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Encyclopedia > Jim Elliot
Jim Elliot

Born October 8, 1927(1927-10-08)
Flag of the United States Portland, Oregon
Died January 8, 1956 (aged 28)
Flag of Ecuador Curaray River, Ecuador
Nationality American
Education Benson Polytechnic H.S.
(1941-45)
Wheaton College
(1945-49)
Occupation Missionary
Spouse Elisabeth Elliot (née Howard)
(Oct 8, 1953Jan 8, 1956)
Children Valerie Elliot Shepard (1955)
Parents Fred Elliot
Clara Elliot
For others named Jim Elliot, see Jim Elliot (disambiguation)

Philip James Elliot (October 8, 1927January 8, 1956) was an evangelical Christian missionary to Ecuador who, along with four others, was killed while attempting to evangelize the Huaorani people through efforts known as Operation Auca. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ecuador. ... The Curaray is a river in Ecuador. ... Benson Polytechnic High School is a coeducational, public technical school in the Portland Public Schools District. ... Wheaton College is a private Evangelical Protestant, coeducational, liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois, a suburb 25 miles west of Chicago in the United States. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people in Ecuador. ... The French word née (feminine) or né (masculine) (or the English word nee) is still commonly used in some newspapers when mentioning the maiden name of a woman in engagement or wedding announcements. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Jim Elliot might refer to: Jim Elliot, a missionary. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      A Christian () is a person who... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... The Huaorani, also known as Waorani, Waodani, or Auca (Quechua for savage), are an indigenous tribe of the Ecuadorian Oriente (in the Amazon region). ... The reconstructed frame of Nate Saints plane, on display at the headquarters of the Mission Aviation Fellowship. ...

Contents

Early life

Jim Elliot was born in Portland, Oregon, to Fred and Clara Elliot. Fred was of Scottish heritage; his grandparents were the first of his family to settle in North America. Clara's parents moved near the turn of the 20th century from Switzerland to eastern Washington, where they operated a large and successful ranch. They met in Portland, where Clara was studying chiropractic and Fred, having devoted himself to Christian ministry, was working as a traveling preacher in a small Baptist church. After two years of correspondence, they were married in 1918. Robert, their first child, was born in 1921 while they were living in Seattle, and he was followed by Herbert, Jim, and Jane, all three of whom were born after the family moved to Portland.[1] Nickname: Location in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country United States State Oregon County Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter Area  - City 376. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... “Scot” redirects here. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Chiropractic (from Greek chiros and praktikos meaning done by hand) is a health care profession whose purpose is to diagnose and treat mechanical disorders of the spine and musculoskeletal system with the intention of affecting the nervous system and improving health. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ...


Jim's parents firmly subscribed to Christian beliefs, and they raised their children accordingly, taking them to church and reading the Bible regularly. Jim professed faith in Jesus at the age of six and grew up in a home where obedience and honesty were strictly enforced. The Elliot parents encouraged their children to be adventurous, however, and as a result they allowed them to be mischievous and encouraged them to appreciate outdoor activities.[2] This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


In 1941, Jim entered Benson Polytechnic High School, studying architectural drawing. There he participated in numerous activities, including the school newspaper, the football team, school plays, and the public-speaking club. His acting ability led some of the teachers in the school to suggest that he pursue acting as a career, and his oratorical skills were similarly lauded—after preparing and delivering a speech in honor of President Franklin D. Roosevelt hours after his death, a faculty member called it one of the best speeches he had ever heard.[3] Benson Polytechnic High School is a coeducational, public technical school in the Portland Public Schools District. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... FDR redirects here. ...


