chain operating in North America until it merged with AMC Theatres on January 26, 2006. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... Motto: The Heart of Screenland Location of Culver City in Los Angeles County, California Coordinates: , Country State County Los Angeles Incorporated (city) 1917-09-07 [2] Government  - City Manager Jerry Fulwood [1] Area  - City  5. ...


As Lucille LeSueur, her first film was in the silent film Pretty Ladies in 1925, which starred ZaSu Pitts. Pretty Ladies was the only time she professionally used her birth name. Crawford is quoted saying it was Sam De Grasse who said her name LeSueur sounded too much like 'sewer.' [6] A female contestant in a fan magazine named, Movie Weekly, entered the name Joan Crawford. Though Crawford reportedly said the name sounded like "crawfish" - and also requested that Joan be pronounced the same as "Joanne" - she eventually chose it as her stage name. Her friend, actor William Haines, quipped, "You're lucky. They could have called you Cranberry and served you up with a Turkey!" A silent film is a film which has no accompanying soundtrack. ... Pretty Ladies is a 1925 film starring Zasu Pitts, and marked the first credited appearance of Lucille Le Sueur. ... ZaSu Pitts (January 3, 1894 – June 7, 1963) (IPA: ) was an American movie actress. ... Pretty Ladies is a 1925 film starring Zasu Pitts, and marked the first credited appearance of Lucille Le Sueur. ... Samuel Alfred De Grace (June 12, 1875 - November 29, 1953) was a Canadian actor. ... For the Okkervil River album, see The Stage Names. ... William Haines as he appeared in his first part-talkie Alias Jimmy Valentine in 1928. ...


Crawford first made an impression on audiences in Edmund Goulding's Sally, Irene and Mary (1925), in which she played Irene, a struggling chorus girl. In the same year, Crawford worked on Lady of the Night, starring Norma Shearer. As Crawford was made up and used as a double for Shearer, her face is briefly seen. Because of how well Shearer was treated compared to herself, Crawford resented Shearer. The following year, Crawford was named one of the WAMPAS Baby Stars, along with Mary Astor, Mary Brian, Dolores Costello, Dolores Del Rio, Janet Gaynor and Fay Wray. For the next two years, Crawford appeared in increasingly important movies. In 1926, she made Paris, where she was able to show her sex appeal. She became the romantic interest for some of MGM's leading male stars, among them Ramon Novarro, William Haines, John Gilbert and Tim McCoy. Edmund Goulding (March 20, 1891 - December 21, 1959) was, among other things, an English-born film director. ... Sally, Irene, and Mary is a 1925 film starring Constance Bennett, Sally ONeil, and Joan Crawford. ... Lady of the Night is a 1925 American sentimental silent drama film directed by Monta Bell. ... Edith Norma Shearer (August 10, 1902 (some sources indicate 1900) – June 12, 1983) was an Academy Award-winning Canadian-American actress. ... The WAMPAS Baby Stars of 1932. ... Mary Astor (May 3, 1906 – September 25, 1987) was an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Mary Brian (February 17, 1906 – December 30, 2002) was an American actress and movie star who made the transition from silents to talkies. ... Dolores Costello (September 17, 1905 – March 1, 1979)[1] was an American film actress who achieved her greatest success during the era of silent movies. ... Dolores Del Rio Dolores del Río (August 3, 1905 - April 11, 1983) was a Mexican film actress. ... Janet Gaynor (October 6, 1906 – September 14, 1984) was an American actress who, in 1928, became the first winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress for her three most prominent films: Sunrise (1927), Seventh Heaven (1927), and Street Angel (1928). ... Vina Fay Wray (September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004) was a Canadian–American actress. ... Ramón Novarro (February 6, 1899 – October 30, 1968) was a Mexican actor who achieved fame as a Latin lover in silent films. ... William Haines as he appeared in his first part-talkie Alias Jimmy Valentine in 1928. ... John Gilbert John Gilbert (July 10, 1899 - January 9, 1936) was an actor and major star of the silent film era. ... Tim McCoy (born April 10, 1891 - died January 29, 1978 ) was an American actor. ...

Joan Crawford in 1928
Joan Crawford in 1928

Crawford's appeared in The Unknown (1927), starring Lon Chaney, Sr. who played a carnival knife thrower with no arms. Crawford played his skimpily clad young carnival assistant whom he hopes to marry. She stated that she learned more about acting from watching Chaney work in this movie than from anything else in her long career. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 406 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (797 × 1177 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date September 26, 1928 Author Bain News Service Permission (Reusing this image) Other versions Full version File historyClick on a date/time to view the... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 406 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (797 × 1177 pixel, file size: 65 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Date September 26, 1928 Author Bain News Service Permission (Reusing this image) Other versions Full version File historyClick on a date/time to view the... The Unknown (1927) was a silent horror film directed by Tod Browning and featuring Lon Chaney as carnival knife thrower Alonzo the Armless and Joan Crawford as the scantily clad carnival girl he hopes to marry. ... Lon Chaney (April 1, 1883 – August 26, 1930), nicknamed The Man of a Thousand Faces, was an American actor during the age of silent films. ...


