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Encyclopedia > Jinja (Shinto)
A torii is a gate leading to a jinja. This one stands in the sea before the Itsukushima Shrine.
A torii is a gate leading to a jinja. This one stands in the sea before the Itsukushima Shrine.
Charms for safe pregnancy, safe driving, and other well-wishes being sold at Itsukushima Shrine
Charms for safe pregnancy, safe driving, and other well-wishes being sold at Itsukushima Shrine

A jinja (Japanese: 神社) is a Shinto shrine and its surrounding natural area. In common usage, jinja often refers to the buildings of a shrine. Unlike a church or a mosque, a jinja traditionally has neither characteristics of a chapel nor a place for propagation; its sole purpose is for the enshrinement and worship of a kami. In recent centuries, especially significant kami have come to be enshrined throughout Japan. Some kami and jinja that have widespread geographic distribution include Download high resolution version (796x675, 564 KB) A Japanese torii at Itsukushima Shrine Taken in August 2004 by Dan Smith. ... Download high resolution version (796x675, 564 KB) A Japanese torii at Itsukushima Shrine Taken in August 2004 by Dan Smith. ... A famous floating torii at Itsukushima Shrine Multiple torii at Osaka shrine Torii are widespread in Japan, to the extent that modern architecture sometimes emulates their form. ... The torii of Itsukushima Shrine, the sites most recognizable landmark, appears to float in the water. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 903 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 903 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... A church building (or simply church) is a building used in Christian worship. ... The Badshahi Masjid in Lahore, Pakistan with an iwan at center, three domes, and five visible minarets A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Worship usually refers to specific acts of religious praise, honour, or devotion, typically directed to a supernatural being such as a god or goddess. ... Megami redirects here. ...

Contents

Asama Shrine(浅間神社 Asama Jinja,Sengen Jinja) is a type of Shinto Shrine in Japan. ... The initialism ASO may refer to: the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra the American Symphony Orchestra the Amaury Sport Organisation This page expands a three-character combination which might be any or all of: an abbreviation, an acronym, an initialism, a word in English, or a word in... Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Monk, statue from Kamakura period, 1201 AD Hachiman (Japanese, 八幡神 -shin, also can be read as Yawata no kami) is the Shinto god of war, and divine protector of Japan and the Japanese people. ... Hachiman Shrine ) (or 八幡宮 Hachiman-guu) is a shinto shrine dedicated to the god Hachiman. ... Hikawa shrine Hikawa shrine (Japanese: ) in the Omiya district of Saitama is a major Shinto jinja. ... Inari (Japanese: 稲荷) is the Shinto god of fertility, rice, and foxes. ... Inari Shrine ) is a shinto shrine to worship Inari. ... Kumano (熊野市; -shi) is a city located in Mie, Japan. ... Kumano Shrine (Japanese:熊野神社) is a shinto shrine. ... Munakata Shrine (宗像大社) is a shrine in the city of Munakata, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. ... Suwa Shrine ) is a shinto shrine. ... Tenjin (天神) is the Shinto kami of scholarship, the deified Sugawara no Michizane. ... Tenman-gÅ« ) is a shinto shrine to worship Sugawara no Michizane as Tenjin. ... Yomeimon at Nikko Toshogu Toshogu (東照宮) is any Shinto shrine in which Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the last shogunate of Japan, is enshrined with the name Tosho Dai Gongen. ...

Origin

According to tradition, this is the cave at Amanoiwato where Amaterasu hid, causing darkness over the earth.
According to tradition, this is the cave at Amanoiwato where Amaterasu hid, causing darkness over the earth.

It is believed that a jinja had originally been only a temporary shrine constructed for a periodical matsuri at a sacred place such as a mountain or cave. This was because it had been believed that kami would move around as much as any animal, and could not be confined. Okinawa's Utaki retains some of these beliefs. Ama-no-Iwato cave Ama-no-Uzume Amaterasu Shinto Japanese mythology Takachiho, Miyazaki Kyushu Japan I took this photo in 1995 and contribute it to the public domain. ... Ama-no-Iwato cave Ama-no-Uzume Amaterasu Shinto Japanese mythology Takachiho, Miyazaki Kyushu Japan I took this photo in 1995 and contribute it to the public domain. ... The Sun goddess emerging out of a cave, bringing sunlight back to the universe. ... Stalls selling food or toys are a familiar sight at festivals throughout Japan. ... Mount McKinley (Denali) in Alaska (USA) has the highest visible base-to-summit elevation on Earth (approximately 5400 metres). ... Inside Cave of the Mounds. ... Phyla Subregnum Parazoa Porifera (sponges) Subregnum Agnotozoa Placozoa (trichoplax) Orthonectida (orthonectids) Rhombozoa (dicyemids) Subregnum Eumetazoa Radiata (unranked) (radial symmetry) Ctenophora (comb jellies) Cnidaria (coral, jellyfish, anemones) Bilateria (unranked) (bilateral symmetry) Acoelomorpha (basal) Myxozoa (slime animals) Superphylum Deuterostomia (blastopore becomes anus) Chordata (vertebrates, etc. ... This article is about the prefecture. ...


However, after a permanent shrine called a shaden (社殿) was built, it was reasoned that a kami would take residence inside a jinja. Some believe that the practice of constructing shaden is from Buddhism; even today, many jinja from ancient times do not have shaden, but only a place to pray while looking out to a sacred place or a specific area which must not be entered. A replica of an ancient statue of Gautama Buddha, found in Sarnath, near Varanasi. ... Prayer is an effort to communicate with a God, or to some deity or deities, either to offer praise to the deity, to make a request of the deity, or simply to express ones thoughts and emotions to the deity. ...