Jim used his speaking ability regularly, always ready at a moment's notice to discuss Christianity or defend his moral beliefs. He refused to compromise his convictions and was not afraid to launch into a mini-sermon explaining them. A classmate recounts how Jim quoted the Bible to the president of the student body as explanation for his refusal to attend a school dance. Another time, Jim risked expulsion from the public-speaking club by refusing to give a political speech, believing that Christians were not to involve themselves in politics. Strongly pacifist, he rejected the idea of using force to eliminate slavery in Africa, and he was prepared to stand as a conscientious objector had he been drafted to serve in World War II.[4] Pacifist may mean: an advocate of pacifism. ... Slave redirects here. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... It has been suggested that Conscientious objection throughout the world be merged into this article or section. ... “Conscript” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Wheaton

In the fall of 1945, Jim entered Wheaton College, a private Christian college in Illinois, believing that God had led him there. He saw his time there as an opportunity to grow spiritually, develop discipline, and prepare for future missions work. He selected his activities with these goals in mind. Believing in the value of physical conditioning, he joined the wrestling team during his first year, even though some considered it unnecessary and even ungodly. The following year, he refused a staff position within the college that would have given him a free year of tuition but also a significant time commitment and what he considered foolish responsibilities. He was not even fully convinced of the value of his studies, considering subjects like philosophy, politics, and culture to be distractions to one attempting to follow God. After a semester of relatively low grades, he wrote to his parents that he was unapologetic, deeming study of the Bible more important.[5] Wheaton College is a private Evangelical Protestant, coeducational, liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois, a suburb 25 miles west of Chicago in the United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Jim's burden for missions solidified during years at Wheaton. He soon followed the pattern of other "faith missions" by not seeking to be sponsored by a denomination.[6] A member of the campus organization Student Foreign Missions Fellowship, Jim spoke to an Intervarsity Christian Fellowship group on the role of the Holy Spirit in missions. During the summer of 1947, after his second year of college, he and his friend Ron Harris did missions work in Mexico. He stayed there for six weeks, working with and learning from a local missionary family.[7] At the end of the following year, he attended the International Student Missionary Convention, sponsored by InterVarsity. There he met a missionary to Brazil, and this encounter led him to more firmly believe that his missionary calling was to tribal work in South America.[8] Faith mission is a term used most frequently among Evangelical Christians to refer to a missionary agency with an approach to evangelism that requires its missionaries to trust in God to provide the necessary resources and who are not financially supported by denominations with a fixed salary. ... InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, commonly referred to as InterVarsity, IVCF or simply IV, is an interdenominational, evangelical Christian ministry for college students. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      In mainstream Christianity, the... Urbana is a major Christian missions convention sponsored by InterVarsity Christian Fellowship that is designed to give Christian college students a missionary perspective and a desire to impact their universities and the world for Christianity. ... South America South America is a continent crossed by the equator, with most of its area in the Southern Hemisphere. ...


At the beginning of Jim's third year at Wheaton, he decided to pursue a major in Greek, believing that it would both help him in his personal study of the Bible and make it easier to translate the Scriptures into the language of a people group unreached by missionaries. One of his classmates was Elisabeth Howard, and despite his belief that romantic relationships often distracted people from pursuing God's will, his interest in her grew. He took advantage of opportunities to get to know her and her family better, but he waited until late in his third year to express his feelings to her. They agreed that they were attracted to each other, but not being convinced of God's leading, they did not pursue a serious relationship.[9] Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people in Ecuador. ...


Preparation

Jim graduated from Wheaton in 1949 and returned to his family's home in Portland early in the summer. He felt no immediate leading toward missions work and instead devoted more time to reading and study of the Bible. He engaged himself in some odd jobs at his church and worked as a substitute teacher at a local Christian school, but his lack of consistent employment was met with the disapproval of some of his neighbors. He maintained correspondence with Wilfred Tidmarsh, a missionary to the Quechua of Ecuador, as well as Rowland Hill, a missionary in Bangalore, India, who wanted Jim to teach biblical Greek in a Bible school he intended to found. Jim was not sure of which path to take and decided instead to wait.[10] It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... , Bangalore (Bengalūru) (Kannada: ; pronunciation: in Kannada and in English) is the capital of the state of Karnataka in [[India]. Located on the Deccan Plateau in the south-eastern part of Karnataka, Bangalore has an estimated metropolitan population of 6. ...


In January 1950, Jim was accepted to attend Camp Wycliffe, a summer linguistics program sponsored by the Summer Institute of Linguistics and the University of Oklahoma. While not sure whether to attend, his focus on missions was steady—he got involved in InterVarsity, attending many group meetings and conferences during the spring. In April, he turned down an offer of full-time employment for the school in which he had been a substitute teacher, and soon after he decided to attend Camp Wycliffe.[11] SIL International is a non-profit, faith-based, scientific organization with the main purpose to study, develop and document lesser-known languages for the purpose of expanding linguistic knowledge, promoting world literacy and aiding minority language development. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ...


