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Encyclopedia > Jim Jeffords
Jim Jeffords
Jim Jeffords

In office
January 3, 1989 – January 4, 2007
Preceded by Robert Stafford
Succeeded by Bernie Sanders

Born May 11, 1934 (1934-05-11) (age 73)
Rutland, Vermont
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Independent
Spouse Elizabeth Daley (d. 2007)
Religion Congregationalist

James Merrill "Jim" Jeffords (born May 11, 1934) is a former U.S. Senator from Vermont. He served as a Republican until 2001, when he left the party to become an independent. Jim Jeffords might refer to: Jim Jeffords, U.S. politician. ... From http://jeffords. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Robert Theodore Stafford (born August 8, 1913) is a retired American politician from Vermont. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current big willy floppah junior United States Senator from big blob of brown poo Vermont. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Rutland City, Vermont Rutland is a city located in Rutland County, Vermont. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ...

Contents

Background

Jeffords was born in Rutland, Vermont, the son of Marion Hausman and Olin Jeffords,[1] who was formerly Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court. Jeffords holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University (1956) and a law degree from Harvard Law School (1962). After three years of active duty in the United States Navy (1956–1959), Jeffords served in the Naval Reserves until he retired as a Captain in 1990. Jeffords married his late wife, Elizabeth "Liz" Daley twice. Their first marriage was in 1961. In 1979 the couple divorced. On Aug. 26, 1986, they married again, exactly 25 years after their first marriage. Liz Jeffords died on the morning of April 13, 2007 after a long struggle with ovarian cancer. Senator Jeffords and his wife had two children, Leonard and Laura. Jeffords' residence is in Shrewsbury, Vermont. Rutland City, Vermont Rutland is a city located in Rutland County, Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... The Vermont Supreme Court is the highest judicial authority of the U.S. state of Vermont and is one of seven state courts of Vermont. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... USN redirects here. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Shrewsbury, Vermont Shrewsbury is a town located in Rutland County, Vermont. ...


Political career

Jeffords (right) with fellow senator Christopher Dodd at the Pentagon speaking on defense issues, May 2000.
Jeffords (right) with fellow senator Christopher Dodd at the Pentagon speaking on defense issues, May 2000.

Jeffords entered politics in 1966, winning a seat in the Vermont State Senate. He followed that success in 1968 with a victory in the race for Vermont Attorney General. In 1974, he won Vermont's sole seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he served for fourteen years and was the ranking Republican member of the House Education and Labor Committee. In 1988, Jeffords was elected to the U.S. Senate, and was reelected in 1994 and 2000. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1434x1058, 192 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jim Jeffords Christopher Dodd ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1434x1058, 192 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Jim Jeffords Christopher Dodd ... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician from Willimantic, Connecticut. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... The Vermont Senate is the upper house of the Vermont General Assembly, which is the states legislature. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... The U.S. state of Vermont is represented in the U.S. House of Representatives by a single at-large congressional district. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... The Committee on Education and Labor is a committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1988 was an election for the United States Senate in which, in spite of the Republican victory by George Herbert Walker Bush in the presidential election... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Republican holds in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue. ... Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ...


Jeffords' work in Congress focused on legislation involving education, job training, and individuals with disabilities. In his later years in the Senate, his emphasis shifted somewhat, as Jeffords pushed several important pieces of environmental legislation through Congress. He was, together with Paul Simon, credited by Canadian Lieutenant-General Roméo Dallaire, Force Commander of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda (UNAMIR) from 1993 to 1994, for actively lobbying the US administration into mounting a humanitarian mission to Rwanda during the Rwandan Genocide. According to Dallaires' book Shake Hands with the Devil, he "owe(s) a great debt of gratitude" to both senators. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... Look up disability in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Paul Martin Simon (November 29, 1928 – December 9, 2003) was an American politician from Illinois. ... Lieutenant-General Roméo Alain Dallaire, OC, CMM, GOQ, MSC, CD, B.Sc, LL.D (h. ... The United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda was a relief mission instituted by the United Nations to aid the implementation of the Arusha Accords, signed August 4, 1993 in order to ease tensions between the Hutu-dominated Rwandese government and the Tutsi rebels (for the most part centered in the... The Rwandan Genocide was the 1994 mass killing of hundreds of thousands of ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutu sympathizers in Rwanda and was the largest atrocity during the Rwandan Civil War. ...


