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Encyclopedia > Jim Cramer
James J. Cramer

Born February 10, 1955 (1955-02-10) (age 52)[1]
Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, U.S.
Occupation Television personality
Author

James J. "Jim" Cramer (born February 10, 1955[2] in Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania) is an American television personality, former hedge fund manager, and best-selling author. In 2007, NewsBios.com named him one of the 100 most influential business journalists in the United States. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The verb to scrabble also means to scratch, scramble or scrape about: see Wiktionary:scrabble. ... Jim Kramer accepts $25,000 check for winning the U.S. Scrabble Open in Phoenix, Arizona, August 9, 2006 Jim Kramer (1958-) won the 2006 United States Scrabble Open in Phoenix, Arizona. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mad_Money. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... , Wyndmoor is a census-designated place (CDP) in Springfield Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA. The population was 5,601 at the 2000 census. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... , Wyndmoor is a census-designated place (CDP) in Springfield Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA. The population was 5,601 at the 2000 census. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ...


Cramer is host of CNBC's Mad Money and co-founder of TheStreet.com. According to the January 27, 2007 episode of High Net Worth on CNBC, Cramer claimed to have a net worth of over $100 million. He currently resides in Summit, New Jersey. This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... TheStreet. ... Nickname: Location of Summit within Union County and state of New Jersey Coordinates: , Country USA State New Jersey County Union Settled 1710 Incorporation as Township March 23, 1869 Incorporation as City March 8, 1899 Government  - Type Faulkner Act Council-Manager  - Mayor Jordan Glatt  - City Administrator Christopher Cotter Area  - City 15. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Contents

Early years

[3] He grew up in the town of Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, outside Philadelphia. One of his first jobs was selling ice cream at Veterans Stadium during Philadelphia Phillies games. Cramer went to Springfield Township High School in Montgomery County. , Wyndmoor is a census-designated place (CDP) in Springfield Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA. The population was 5,601 at the 2000 census. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... For the stadium in New Britain, Connecticut, see Veterans Stadium. ... Major league affiliations National League (1883–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 14, 20, 32, 36, 42 Name Philadelphia Phillies (1884–present) Philadelphia Quakers (1883-1889) (Also referred to as Blue Jays 1943-1945 despite formal name remaining Phillies) Other nicknames The Phils, The Phightin Phils... Springfield Township High School is a comprehensive high school in Erdenheim, Pennsylvania, housing students in grades eight through twelve with a September 2005 enrollment of 875. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Cramer graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1977 where he was also president of the Harvard Crimson. At this point in his life, Cramer was a staunch leftist, naming his plan to revitalize the Crimson after Lenin's "What Is To Be Done?".[4] Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... The Harvard Crimson, of Harvard University, is the United States oldest continuously published daily college newspaper. ... Vladimir Ilyich Lenin ( Russian: Влади́мир Ильи́ч Ле́нин  listen?), original surname Ulyanov (Улья́нов) ( April 22 (April 10 ( O.S.)), 1870 – January 21, 1924), was a... What Is to Be Done? (Russian: ) was a political pamphlet, written by Vladimir Lenin at the end of 1901 and early 1902. ...


Career

Journalist

After college, following a two-month tenure as the key operator at Congressional Quarterly, he worked as a journalist at the Tallahassee Democrat in Tallahassee, Florida. Living almost next door to the Chi Omega sorority house and Florida State University, he was one of the first on the scene after serial killer Ted Bundy attacked four women, killing two of them in 1978.[citation needed] After Tallahassee, he worked at the Los Angeles Herald Examiner as a spot news reporter, covering "basically anyone who died violently in California."[5] While he was covering a shooting in San Diego for the Examiner, a burglar cleaned out both his bungalow in L.A., and his checking account. For the next nine months, he lived mostly out of his car, with a pistol and hatchet for protection.[6] Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... Location in Leon County and the state of Florida Coordinates: , Country State County Leon Government  - Mayor John Marks Area  - City 254. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[7] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... Theodore Robert Ted Bundy (November 24, 1946 – January 24, 1989) was an American serial killer. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Categories: Newspaper stubs | Los Angeles history | Defunct United States newspapers | Newspapers of California ... A row of bungalows in Virginia A bungalow (Gujarati: , Hindi: ) is a type of single-story house. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Lawyer

Following this experience, Cramer moved in with his sister in Greenwich Village[citation needed]. His sister was studying to be a lawyer and encouraged Cramer to become a prosecutor. Cramer was one of the earliest reporters at American Lawyer magazine, where he worked for founder Steven Brill[7]. Cramer later earned a Juris Doctor degree from Harvard Law School.[8]). After graduating in 1984, Cramer's plans to become a prosecutor were dashed when he was denied employment with the Office of the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, headed at the time by Rudy Giuliani, because his law school grades were deemed not good enough.[9] The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... The prosecutor is the chief legal representative of the prosecution in countries adopting the common law adversarial system or the civil law inquisitorial system. ... The American Lawyer is a monthly law journal. ... At least two well-known people have been named Steven Brill: Steven Brill is the founder of American Lawyer magazine, Court TV, Contentville, and Brills Content. ... “J.D.” redirects here. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... This article is about the year. ... United States Attorneys (also known as federal prosecutors) represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court and United States court of appeals. ... The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: New York, Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... Rudolph William Louis Giuliani III, (born May 28, 1944) is an American lawyer, prosecutor, businessman, and Republican politician from the state of New York. ...