Influences

During his time in college and the years following, Jim read extensively, and his journals and letters were filled with thoughts on the works he was reading. Besides the Bible, which he memorized and referenced continually, he was impacted by the lives of Christian authors and missionaries such as Amy Carmichael, Hudson Taylor, Jonathan Goforth, and James Orr.[12] Other biographies he enjoyed included those of E. H. Broadbent, David Brainerd, J. G. Paton, and Allan Smith.[13] Among non-Christian authors, he mentions in his journal as particularly interesting works by Friedrich Nietzsche, Thomas Hardy, and Ernest Hemingway.[14] In poetry, he read, memorized, and sang hymns,[15] and enjoyed numerous poets—especially Robert W. Service, William Wordsworth, and Edgar Allan Poe,[16] but also J. G. Holland, Rudyard Kipling, Sara Teasdale, John Keble, and Percy Bysshe Shelley.[17] Amy Beatrice (a. ... Hudson & Maria Taylor in 1865 James Hudson Taylor 戴德生 (May 21, 1832 – June 3, 1905), was a British Protestant Christian missionary to China, and founder of the China Inland Mission (CIM) (now OMF International) who served there for 51 years, bringing over 800 missionaries to the country and directly resulting in... The Reverend Jonathan Goforth, DD, (Chinese: 顧約拿單 ), February 10, 1859-October 8, 1936) was a Canadian Presbyterian missionary to China. ... Professor James Orr (1844-1913) was a Scottish theologian and historian, born in Glasgow. ... David Brainerd Brainerd preaching to Native Americans Brainerds tomb in Northampton David Brainerd, (April 20, 1718 – October 19, 1747) was an American missionary to the Native Americans. ... Rev. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a 19th-century German philosopher. ... “Thomas Hardy” redirects here. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Robert W. Service Robert William Service (January 16, 1874 – September 11, 1958) was a poet and writer. ... William Wordsworth (April 7, 1770 – April 23, 1850) was a major English romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped launch the Romantic Age in English literature with their 1798 joint publication, Lyrical Ballads. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Josiah Gilbert Holland, (1819 - 1881), novelist and poet, born in Belchertown, Massachusetts, helped to found and edit Scribners Monthly (afterwards the Century Magazine), in which appeared his novels, Arthur Bonnicastle, The Story of Sevenoaks, Nicholas Minturn. ... This article is about the British author. ... Sara Teasdale (August 8, 1884 – January 29, 1933), was an American lyrical poet. ... John Keble John Keble (April 25, 1792- March 29, 1866) was an English churchman, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, and gave his name to Keble College, Oxford (1870). ... -1...


Leaving for Ecuador

While at Camp Wycliffe, Jim practiced the skills necessary for writing down a language for the first time by working with a former missionary to the Quechua people. The missionary told him of the Auca people, an indigenous people group in Ecuador that had never had friendly contact with the outside world. Jim remained unsure about whether to go to Ecuador or India until July, when he became convinced that God was leading him to Ecuador. His parents and friends wondered if he might instead be more effective in youth ministry in the United States, but considering the home church "well-fed", he felt that international missions should take precedence.[18] The Huaorani, also known as Waorani, Waodani, or Auca (Quechua for savage), are an indigenous tribe of the Ecuadorian Oriente (in the Amazon region). ...


After the completion of his linguistic studies, Jim applied for a passport and began to make plans with his friend Bill Cathers to leave for Ecuador. However, two months later Bill informed him that he planned to marry, making it impossible for him to accompany Jim as they had planned.[19] Instead, Jim spent the winter and spring of 1951 working with his friend Ed McCully in Chester, Illinois, running a radio program, preaching in prisons, holding evangelistic rallies, and teaching Sunday School.[20] T. Edward McCully, Jr. ... For the larger local government district, see Chester (district). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Ed McCully married later that summer, forcing Jim to look elsewhere for an unmarried man with whom he could begin working in Ecuador. That man turned out to be Peter Fleming, a graduate of the University of Washington with a degree in philosophy. He corresponded frequently with Jim, and by September he was convinced of his calling to Ecuador.[21] In the meantime, Jim visited friends on the east coast, including Elisabeth. In his journal he expressed hope that they would be able to be married, but at the same time felt that he was called to go to Ecuador without her. Jim returned to Portland in November and began to prepare to leave the country.[22] T. Edward McCully, Jr. ... This article is about Peter Fleming the writer. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ...