In 1928, Crawford starred opposite Ramon Novarro, as Priscilla Crowninshield in Across to Singapore, but it was her role as Diana Medford in Our Dancing Daughters (1928) that catapulted her to stardom. The role established her as a symbol of modern 1920s-style femininity that rivaled the image of Clara Bow, who was then Hollywood's foremost flapper. A stream of hits followed Our Dancing Daughters, including two more flapper-themed movies, in which Crawford embodied for her legion of fans (many of whom were women) an idealized vision of the free-spirited, all-American girl. Ramón Novarro (February 6, 1899 – October 30, 1968) was a Mexican actor who achieved fame as a Latin lover in silent films. ... Across to Singapore is a 1928 silent film by director William Nigh starring Joan Crawford and Ramon Novarro. ... A film from the late twenties. ... Clara Gordon Bow (July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965) was an American actress and sex symbol who rose to fame in the silent film era of the 1920s. ... For other uses, see Flapper (disambiguation). ...


To rid herself of her Southwestern accent Crawford tirelessly studied diction and elocution. Her first talkie was Untamed (1929), opposite Robert Montgomery, which was a box office success. Crawford made an effective transition to sound movies. One critic wrote, "Miss Crawford sings appealingly and dances thrillingly as usual; her voice is alluring and her dramatic efforts in the difficult role she portrays are at all times convincing." The Southwest could be defined as the states south, or for the most part west of the Mississippi River, with the qualification of a certain northern limit, such as the 37, or 38, or 39, or 40 degree north line. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Diction, in its original and primary meaning, is the term for a writer or speakers distinctive choices in vocabulary and style of expression. ... Elocution is proper speaking in pronunciation, grammar, style, and tone. ... 1902 poster advertising Gaumonts sound films, depicting an optimistically vast auditorium A sound film is a motion picture with synchronized sound, or sound technologically coupled to image, as opposed to a silent film. ... Untamed is a 1929 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer drama/comedy/romance motion picture starring Joan Crawford and Robert Montgomery. ... Robert Montgomery (May 21, 1904 – September 27, 1981) was an American actor and director. ... The term box office can refer to either: A place where tickets are sold to the public for admission to a venue The amount of business a particular production, such as a movie or theatre show, does. ...


MGM

from the film Rain (1932)
from the film Rain (1932)

Crawford starred opposite of Clark Gable in Possessed (1931). They began an affair during the production, resulting in an ultimatum from studio chief Louis B. Mayer to Gable that the affair end. Gable complied, although for many years their affair resumed sporadically and secretly. Upon release, Possessed was an enormous hit. Rain DVD cover Rain is a 1932 Pre-Code film directed by Lewis Milestone. ... William Clark Gable (February 1, 1901 – November 16, 1960) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ... Possessed is a 1931 MGM film produced and directed by Clarence Brown, and co-produced by Harry Rapf and Irving Thalberg. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The studio then cast her in Grand Hotel, which starred the most famous actors of the 1930s and was the MGMs most prestigious movie of 1932. Crawford later achieved continued success with Letty Lynton (1932). Although, soon after its release a plagiarism case forced MGM to withdraw it and it has never been shown on television or made available on VHS/DVD, and is therefore considered the "lost" Crawford film. The film is mostly remembered because of the Letty Lynton dress, designed by Adrian: a white cotton organdy gown with large ruffled sleeves, puffed at the shoulder. It was with this gown that Crawford's broad shoulders began to be accentuated by costume; this would become a trademark for the actress along with, later in her career, emphasized eyebrows and ankle strap shoes. Macy's copied the Letty Lynton dress in 1932 and it sold over 500,000 replicas nationwide.[7] Grand Hotel is a 1932 art deco movie, and is considered as a classic of the sort. ... Letty Lynton is a 1932 MGM film starring Joan Crawford, Robert Montgomery, and Nils Asther. ... For other uses, see Plagiarism (disambiguation). ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Norma Shearer in an Adrian gown. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ...


Following Possessed, Crawford starred opposite of Gable in the rollicking smash hit Dancing Lady (1933), in which Crawford received top billing. Crawford's next movies, Sadie McKee (1934) and Forsaking All Others (also '34), were among the top money makers of the mid-1930s, and marked her peak as a popular star at the box office for MGM. Dancing Lady is a 1933 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer musical comedy film starring Joan Crawford, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone, as well as Robert Benchley, Nelson Eddy, Fred Astaire, and Ted Healy and his Three Stooges. ... Sadie McKee is a 1934 movie, directed by Clarence Brown and starring Joan Crawford, Gene Raymond, Franchot Tone and Edward Arnold. ... Forsaking All Others is a 1934 film starring, Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, Robert Montgomery, and Rosalind Russell. ...

from the trailer for The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1937)

By the end of the decade Crawford's characters were defined as much by their glamorous clothing, accessories, and styled hair and make-up as by any character trait.[citation needed] However, eventually Crawford's movies began to lose money. She was labeled "box-office poison" along with Katharine Hepburn, Greta Garbo, Marlene Dietrich, Mae West and Fred Astaire in 1938. Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Greta Garbo (September 18, 1905 – April 15, 1990) was a Swedish-born actress during Hollywoods silent film period and part of its Golden Age. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born American actress, singer and entertainer. ... MAE-West is a major Internet peering point located in San Jose, California. ... Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987), born Frederick Austerlitz in Omaha, Nebraska,[1] was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer and actor. ...

from the trailer for The Women (1939)
from the trailer for The Women (1939)

However, Crawford made a small comeback with her role as bitchy home-wrecker Crystal Allen in director George Cukor's huge comedy success The Women in 1939. She also broke from formula by taking the unglamorous role of Julie in Strange Cargo (1940), her eigth and final film with Clark Gable. Crawford then starred as a facially disfigured blackmailer in A Woman's Face (1941). While the film was only a moderate box office success, her performance was hailed by many critics. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Women is a 1939 comedy film directed by George Cukor. ... George Dewey Cukor (July 7, 1899 – January 24, 1983) was an American film director. ... The Women is a 1939 comedy film directed by George Cukor. ... A Womans Face is a 1941 MGM film based on the play, Il Etait Une Fois by Francis De Croisset. ...