Jeffords was one of the founders of the Congressional Solar Coalition and the Congressional Arts Caucus. Jeffords was frequently recognized for his performance as a legislator, receiving Parenting Magazine's "Legislator of the Year" award in 1999, and the Sierra Club's highest commendation in 2002. Parenting is a magazine published in the United States. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ...


From Republican to Independent

On May 24, 2001, Jim Jeffords left the Republican Party, with which he had always been affiliated, and announced his new status as an independent. Jeffords discussed this vote during his announcement that he was leaving the Republican party. "I will make this change and will caucus with the Democrats for organizational purposes once the conference report on the tax bill is sent to the president. I gave my word to the president that I would not intercept or try to intervene in the signing of that bill". Jeffords's independent status changed the Senate composition from 50-50 (with a Republican Vice President, Dick Cheney, serving as President of the Senate to break tie votes) to 49 Republicans, 50 Democrats, and one independent. Jeffords promised to vote for Democratic control after being promised a committee chairmanship by Democratic Leader Tom Daschle. He then handed his chairmanship of the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, which he had held since 1997, to Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and was given the chairmanship of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, which would have been occupied by ranking minority member Harry Reid. Jeffords held this committee chair until the Democrats lost control of the Senate in 2003 following Congressional elections in 2002. is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... In politics, party switching is any change in party affiliation of a partisan public figure, usually one who is currently holding elected office. ... A vice president is an officer in government or business who is next in rank below a president. ... Richard Bruce Dick Cheney (born January 30, 1941), is the 46th and current Vice President of the United States, serving under President George W. Bush. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947) is a former U.S. Senator and Senate Majority Leader from South Dakota. ... The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ...


Jeffords made a deal with the Democrats according to which he would vote with them on all procedural matters except with permission of the whip, which would be rarely asked and rarely granted, in exchange for the committee seats that would have been available to Jeffords had he been a Democrat during his entire Senate tenure. He was free to vote as he pleased on policy matters, but more often than not voted with the Democrats. In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


Even before his party switch, his voting record was moderate-to-liberal, which has long been typical of Republicans from New England. In 1981, Jeffords was the only Republican member of the House to vote against a bill reducing the top tax rate from 70% to 50% — a hallmark of President Ronald Reagan's legacy. While a Republican Senator, he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1991, the Brady Bill, the Family and Medical Leave Act, an end to the ban on gays serving in the military, and against permanent normal trade relations with China. Jeffords was also vocal in his opposition to the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the United States Supreme Court by President George H.W. Bush. He was one of only two Republicans to vote against confirming Thomas. In 1993, he was the only prominent Republican to support President Clinton's unsuccessful attempt to establish a national healthcare plan. His position put him to the political left of many Democrats who had serious doubts about Clinton's plan. Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... “Reagan” redirects here. ... The Civil Rights Act of 1991 is a United States statute that was passed in response to a series of United States Supreme Court decisions limiting the rights of employees who had sued their employers for discrimination. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ... The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-3, enacted February 5, 1993) was one of the first major new laws enacted by United States President Bill Clinton in his first term, fulfilling a campaign promise. ... LGBT rights Around the world · By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Persecution Violence This box:      Dont ask, dont tell is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... The Clinton health care plan was a 1993 healthcare reform package proposed by the administration of Bill Clinton, then sitting President of the United States. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ...


Jeffords consistently voted against the ban on partial-birth abortion, and also against a harsher line on Cuba. In 1995 he was one of only 16 Senators to vote against the Communications Decency Act. The Supreme Court later struck it down as unconstitutional. Partial-birth abortion (PBA) is a non-medical term used to refer to some late-term abortion procedures. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was arguably the first attempt by the United States Congress to regulate pornographic material on the Internet, in response to public concerns in 1996. ...


At the time of his party switch, the American Conservative Union had given him the lowest lifetime rating of any Republican senator. The American Conservative Union (ACU) is a large conservative political lobbying group in the United States. ...


On October 11, 2002, Jeffords was one of 23 senators to vote against authorizing the use of military force in Iraq. is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... NOONE CARES Headline text The Joint Resolution to Authorize the Use of United States Armed Forces Against Iraq (H.J.Res. ...