Facilities

Basin for washing hands at Meiji Shrine in Tokyo
Basin for washing hands at Meiji Shrine in Tokyo

A jinja has several facilities within its boundaries, including a honden (本殿) and haiden (拝殿). The honden is the building that contains the goshintai (御神体); literally, "the sacred body of the kami". Of these, only the haiden is open to the laity. The honden is located behind the haiden and is much smaller and undecorated. Other notable jinja facilities are torii that serve as sacred gates for entering a jinja, chōzuya (手水舎) where one may cleanse one's hands and mouth, and shamusho (社務所) that maintain a jinja. Download high resolution version (800x689, 250 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (800x689, 250 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The central sanctuary where the Meiji emperor is enshrined. ... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the capital and one of the forty-seven prefectures of Japan. ... In Shinto shrines, the honden (本殿, main building) is the most sacred area, intended purely for the use of the kami. ... In religious organizations, the laity comprises all lay persons collectively. ... A famous floating torii at Itsukushima Shrine Multiple torii at Osaka shrine Torii are widespread in Japan, to the extent that modern architecture sometimes emulates their form. ...

During the Nara period and into the early Meiji period, it was not uncommon for a Buddhist temple to be built inside or next to a jinja. When a jinja houses a Buddhist temple, it is called a jinguji (神宮寺). After separation of the Buddhist temples and jinja was ordered in the Meiji period, the connection between two was officially severed, but many continued to cooperate on matsuri and other occasions into the present. Isonokami Jingu Shinto Shrine Tenri, Nara Japan I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... Isonokami Jingu Shinto Shrine Tenri, Nara Japan I took this photograph and contribute it to the public domain. ... Building at Isonokami Jingu The Isonokami Jingu (石上神宮) is a Shinto shrine located in the city of Tenri, Nara Prefecture, Japan. ... For god from Turkic mythology see: Täñre. ... The Nara period ) of the history of Japan covers the years from about AD 710 to 794. ... The Meiji period ) denotes the 45-year reign of Emperor Meiji, running from 8 September 1868 (in the Gregorian calendar, 23 October 1868) to 30 July 1912. ...


The buildings and grounds of a jinja often include many of the following:

  • kaguraden (神楽殿)
  • kenzoku (眷属).
  • koma-inu (狛犬; lion-dog statues)
  • maiden (舞殿)
  • romon (楼門)
  • sessha (摂社)
  • suesha (末社)
  • tamagaki (玉垣)
  • toro (燈籠; lanterns)

Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog is a mammal in the order Carnivora. ... Stone lantern in a Chinese Garden A chōchin invites customers into an okonomiyaki restaurant in Japan A lantern is a portable lighting device used to illuminate broad areas. ...

Kannushi

Stone lantern at a neighborhood Aso shrine
Stone lantern at a neighborhood Aso shrine

A Kannushi (神主) is responsible for maintenance of a jinja as well as leading worship. He generally does not propagate. Traditionally, most jinja did not have a Kannushi and was maintained by a committee of local populace who are called Ujiko (氏子). In a jinguji, a Buddhist monk maintained the jinja in addition to his temple. Download high resolution version (487x850, 259 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (487x850, 259 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Kannushi
Kannushi

Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

Kami

A kami worshipped at a jinja is generally a Shinto kami but sometimes Buddhist or Taoist deities are worshiped, as well as other kami not generally considered to belong to Shinto. Some shrines are established to worship living people or figures from myths and legends. // The word mythology (Greek: μυθολογία, from μυθος mythos, a story or legend, and λογος logos, an account or speech) literally means the (oral) retelling of myths – stories that a particular culture believes to be true and that use supernatural events or characters to explain the nature of the universe and humanity. ... A legend (Latin, legenda, things to be read) is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. ...


Customs

This komainu guards the Asakusa Jinja in Tokyo.
This komainu guards the Asakusa Jinja in Tokyo.

A jinja is a place for peace and, except for occasional matsuri, one should not run around or engage in activities that make great noise. Most jinja, however, welcome children playing, with some discretions. A common faux pas by a foreigner, especially during a hot summer day, is drinking from the cool water of a chozusha. A more severe offense is entering the sacred area without permission or entering a shaden uninvited. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Asakusa Jinja is a Shintō shrine located adjacent to the temple Sens&#333ji in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. ... Tokyo , literally Eastern capital)   is the capital and one of the forty-seven prefectures of Japan. ... A faux pas, (IPA , plural: faux pas ) (French for false step) is a violation of accepted, although unwritten, social rules. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:Shinto shrines

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jinja shinto (589 words)
Jinja shinto is the form of Shinto commonly practised at the nearly 100,000 recognised shrines throughout Japan.
Shinto doctrines are hard to identify; one of the strengths of Shinto is said to be its inherent vagueness.
The universally symbol of shrine Shinto is the torii or archway marking the approach to a shrine.
Shinto - Crystalinks (4240 words)
Shinto consists of the traditional Japanese religious practices as well as the beliefs and life attitudes that are in accord with these practices.
Shinto is more readily observed in the social life of the Japanese people and in their personal motivations than in a pattern of formal belief or philosophy.
In Shinto all the deities are said to cooperate with one another, and life lived in accordance with a kami's will is believed to produce a mystical power that gains the protection, cooperation, and approval of all the particular kami.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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