Eager to promote new actors Greer Garson, Lana Turner, Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr and the resurgent Katharine Hepburn, the MGM management began to view Crawford as a bad investment.[citation needed] After eighteen years Crawford's contract was terminated by mutual consent on June 29, 1943. In lieu of one more movie owed under her contract, MGM bought out her contract for $100,000. The same day, the studio cleared out her bungalow. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Lana Turner (February 8, 1921 – June 29, 1995) was an Academy award-nominated American film actress. ... Judy Garland (born Frances Ethel Gumm; June 10, 1922 - June 22, 1969) was an Academy Award-nominated American film actress and singer, best known for her role as Dorothy Gale in The Wizard of Oz (1939). ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Move to Warner Bros.

For five hundred thousand dollars for three movies, Crawford signed with Warner Bros. and was placed on the payroll on July 1, 1943. She made a cameo with many other stars in the G.I. morale-booster Hollywood Canteen (1944). “WB” redirects here. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Crawford wanted to play the title role in Mildred Pierce (1945), but Bette Davis was the studio's first choice. However, Davis did not want to play the mother of a seventeen year old daughter (Ann Blyth), and she turned the role down. Director Michael Curtiz didn't want Crawford and told Jack Warner, "With her high-hat airs and her goddamn shoulder pads, she's a has-been." Following Barbara Stanwyck's success in Double Indemnity (1944), also based on a James M. Cain novel, Curtiz bent to Warner's demand. However, Curtiz demanded Crawford prove her suitability by taking a screen test. After the test, Curtiz agreed to Crawford's casting. Crawford starred opposite Jack Carson, Zachary Scott, Eve Arden, Ann Blyth and Butterfly McQueen. Mildred Pierce was a commercial success. It epitomized the lush visual style and the hard-boiled film noir sensibility that defined Warner Bros. movies of the late 1940s. Crawford earned the Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role. Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... This article is about the actress. ... Ann Blyth Ann Marie Blyth (born August 16, 1928 in Mount Kisco, New York) is an American actress and singer, most often cast in Hollywood musicals, but who also succeeded in the dramatic roles she was given. ... Michael Curtiz (December 24, 1886 - April 10, 1962) was an Academy Award-winning Hungarian-American film director. ... Barbara Stanwyck (July 16, 1907 – January 20, 1990) was a four-time Academy Award-nominated, three-time Emmy Award-winning, and Golden Globe-winning American actress of film, stage, and screen. ... This article is about the 1944 film. ... James Mallahan Cain (July 1, 1892 – October 27, 1977) was an American journalist and novelist. ... Jack Carson (October 27, 1910 – January 3, 1963 was a Canadian actor. ... Zachary Scott (Austin, Texas February 24, 1914 – October 3, 1965 also in Austin from a brain tumour) was an American actor, most notable for his roles as villains and mystery men. He was a distant cousin of both George Washington and Bat Masterson. ... Eve Arden (April 30, 1908 – November 12, 1990) was an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning American actress, who established a lengthy career as a supporting and character actor rather than as a lead actress due, in large part, to the fact, that while tall and slim, she was not... Ann Blyth Ann Marie Blyth (born August 16, 1928 in Mount Kisco, New York) is an American actress and singer, most often cast in Hollywood musicals, but who also succeeded in the dramatic roles she was given. ... Butterfly McQueen Butterfly McQueen (January 7, 1911 – December 22, 1995) was an American film and television actress. ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role is one of the Academy Awards of Merit presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognize an actress who has delivered an outstanding performance while working within the film industry. ...


Crawford said one of the main reasons she signed with Warner Bros. was because she wanted to play the character "Mattie" in a proposed 1944 film version of Edith Wharton's novel Ethan Frome (1911). However, Davis wanted to play Mattie and reportedly told Jack Warner, "Joan's far too old, and besides, she can't act." Edith Wharton (January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was an American novelist, short story writer, and designer. ... Ethan Frome is a novel that was released in 1911 by the Pulitzer Prize-winning American author Edith Wharton. ...


Time To Sing (1947) was the a proposed film telling the story of two retired stage actresses who team up for a tour of summer stock theatres, similar to RKO's Stage Door (1937), starring Katharine Hepburn and Ginger Rogers. The project was intended to team Crawford with Davis, however, it was never made.[8]. Summer Stock is also the title of a 1950 musical motion picture starring Judy Garland. ... Stage Door is a 1937 film that tells the story of several would-be actresses who live together in a single boarding house. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an American actress of film, television and stage. ... Ginger Rogers (Virginia Katherine McMath, July 16, 1911 – April 25, 1995) was an Academy Award-winning American film and stage actress and singer. ...


Caged (1950) was a prison drama based on the novel Women Without Men by Virginia Kellogg. The story surrounded a female prison warden who attempts to rehabilitate a prisoner before she becomes a hardened criminal. In 1973, Crawford said, "I knew of a women's prison picture; it was written by Virginia Kellogg and later became Caged [1950] with Eleanor Parker and Agnes Moorehead." This too was intended to pair Crawford with Davis, who made it clear that she would not be starring in any "dyke movie".[9] Virginia Kellogg (December 3, 1907 - April 8, 1981) was a two-time Oscar nominated film writer. ... Caged is a 1950 film which tells the story of a young woman who is sent to prison for being an accessory to a robbery. ... Eleanor Jean Parker (born June 26, 1922) is an American film and television actress. ... Agnes Robertson Moorehead (December 6, 1900 – April 30, 1994) was an Oscar-nominated American character actress. ...


