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Encyclopedia > Joachim Neander

Joachim Neander (Neumann) (1650 - May 31, 1680) was a Calvinist teacher who became famous for creating the words to the church choral Praise to the Lord, the Almighty (German: Lobet den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren) in 1679. // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ... May 31 is the 151st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (152nd in leap years), with 214 days remaining, as the last day of May. ... Events First Portuguese governor was appointed to Macau The Swedish city Karlskrona was founded as the Royal Swedish Navy relocated there. ... In an unadorned church, the 17th century congregation stands to hear the sermon. ... Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ...


Joachim Neander was born in Bremen, the son of a Latin teacher. His grandfather, a musician, had according to fashion of that time changed the family name from the original "Neumann" ("New man" in English) to the Greek Neander. After the death of his father he could not afford to study at a famous university, thus 1666 - 1670 he studied theology in his hometown, however not with his full heart. Only when he heard a sermon of Theodor Undereyk shortly before the end of his study his beliefs became serious. Bremen lies in North Germany 50km South of the North Sea. ... Events September 2 - Great Fire of London: A large fire breaks out in London in the house of Charles IIs baker on Pudding Lane near London Bridge. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Theology is reasoned discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, word or reason). It also refers to the study of other religious topics. ...


In 1671 he became house teacher in Heidelberg, and in 1674 he became teacher in a Latin school in Düsseldorf, one step before becoming a priest. When living there he liked to go the nearby valley of the Düssel, the nature being his inspiration for his poems. He also held gatherings and services in the valley, on which he gave sermons. The valley was renamed after him in his honor in the early 19th century, and became famous in 1856 when the remains of the Homo neanderthalensis were found there. Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... Map of Germany showing Heidelberg Heidelberg (halfway between Stuttgart and Frankfurt) is a city in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. ... Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. ... Düsseldorf is the capital city of the German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1856 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Binomial name Homo neanderthalensis King, 1864 The Neanderthal or Neandertal was a species of genus Homo (Homo neanderthalensis) that inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia from about 230,000 to 29,000 years ago (in the Middle Palaeolithic, early Stone Age). ...


In 1679 Neander became a priest in Bremen, as his popularity with the common people gave him problems with the church administration in Düsseldorf. One year later he died, probably of the plague. Events January 24 - King Charles II of England disbands Parliament August 7 - The brigantine Le Griffon, which was commissioned by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, is towed to the southern end of the Niagara River, to become the first ship to sail the upper Great Lakes. ... Plague is usually understood as a generic term for Bubonic plague, the mortal disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis, which is spread by fleas from rats to human beings. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Joachim Neander (251 words)
Joachim Neander (1650 - May 31, 1680) was a Calvinist teacher who became famous for creating the words to the church choral Praise to the Lord, the Almighty (German: Lobet den Herren, den mächtigen König der Ehren) in 1679.
The valley was renamed after him in his honor in the early 19th century, and got famous in 1856 when the remains of the Neanderthal humans were found there.
In 1679 Neander became a priest in Bremen, as his popularity at the common people gave him problems with the church administration in Düsseldorf.
Joachim Neander - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (292 words)
He is considered by many to be the first important German hymnist after the Reformation and is regarded as the outstanding hymn writer of the German Reformed Church.
Joachim Neander was born in Bremen, the son of a Latin teacher.
In 1679 Neander became a pastor in Bremen, as his popularity with the common people gave him problems with the church administration in Düsseldorf.
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