Retirement

In April 2005, Jeffords announced his decision not to run for re-election in 2006. Jeffords said his wife's cancer and his own growing health concerns caused him to decide it was time to retire. On Sept. 27, 2006, Jeffords delivered his farewell speech on the Senate floor after 32 years of service. Only one Republican senator, Charles Grassley of Iowa, spoke to the floor in praise of Jeffords, whom he called "his friend." Floor speeches for retiring senators are a Senate tradition. The 70-year-old incumbent decided to retire despite consensus within the political community that he had good opportunity to win re-election in 2006. Jeffords' move set off a domino reaction among state politicians. Congressman Bernie Sanders, formerly the only independent in the U.S. House, ran for and won the seat being vacated by Jeffords, while Republican Governor Jim Douglas declared that he would not run. He may run for Governor of Vermont in the election of 2010. April 2005 : ← - January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December - → Hamas and Islamic Jihad have declared, in principle, their intention to join the Palestine Liberation Organisation (PLO). ... Charles Ernest Chuck Grassley (born September 17, 1933) is the senior United States Senator from Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current big willy floppah junior United States Senator from big blob of brown poo Vermont. ... James H. Jim Douglas (born June 21, 1951) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... This is a list of Governors of Vermont: As an Independent Republic Thomas Chittenden (None) 1778-1789 Moses Robinson (None) 1789-1790 Thomas Chittenden (None) 1790-1791 As a State Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Vermont ...

Further information: Vermont U.S. Senate election, 2006

The Vermont Senate election of 2006 will be held on November 7, 2006. ...

Trivia

Chester Trent Lott, Sr. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who was the 79th United States Attorney General. ... For the football player of the same name see Larry Craig (football player). ... Barbershop harmony is a style of unaccompanied vocal music characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note in a predominantly homophonic texture. ... The Singing Senators were a group of U.S. Republican Senators who sang as a barbershop quartet. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Taekwondo (also, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-Do, or Tae Kwon-Do) is a martial art and combat sport originating in Korea. ...

Further reading

  • James M. Jeffords, My Declaration of Independence (Simon & Schuster, 2001). ISBN 0-7432-2842-1
  • James M. Jeffords, An Independent Man (Simon & Schuster, 2003). ISBN 0-7432-2843-X
Political offices
Preceded by
James L. Oakes
Vermont Attorney General
1969–1973
Succeeded by
Kimberly B. Cheney
Preceded by
Richard W. Mallary
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's At-large congressional district

1975–1989
Succeeded by
Peter P. Smith
Preceded by
Robert Stafford
United States Senator (Class 1) from Vermont
1989–2007
Served alongside: Patrick Leahy
Succeeded by
Bernie Sanders
Preceded by
Nancy Landon Kassebaum
Kansas
Chairman of Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Commmittee
1997–2001
Succeeded by
Edward Kennedy
Massachusetts
Preceded by
Robert C. Smith
New Hampshire
Chairman of Senate Environment and Public Works Commmittee
2001–2003
Succeeded by
James Inhofe
Oklahoma

James L. Oakes (February 21, 1924) is a senior circuit judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Richard Walker Mallary (born February 21, 1929) is a U.S. Representative from Vermont. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Vermont to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The U.S. state of Vermont is represented in the U.S. House of Representatives by a single at-large congressional district since the 1930 census, when Vermont lost its second seat in the House of Representatives. ... Peter Plympton Smith, the son of prominent banker and state senator Frederick P. Smith, was born October 31, 1945. ... Robert Theodore Stafford (born August 8, 1913) is a retired American politician from Vermont. ... Vermont was admitted to the Union on March 4, 1791. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... Bernard Bernie Sanders (born September 8, 1941) is the current big willy floppah junior United States Senator from big blob of brown poo Vermont. ... Nancy Landon Kassebaum Baker (born July 29, 1932) represented the state of Kansas in the United States Senate from 1978 to 1997. ... The United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) has jurisdiction over matters relating to health, education, labor, and pensions. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Robert C. Bob Smith (born March 30, 1941) is an American politician who has served in both the United States House of Representatives and the Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is responsible for dealing with matters related to the environment and infrastructure. ... James Mountain Inhofe, usually known as Jim Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is an American politician from Oklahoma. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/jeffords.htm

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jim Jeffords - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (934 words)
Jim Jeffords holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University (1956) and a law degree from Harvard Law School (1962).
Jeffords was one of the founders of the Congressional Solar Coalition and the Congressional Arts Caucus.
Jeffords made a deal with the Democrats according to which he votes with them on all procedural matters except with permission of the Whip, which would be rarely asked and rarely granted, in exchange for the committee seats that would have been available to Jeffords had he been a Democrat during his entire Senate tenure.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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