Crawford and Davis did not appear together in a motion picture until the 1962 film, What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a 1962 Warner Bros. ...

Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce (1945)
Joan Crawford in Mildred Pierce (1945)

From 1945-1952, Crawford reigned as a top star and respected actress, appearing in such roles as Helen Wright in Humoresque (1946), Louise Howell Graham in Possessed (1947, for which she was nominated for a second Oscar as Best Actress) and the title role in Daisy Kenyon (also 1947). Mildred Pierce is an American film noir released in 1945 and directed by Michael Curtiz. ... Humoresque is a 1946 film melodrama made by Warner Bros. ... Possessed is a 1947 film noir which tells the story of a woman who walks the streets of Los Angeles, calling for a man named David. Taken to a mental hospital, the story of her obsession for the man named David is told in flashbacks. ... Daisy Kenyon (1947) is a romantic melodrama starring Joan Crawford, Henry Fonda and Dana Andrews as three people involved in a romantic triangle in postwar New York City. ...


Crawford's other movie roles of the era include Lane Bellamy in Flamingo Road (1949), a dual role in the film noir The Damned Don't Cry (1950) and her performance in the title role of Harriet Craig (1950) at Columbia Pictures. After filming This Woman Is Dangerous (1952), Crawford asked to be released from her Warner Bros. contract. As she had done so before, Crawford triumphed as Myra Hudson in Sudden Fear (1952) at RKO, which was also the movie that introduced her co-star, Jack Palance, to the screen and earned Crawford a third and final Oscar nomination for Best Actress. Flamingo Road is a 1949 film starring Joan Crawford, Zachary Scott, Sydney Greenstreet and David Brian. ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... The Damned Dont Cry! is a 1950 black-and-white film noir. ... Harriet Craig (1950) is a drama film about domineering Harriet Craig who holds more regard for her home and its possessions than she does for any person in her life. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... This Woman is Dangerous is a 1952 film starring Joan Crawford. ... Sudden Fear is a 1952 film noir which tells the story of an actor who attempts to seduce a female film director in order to prove to her that he can play a romantic lead. ... RKO could stand for: RKO Pictures The R.K.O. - finishing manoever (and initials) of WWE professional wrestler Randy Orton. ... Jack Palance (February 18, 1919 - November 10, 2006) was an Academy Award-winning American film actor. ...


Radio and television

Crawford worked in the radio The Screen Guild Theater on January 8, 1939; Good News; Baby, broadcast March 2, 1940 on Arch Oboler's Lights Out; The Word on Everyman's Theater (1941); Chained on the Lux Radio Theater and Norman Corwin's Document A/777 (1948). The Screen Guild Theater was a popular radio anthology series during the Golden Age of Radio that began airing on the CBS network on January 8, 1939 and lasted for fourteen seasons and 527 episodes. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... -1... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arch Oboler was a writer, producer, director active in both radio and television. ... Wyllis Cooper Lights Out was an American old-time radio program featuring tales of the supernatural and the supernormal. ... Lux Radio Theater, one of the genuine classic radio anthology series (NBC Blue Network (1934-1935); CBS (1935-1954); NBC (1954-1955)) adapted first Broadway stage works, and then (especially) films to hour-long live radio presentations. ... Norman Lewis Corwin (born May 3, 1910) is an American writer, screenwriter, producer, essayist and teacher of journalism and writing. ...


She appeared numerous times in episodes of anthology TV shows in the 1950s and, in 1959, made a pilot for her series, The Joan Crawford Show, but the show was never picked up by a network. A television pilot is the first episode of an intended television series. ...


Work at Pepsi

Crawford traveled extensively on behalf of husband Al Steele's company, Pepsi Cola Company. Two days after Steele's death in 1959, Crawford was elected to fill his vacancy on the board of directors. PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the largest global American beverage and snack company. ... Chairman of the Board redirects here. ...


Crawford was the recipient of the sixth annual "Pally Award," which was in the shape of a bronze Pepsi bottle. It was awarded to the employee making the most significant contribution to company sales.


In 1973, Crawford retired from the company at the behest of company executive Don Kendall, whom Crawford had referred to for years as "Fang." Donald M. Kendall, during the administration of US President Nixon, was the CEO of PepsiCo. ...


Later career

After her triumph in RKO's Sudden Fear (1952), Crawford continued her career, with films ranging from the cult western film Johnny Guitar (1954) to the drama Autumn Leaves (1956), opposite a young Cliff Robertson. By the early 1960s, however, Crawford's status in motion pictures had diminished. Sudden Fear is a 1952 film noir which tells the story of an actor who attempts to seduce a female film director in order to prove to her that he can play a romantic lead. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Johnny Guitar is a 1954 Western, famed for its unusual storyline and colourful cinematography. ... Autumn Leaves is a 1956 American feature film directed by Robert Aldrich and written by Jean Rouverol and Hugo Butler. ... Cliff Robertson. ...

Crawford's starred as "Blanche Hudson," a physically disabled woman and former A-list movie star in conflict with her psychotic sister in the highly successful thriller, What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? (1962). Despite the actresses' earlier tensions, Crawford suggested Bette Davis for the role of Jane. The movie became a blockbuster. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a 1962 Warner Bros. ... The A-list is the roster of the most bankable movie stars in Hollywood. ... A movie star or film star is a celebrity who is a person known for his or her roles in motion pictures. ... For other uses, see Psychosis (disambiguation). ... What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? is a 1962 Warner Bros. ...