Ecuador

He arrived in Ecuador on February 21, 1952, with the purpose of evangelizing Ecuador's Quechua Indians. On October 8, 1953, he married fellow Wheaton alumna and missionary Elisabeth Howard in Quito, Ecuador. Their only child, Valerie, was born February 27, 1955. While working with the Quechua Indians, Elliot began preparing to reach the violent Huaorani Indian tribe which were known at the time as the Aucas. is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up evangelist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Quechuan languages. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people in Ecuador. ... Nickname: Luz de América Map of Ecuador showing location of Quito Coordinates: Country Ecuador Province Pichincha Canton Quito  - Mayor Paco Moncayo Area approx    - City 290 km²  - Land 290 km²  - Water 0 km² Elevation 2,800 m Population (2005, estimation)  - City 1,865,541 (canton)  - Density ~4,800/km² Time... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... The Huaorani, also known as Waorani, Waodani, or Auca (Quechua for savage), are an indigenous tribe of the Ecuadorian Oriente (in the Amazon region). ...


He and four other missionaries, Ed McCully, Roger Youderian, Peter Fleming, and their pilot, Nate Saint, made contact from their airplane with the Huaorani Indians using a loudspeaker and a basket to pass down gifts. After several months, the men decided to build a base a short distance from the Indian tribe, along the Curaray River. There they were approached one time by a small group of Huaorani Indians and even gave an airplane ride to one curious Huaorani whom they called "George" (his real name was Naenkiwi). Encouraged by these friendly encounters, they began plans to visit the Huaorani, but their plans were preempted by the arrival of a larger group of 10 Huaorani men, who killed Elliot and his four companions on January 8, 1956. Elliot's mutilated body was found downstream, along with those of the other men, except that of Ed McCully. T. Edward McCully, Jr. ... Roger Youderian (January 21, 1924 – January 8, 1956) was a Christian missionary to Ecuador, where he was killed by Huaorani Indians. ... Peter Fleming (1928-1956) was an American Christian missionary to Ecuador. ... For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... The reconstructed frame of Nate Saints plane, on display at the headquarters of the Mission Aviation Fellowship Nate Saint (August 30, 1923 – January 8, 1956) was a Christian missionary pilot to Ecuador, where he was killed by Huaorani, or Auca, Indians. ... The Curaray is a river in Ecuador. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Elliot's famous journal entry from Oct 28, 1956
Elliot's famous journal entry from Oct 28, 1956

His journal entry for October 28, 1949, contains his now famous quotation, expressing his belief that missions work was more important than his life. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ...

He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot lose.
Wheaton College commemorating Elliot and Ed McCully
Wheaton College commemorating Elliot and Ed McCully

Elliot and his friends became instantly known worldwide as martyrs[23], and Life Magazine published a ten-page article on their mission and death. They are credited with sparking an interest in Christian missions among the youth of their time and are still considered an encouragement to Christian missionaries working throughout the world. After her husband's death, Elisabeth Elliot and other missionaries began working among the Auca (Huaorani) Indians, where they had a profound impact and helped bring many people to Christ. She later published two books, Shadow of the Almighty: The Life and Testament of Jim Elliot and Through Gates of Splendor, which describe the life and death of her husband. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... T. Edward McCully, Jr. ... Look up Martyr in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A cover of Life Magazine from 1911 Life has been the name of two notable magazines published in the United States. ... Through Gates of Splendor is a 1957 best seller nonfiction book written by Elisabeth Elliot. ...