Crawford played Lucretia Terry in the United Artists movie The Caretakers (1963). For her performance in What Ever Happened To Baby Jane? Davis was nominated for an Academy Award that year. Crawford secretly contacted all the other Oscar nominees to tell them if they were unable to attend the ceremony, she would be happy to accept the Oscar on their behalf. Both Davis and Crawford were backstage when the absent Anne Bancroft was announced as the winner. That same year, Crawford starred as Lucy Harbin in William Castle's horror/mystery Strait-Jacket (1964). This article is about the film studio. ... The Caretakers is a 1963 United Artists drama motion picture starring Robert Stack and Polly Bergen. ... Anne Bancroft (September 17, 1931 – June 6, 2005) was an iconic Academy, Tony, and Emmy Award-winning American actress. ... William Castle (April 24, 1914–May 31, 1977) born William Schloss, was an American film director, producer, and actor. ... Horror Movie redirects here. ... Mystery film is a film genre which uses mystery as an element to the plot. ... A straitjacket is a garment shaped like a jacket with overlong sleeves. ...


Aldrich cast Crawford and Davis in Hush... Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964). However, Crawford entered a hospital and after a prolonged absence Aldrich was forced to replace her with Olivia de Havilland. There is a long shot in the beginning of the movie, when Miriam gets out of the taxi upon her arrival at the Hollis plantation, that actually shows the back of Joan Crawford's head and not de Havilland's. "When the taxi pulls up with cousin Miriam inside and stops at the foot of the steps, if you look closely before Miriam gets out you can just for a split moment see it is fact Joan Crawford in the back and not Olivia de Havilland. You can't see Crawford's face but you can tell it's her by the black dress and dark sunglasses that she is wearing. When de Haviland as Miriam is seen in the taxi before she arrives she is wearing a white hat and her clothing is light colored." Hush. ... Olivia Mary de Havilland (born July 1, 1916) is a two-time Academy Award winning actress in American motion pictures and is the last surviving principal cast member from Gone with the Wind. ...


Upon her release from the hospital Crawford played the role of Amy Nelson in I Saw What You Did (1965), another William Castle vehicle. She starred as Monica Rivers in Herman Cohen's horror/thriller Berserk! (1968). After the film's release, Crawford guest-starred as herself on The Lucy Show. The episode, "Lucy and the Lost Star," caused much celebrity fodder as during filming title star Lucille Ball had a very public feud with Crawford. According to Ball, Crawford was often drunk on the set and could not memorize her lines. Ball was said to have requested several times to replace Crawford with Gloria Swanson, who was supposed to have originally filled the role, but bowed out at the last minute. When asked during an interview how she had liked working with Ball, Crawford's response was, "And they call me a bitch!" I Saw What You Did is a 1965 Universal Pictures horror/thriller motion picture starring Joan Crawford, John Ireland, Leif Erickson, Sara Lane, Andi Garrett, Sharyl Locke, Patricia Breslin, John Archer, and Joyce Meadows. ... Herman Cohen (August 27, 1925 - June 2, 2002) was a producer of B-movies during the 1950s, who helped to popularize the teen horror movie genre with films like the cult classic I Was a Teenage Werewolf. ... Berserk! is a 1968 Columbia Pictures horror/thriller/mystery motion picture starring Joan Crawford and Ty Hardin. ... This article is about the television series. ... Lucille Désirée Ball (August 6, 1911 – April 26, 1989) was an iconic American comedienne, film, television, stage and radio actress, glamour girl and star of the landmark sitcoms I Love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show and Heres Lucy. ... Gloria Swanson (March 27, 1899 – April 4, 1983) was an Academy Award-nominated, Golden Globe-winning American Hollywood actress. ...


In October 1968, Crawford's 29-year-old daughter, Christina (who was then acting in New York on the TV soap opera The Secret Storm), needed immediate medical attention due to a ruptured ovarian tumor. Until Christina was well enough to return, Crawford offered to play her role, which the producer readily agreed to. The implausibility of Crawford (then 63) playing a 28-year-old woman was coupled by her apparent state of intoxication on the live telecast. Christina was fired from the role the following year. In her memoir, Mommie Dearest, Christina claimed her mother's behavior contributed to her firing. A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... The first TIME magazine cover devoted to soap operas, dated January 12, 1976. ... The Secret Storm title card from 1960. ... Original book cover Mommie Dearest is a memoir and exposé written by Christina Crawford, the adopted daughter of actress Joan Crawford. ...


Crawford's appearance in the 1969 TV film Night Gallery (which served as pilot to the series that followed), marked one of Steven Spielberg's earliest directing jobs. Night Gallery was Rod Serlings follow-up to The Twilight Zone, airing on NBC from 1970 to 1973. ... Steven Allan Spielberg, (Honorary KBE, born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ...


Crawford starred on the big screen one final time, playing Dr. Brockton in Herman Cohen's sci-fi/horror Trog (1970), rounding out a career spanning 45 years and over 80 motion pictures. Herman Cohen (August 27, 1925 - June 2, 2002) was a producer of B-movies during the 1950s, who helped to popularize the teen horror movie genre with films like the cult classic I Was a Teenage Werewolf. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Trog is a 1970 Warner Bros. ...


Crawford made four more TV appearances, as Stephanie White in an episode of The Virginian (1970), entitled "The Nightmare"; as a board member in an episode of The Name of the Game (1971), entitled "Los Angeles"; as Allison Hayes in the made-for-TV movie Beyond the Water's Edge (1972); and as Joan Fairchild (her final screen performance) on an episode of the television series, The Sixth Sense, entitled, "Dear Joan: We're Going To Scare You To Death" (1972). The Virginian was a Western-themed television series which aired on NBC from 1962 to 1971. ... The Name of the Game was a television series that ran for seventy-six episodes of 90 minutes each on NBC, filmed from 1968 to 1971. ... “Telefilm” redirects here. ... The Sixth Sense was a short-lived TV series starring Gary Collins and Catherine Ferrar. ...


Personal life

Marriages and residences

In 1929, at the time she wed Douglas Fairbanks Jr. at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York, Crawford purchased a mansion at 426 North Bristol Avenue in Brentwood, located midway between Beverly Hills and the Pacific Ocean. The home would be her primary residence for the next 26 years. During that period, Crawford had her home decorated and redecorated by William Haines, her former silent movie co-star and lifelong friend, who was much in demand as an interior designer after receiving Crawford's recommendation. Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. ... This article is about the neighborhood in Los Angeles. ... William Haines as he appeared in his first part-talkie Alias Jimmy Valentine in 1928. ...


Crawford had four husbands: actors Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (married June 3, 1929 in New York-divorced 1933); Franchot Tone (married October 11, 1935 in New Jersey-divorced 1939); Phillip Terry (married July 21, 1942 at Hidden Valley Ranch in Ventura County, California-divorced 1946); and Pepsi-Cola president Alfred N. Steele (married May 10, 1955 in Las Vegas, Nevada-his death 1959). Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. ... -1... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the state. ... Franchot Tone (February 27, 1905 – September 18, 1968) was an American actor. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Phillip Terry (March 7, 1909 - February 23, 1993) was an American actor. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ventura County . ... Alfred Nu Steele (1901 - 1959) was a U.S. drink businessman. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... For further information, see Las Vegas metropolitan area and Las Vegas Strip. ...


Crawford moved to a lavish penthouse apartment at 2 East 70th St. with her last husband, Alfred Steele. He died there on April 19, 1959. Crawford then sold her Brentwood mansion and stayed in New York, moving to a smaller apartment, number 22-G in the Imperial House. She later moved to a smaller apartment in the same building (Apt.# 22-H) where she died, aged 72. She kept a small apartment in Los Angeles for her frequent trips there. Crawford was well-known for her relationship with her fans, often sending thousands of handwritten replies to fan letters each month. She also worked tirelessly with her official fan club, which disappeared after her death. It was re-established in 2007.[1] Alfred Nu Steele (1901 - 1959) was a U.S. drink businessman. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Adopted children

In 1940, as a single, divorced woman, Crawford adopted Christina (born June 11, 1939). Christina Crawford (born June 11, 1939) is an American actress and writer, best known as the author of Mommie Dearest, an exposé of the systematic child abuse allegedly committed by her mother, actress Joan Crawford. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


She also adopted a boy named Christopher (born April 1941), who, in 1942, was reclaimed by his biological mother.


The third child was Christopher Terry (born 1943). Crawford and Philip Terry adopted him that same year but she changed his name to Christopher Crawford after she and Terry divorced. According to Christina, Crawford changed his birth date because she was afraid he would be taken away. He died of cancer on September 22, 2006 in Greenport, New York. Phillip Terry (March 7, 1909 - February 23, 1993) was an American actor. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Greenport isnt the name of several places in the U.S. state of New York:it is home to the kangarooInsert non-formatted text here Greenport, Columbia County, New York [[Greenport, Suffolk County, New York] ...


She adopted twin girls Cynthia "Cindy" Crawford and Catherine "Cathy" Crawford (born January 13, 1947). Crawford adopted them in June of that year. They were born in Dyersburg, Tennessee, to an unwed mother who died seven days after their birth. It was said that Crawford was afraid their biological parents might try to reclaim them and therefore claimed they were not twins. Cynthia died on October 14, 2007 in Fort Worth, Texas from complications following a liver transplant. is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee Coordinates: Cities in Tennessee Tennessee Mayor John Holden Area    - City 39. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Nickname: Motto: Where the West Begins Location of Fort Worth in Tarrant County, Texas Coordinates: , Country State Counties Tarrant, Denton Government  - Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Area  - City 298. ...


Religion

Crawford was raised Catholic by her stepfather, Henry Cassin, a Roman Catholic (although he and Crawford's mother ultimately divorced). Crawford insisted on marrying Douglas Fairbanks, Jr., who was not Catholic, at St. Patrick's Cathedral in New York City. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Douglas Elton Fairbanks, Jr. ...


By the late 1930s, Crawford attended The Church of Christ, Scientist. She would bring her adopted children to that church regularly, but not always weekly. Although Crawford practiced Christian Science, she sought medical care for herself and her children when necessary. The factual accuracy of this article is disputed. ... Christian Science is a religious teaching regarding the efficacy of spiritual healing according to the interpretation of the Bible by Mary Baker Eddy, in her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (first published in 1875). ...


Christina Crawford attended the Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy For Girls for her junior and senior years of high school, along with the daughters of non-Catholic actresses Virginia Field and Lana Turner. Christina Crawford stated in her memoir, Mommie Dearest, that the Catholic doctrines she was taught came as a shock following her experiences with Christian Science. Christina also stated in Mommie Dearest that Crawford considered herself a Catholic despite the fact that she had stopped practicing the faith nearly 50 years before her death. Flintridge Sacred Heart Academy is a private all-girls Catholic High School run by the Dominican sisters of Mission San Jose. ... London-born Virginia Field (November 4, 1917-January 2, 1992) was a film actress. ... Lana Turner (February 8, 1921 – June 29, 1995) was an Academy award-nominated American film actress. ...