In 2003, a musical based on the story of Jim and Elisabeth Elliot, entitled Love Above All, was staged at the Victoria Concert Hall in Singapore by Mount Carmel Bible-Presbyterian Church. This musical was staged a second time in 2007 at the NUS University Cultural Centre. Exterior of Victoria Theatre The Victoria Theatre and Concert Hall (Chinese: 维多利亚剧院及音乐会堂) is a complex of two buildings and a clock tower joined together by a common corridor and located in the civic district of Singapore. ...


In 2005, a documentary based on the story was released entitled Beyond the Gates of Splendor. In 2006, a theatrical movie was released End of the Spear, based on the story of the pilot, Nate Saint, and the return trip of Saint's son attempting to reach the natives of Ecuador. Beyond the Gates of Splendor (also Beyond the Gates) is a 2002 feature-length documentary film. ... This article is about the film. ... The reconstructed frame of Nate Saints plane, on display at the headquarters of the Mission Aviation Fellowship Nate Saint (August 30, 1923 – January 8, 1956) was a Christian missionary pilot to Ecuador, where he was killed by Huaorani, or Auca, Indians. ...


References

  • Elliot, Elisabeth (1989). Shadow of the Almighty. San Francisco: HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-062213-X. 
  • Elliot, Elisabeth (2005). Through Gates of Splendor. Wheaton, Illinois: Tyndale. ISBN 0-8423-7151-6. 
  • Tucker, Ruth (1983). From Jerusalem to Irian Jaya A Biographical History of Christian Missions. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan. ISBN 0310239370. 
  • Rusten, E. Michael (2003). The One Year Book of Christian History. Tyndale House. ISBN 0842355073. 

Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people in Ecuador. ... Elisabeth Elliot is a missionary who spent some years among the Waorani people in Ecuador. ... Through Gates of Splendor is a 1957 best seller nonfiction book written by Elisabeth Elliot. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Elliot (1989), 23-25
  2. ^ Elliot (1989), 25-26
  3. ^ Elliot (1989), 28
  4. ^ Elliot (1989), 31-33
  5. ^ Elliot (1989), 37-43
  6. ^ Tucker (1983), 336
  7. ^ Elliot (1989), 43-46
  8. ^ Elliot (1989), 87-88
  9. ^ Elliot (1989), 47-51, 56-57, 88-89
  10. ^ Elliot (1989), 103, 109-114
  11. ^ Elliot (1989), 116, 126
  12. ^ Elliot (1989), 85, 94, 118 (Carmichael); 61, 108-109 (Taylor); 108 (Goforth); 109 (Orr)
  13. ^ Elliot (1989), 108-10, 112
  14. ^ Elliot (1989), 109, 155-56
  15. ^ Elliot (1989), 56, 68, 188
  16. ^ Elliot (1989), 82-83, 103, 120 (Service); 110 (Wordsworth); 31, 109 (Poe)
  17. ^ Elliot (1989), 100, 103, 107, 114
  18. ^ Elliot (1989), 128-32
  19. ^ Elliot (1989) 134-36
  20. ^ Elliot (1989), 140-145, 147
  21. ^ Elliot (2005), 20-23
  22. ^ Elliot (1989), 149, 151-152, 154
  23. ^ Rusten (2003), 326

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Jim Elliot

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ...

Sermons

Persondata
NAME Elliot, Philip James
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Elliot, Jim
SHORT DESCRIPTION Martyred Christian missionary to Ecuador
DATE OF BIRTH October 8, 1927
PLACE OF BIRTH Portland, Oregon
DATE OF DEATH January 8, 1956
PLACE OF DEATH Ecuador

  Results from FactBites:
 
Jim Elliot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (503 words)
Elliot was born in Portland, Oregon, to Fred and Clara Elliot, and became a Christian at age six.
Elliot's mutilated body was found downstream, along with those of the other men, except that of Ed McCully.
Elliot and his friends became instantly known worldwide as martyrs, and Life Magazine published a ten-page article on their mission and death.
Elisabeth Elliot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (270 words)
Her husband, Jim Elliot, was one of five men who made initial contact with the Waorani, then called Aucas, on January 6, 1956.
Elisabeth Elliot went to the Waorani with Rachel Saint, sister of Nate Saint, another of the five, and learned the language with the help of Dayuma, a Waorani who had spent some time among the Quechuas.
Elliot studied classical Greek at Wheaton College where she met Jim Elliot.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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