Final years and death

In 1970, Crawford was presented with the Cecil B. DeMille Award by John Wayne on the Golden Globes, which was telecast from the Coconut Grove at The Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. She also spoke at her alma mater, Stephens College, from which she never graduated. The Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures has been given annually since 1952 by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association at the Golden Globe Award ceremonies in Hollywood, California. ... For other persons named John Wayne, see John Wayne (disambiguation). ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... The Ambassador Hotel was a landmark hotel in Los Angeles, California. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ...


A Portrait of Joan, an autobiography written with Jane Kesner Ardmore, was published in 1962 by Doubleday. Crawford's next book, My Way of Life, was published in 1971 by Simon and Schuster. Those expecting a racy tell-all were disappointed, although Crawford's meticulous ways were revealed in her advice on grooming, wardrobe, exercise, and even food storage. Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ...


In September 1973, Crawford moved from apartment 22-G to the smaller apartment 22-H in the Imperial House. Her last public appearance was September 23, 1974, at a party honoring her old friend Rosalind Russell at New York's Rainbow Room. Russell was battling breast cancer at the time and died two years later in 1976. On May 8, 1977, Crawford gave away her beloved Shih Tzu "Princess Lotus Blossom," which signaled to her close friends that her death was near. is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Rosalind Russell (June 4, 1907 – November 28, 1976) was a four-time Academy Award nominated and Tony Award winning American film and stage actress, perhaps best known for her role as a fast-talking newspaper reporter in the Howard Hawks screwball comedy His Girl Friday. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Shih Tzu (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Shih-tzu Kou; literally Lion Dog), in English pronounced shee tsoo), is a dog breed which originated in China. ...


Crawford died two days later at her New York apartment from a heart attack, while also ill with pancreatic cancer.[2] According to her daughter Christina, Crawford's alleged last words were "Damn it...Don't you dare ask God to help me," which were directed at her housekeeper, who had begun to pray out loud.[10] However, other sources indicate that Crawford was found dead on the bedroom floor by her housemaid. A funeral was held at Campbell Funeral Home, New York, on May 10, 1977. All four of her adopted children attended, as did her niece, Joan Crawford LeSueur (aka Joan Lowe), who was the daughter of her late brother, Hal LeSueur (died in 1963). In her will, which was signed October 28, 1976, Crawford bequeathed to her two youngest children, Cindy and Cathy, $77,500 each from her $2,000,000 estate. However, she explicitly disinherited the two eldest, Christina and Christopher. In the last paragraph of the will, she wrote, "It is my intention to make no provision herein for my son Christopher or my daughter Christina for reasons which are well known to them." Heart attack redirects here. ... Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor of the pancreas. ... The Last Words - Malcolm Baxter (vocals), Andy Groome (guitar), Leigh Kendall (bass), John Gunn (drums) - were one of the first Australian punk bands. ... This article is about the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Hal Hays LeSueur (September 3, 1903 – May 3, 1963) was an American actor. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


A memorial service was held for Crawford at All Souls' Unitarian Church on Lexington Avenue in New York on May 16, 1977, and was attended by, among others, her old Hollywood friend Myrna Loy. Another memorial service, organized by George Cukor, was held on June 24 in the Samuel Goldwyn Theater at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Myrna Loy (August 2, 1905 – December 14, 1993) was an American motion picture actress. ... Fairbanks Center for Motion Picture Study building on La Cienega Boulevard in Beverly Hills, California Pickford Center for Motion Picture Study in the Hollywood, district. ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ...


Crawford was cremated and her ashes placed in a crypt with her last husband, Al Steele, in Ferncliff Cemetery, Hartsdale, New York. Cremation is the practice of disposing of a corpse by burning. ... Secor Road at Ferncliff Cemetery Ferncliff Cemetery and Mausoleum is located on Secor Road in the hamlet of Hartsdale, town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York, about 25 miles north of Midtown Manhattan. ... Hartsdale is an unincorporated census-designated place (CDP) located in the town of Greenburgh, Westchester County, New York. ...


Crawford's hand and footprints are immortalized in the forecourt of Grauman's Chinese Theater on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood. She also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1750 Vine Street. In 1999, Playboy listed Crawford as one of the "100 Sexiest Women of the 20th century," ranking her #84. This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Hollywood Boulevard as taken from the Kodak Theatre Hollywood Boulevard is an avenue in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States, beginning at Sunset Boulevard in the east and running northwest to Vermont Avenue, where it straightens out and runs due west to Laurel Canyon Boulevard. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... Buskers perform on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ...


Mommie Dearest

A year and a half after Crawford's death, Christina published a bestseller exposé entitled Mommie Dearest which contained allegations that Crawford was emotionally and physically abusive to her and her brother Christopher. Though many of Crawford's friends, as well as her other two daughters, harshly criticized and disputed the book's claims[citation needed], while others supported the book's contents and her reputation was somewhat tarnished.[citation needed] The book was later made into the 1981 film Mommie Dearest, starring Faye Dunaway as Crawford, the film differing significantly in tone from the more serious memoir. It has been said that this movie was the beginning of the end of Dunaway's career, who enjoyed a massive success in the 70s with such now classics like Network. Dunaway has stated that this was indeed the film that somewhat killed her career[citation needed], and therefore refused to promote its re-releases, now marketed as "a camp classic" by the studio. In the year of its release, Mommie Dearest won 5 of the 9 Razzies (Golden Rapsberry Award, given to "the very worst of film") it was nominated for, including Worst Picture, Worst Actress, Worst Screenplay, Worst Supporting Actor and Worst Supporting Actress. The movie is now regarded as one of the "campiest films of all time."[citation needed] Original book cover Mommie Dearest is a memoir and exposé written by Christina Crawford, the adopted daughter of actress Joan Crawford. ... Image File history File links MommieDearestBook. ... Image File history File links MommieDearestBook. ... A bestseller is a book that is identified as extremely popular by its inclusion on lists of currently top selling titles that are based on publishing industry and booktrade figures and published by newspapers, magazines, or bookstore chains. ... Original book cover Mommie Dearest is a memoir and exposé written by Christina Crawford, the adopted daughter of actress Joan Crawford. ... Child abuse is the physical, psychological or sexual abuse or neglect of children. ... Mommie Dearest is a 1981 Paramount biopic about Joan Crawford, starring Faye Dunaway. ... Faye Dunaway (born January 14, 1941, in Bascom, Florida) is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Network is a 1976 satirical New Hollywood film about a fictional television network, Union Broadcasting System (UBS), and its struggle with poor ratings. ... Campy redirects here. ...


Filmography

Main article: Joan Crawford filmography

References

  1. ^ a b For most of her life, Crawford maintained that she was born in 1908. Some sources maintain that she was born in 1904-1905. Birth records for San Antonio are not available for years earlier than 1910. There are two sources used for her birth date: 1) The 1905 date is based on the 1910 US Census, where she was listed as 5 years old. 2) The Social Security Death Index uses the birth date of March 23, 1908. The information was supplied when she applied for Social Security in California, but applicants were not required to show documentation for the date of birth until, and if, they applied for age-based Social Security retirement benefits later in life. Turner Classic Movies uses March 23, 1904 as her birth date, but the source for the information is unknown. Christina Crawford, her daughter stated on Larry King Live that she did not even know how old Crawford was at the time of her death.
  2. ^ a b c "Joan Crawford Dies at Home; Joan Crawford, Screen Star, Dies in Manhattan Home", New York Times, May 11, 1977, Wednesday. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. "Joan Crawford, who rose from waitress and chorus girl to become one of the great movie stars, died yesterday of a heart attack in her apartment at 158 East 68th Street. She gave her age as 69, but some reference works list her as two to four years older." 
  3. ^ IBDB Joan Crawford
  4. ^ Le Sueur. Rootsweb. Retrieved on 2007-08-26.
  5. ^ Blondes, Brunettes, and Bullets; Granlund, Nils T.; David McKay Company, New York, 1957, p 135.
  6. ^ Stardust and Shadows: Canadians in Early Hollywood,
  7. ^ Leese, Elizabeth: Costume Design in the Movies, Dover Books, 1991, ISBN 048626548X, p. 18
  8. ^ Considine, Bette and Joan: The Divine Feud Pg 224 ISBN-13: 978-0595120277
  9. ^ Bret, Joan Crawford: Hollywood Martyr Pg 176 ISBN-13: 978-0786718689
  10. ^ Crawford biography, IMDB

Nickname: Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ... Image:1910 census Freudenberg Lindauer. ... The Social Security Death Index is provided by the United States Department of Social Security. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... This article is about the U.S state. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... Christina Crawford (born June 11, 1939) is an American actress and writer, best known as the author of Mommie Dearest, an exposé of the systematic child abuse allegedly committed by her mother, actress Joan Crawford. ... Larry King Live is an American talk show hosted by Larry King on CNN. The show debuted in 1985, and is CNNs most watched program, with over one million viewers nightly. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Myfamily. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) [1] is an online database of information about actors, movies, television shows, television stars and video games. ...

External links

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Joan Crawford
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Awards
Preceded by
Ingrid Bergman
for Gaslight
Academy Award for Best Actress
1945
for Mildred Pierce
Succeeded by
Olivia de Havilland
for To Each His Own
Preceded by
None
NBR Award for Best Actress
1945
for Mildred Pierce
Succeeded by
Anna Magnani
for Rome, Open City
Preceded by
Gregory Peck
Cecil B. DeMille Award
1970
Succeeded by
Frank Sinatra
Persondata
NAME Crawford, Joan
ALTERNATIVE NAMES LeSueur, Lucille Fay
SHORT DESCRIPTION Academy Award-winning American actress
DATE OF BIRTH March 23, 1905
PLACE OF BIRTH San Antonio, Texas, USA
DATE OF DEATH May 10, 1977
PLACE OF DEATH New York City, New York, USA

Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... San Antonio redirects here. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... New York, New York redirects here. ...


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Writings: A Look at Joan Crawford's Role in Hollywood (884 words)
Crawford was born in San Antonio, Texas in 1904 as Lucille Le Sueur, although her friends and family called her "Billie." She was not named Joan Crawford until much later, when her Hollywood agency ran a contest through a fan magazine to find a suitable name for the emerging star.
Joan Crawford had many working-class women fans, for she was considered the rags-to-riches symbol of professional success.
Crawford was a self-made star, and her roles were often heroines in the working class, striving for a better life.
Joan Crawford: Biography and Much More from Answers.com (4630 words)
Joan Crawford was a bubbly ingenue of silent films during the "flapper era" of the late 1920s.
Crawford shot to stardom on the strength of 1928's Our Dancing Daughters, starring in a jazz-baby role originally slated for Clara Bow; the film was hugely successful, and MGM soon doubled her salary and began featuring her name on marquees.
Crawford's role as Diana Medford in Our Dancing Daughters (1928) catapulted her to stardom and established her as a symbol of modern 1920s-style femininity that rivalled the image of Clara Bow, who was then Hollywood's foremost flapper.
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