Investor

Cramer obtained employment in 1984 as a stock broker in Goldman Sachs' Sales & Trading department. Cramer's success in this position led him to found his own hedge fund, Cramer & Co. (later Cramer, Berkowitz, & Co.) in 1987. The fund operated out of the offices of hedge fund pioneer Michael Steinhardt's Steinhardt, Fine, Berkowitz & Co., and early investors included Eliot Spitzer (a Harvard classmate), Steven Brill, and Martin Peretz.[1] A year later, Cramer married Karen Backfisch-Olufsen, who was a trader with Steinhardt's firm. More recently, Cramer has been a contributor to New York magazine since 2000.[10] He is also an occasional contributor to Dime magazine.[11] Cramer retired from his hedge fund in 2001. It was taken over by his former partner Jeff Berkowitz. This article is about the year. ... A Stock broker sells or buys stock on behalf of a customer. ... The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... Michael Steinhardt (b. ... Eliot Laurence Spitzer (born June 10, 1959 ) is an American lawyer, politician and the current Governor of New York. ... Steven Brill (born August 22, 1950 in Queens, New York) is best known as the founder of Clear Registered Traveler, the New York-based startup airport security fast-pass company. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... Headquarters New York magazine is a weekly magazine, founded in 1968, concerned with the life, culture, politics, and style of New York City. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid it being considered...


TheStreet.com

In 1996 Cramer co-founded TheStreet.com with The New Republic editor Martin Peretz, one of his hedge fund's original clients. Cramer later had a falling out with Peretz over business matters.[12] Cramer is currently a market commentator and adviser to the TheStreet.com, as well as its largest shareholder. Cramer also manages a charitable trust stock portfolio which is tied to TheStreet.com through a subscription service called the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... TheStreet. ... For other uses, see New Republic. ... Martin H. Peretz, also known as Marty Peretz, (born December 6, 1938), is an American publisher and former Harvard University lecturer. ... A charitable trust is a trust established for charitable purposes. ...


Mad Money

Main article: Mad Money

Cramer now has his own television show on CNBC, Mad Money with Jim Cramer, which features his rapid-fire opinions on stocks suggested by callers. Mad Money is also well known for over-the-top antics such as Cramer throwing chairs, throwing his latest book whenever a caller mentions it, humorous sound effects, and for the catch-phrase "Booyah". This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

Logo for the Mad Money television show.

Cramer frequently takes the show on the road to various U.S. colleges. The name of the show is a play on Cramer's mental condition. Mad Money continues to be one of CNBC's most highly rated shows.[13] Image File history File linksMetadata Mad_Money. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Mad_Money. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ...

Other television and radio shows

After being a frequent guest commentator on CNBC in the late 1990s, Cramer co-hosted CNBC shows America Now and Kudlow & Cramer with Lawrence Kudlow in the early 2000s. Kudlow and Cramer split when Kudlow called Cramer 'sweet potato bull honzo' on the air on October 17, 2002. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... America Now is a former politics and business TV program on CNBC with Lawrence Kudlow and James Cramer. ... Former CNBC TV program with Lawrence Kudlow and James Cramer, now Kudlow & Company with Lawrence Kudlow. ... Lawrence (Larry) Kudlow (born August 19, 1947), is an American conservative, supply-side economics enthusiast and television personality. ...


Cramer hosted a one-hour radio show, "Jim Cramer's Real Money," until December 2006. The show was similar to his Mad Money TV show. He also guest hosted in the slot caused by the cancellation of Imus in the Morning (MSNBC and WFAN/Westwood One) in May 2007. Imus in the Morning was a comedy, news, and political radio program the United States, hosted by radio personality Don Imus. ... For the news website, see msnbc. ... For other uses, see WFAN (disambiguation). ... Westwood One, Inc. ...


Cameos and Other Appearances

  • 60 Minutes interview

On November 13, 2005, Dan Rather did a sit-down interview with Cramer on 60 Minutes. Among the topics of discussion were Cramer's past at his fund (including footage of Cramer trading during the 90s at his New York offices), his violent temper while at the fund, and what finally led him to come to his senses and "calm down". Footage of Cramer at his family home with his daughters and wife was also included. On November 15, 2005, Jim mentioned on his program that he received hundreds and hundreds of e-mails after his 60 Minutes interview. This report was taped before Cramer's radio show, Smart Money with Jim Cramer moved to WOR and became syndicated under the CBS Radio banner. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Daniel Irvin Rather, Jr. ... This article is about the CBS news magazine. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Arrested Development

In 2005, Cramer appeared as himself in two episodes of the now-defunct FOX TV series Arrested Development. He appeared to first announce that he had upgraded Bluth Company stock to a "Don't Buy" from a "Triple Sell", and then to say that the stock was not a "Don't Buy" anymore, but a "Risky". This article is about the animal. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Bluth Company logo. ...


Cramer has also made appearances on NBC's Today, NBC Nightly News, Live with Regis and Kelly, ESPN Classic's Cheap Seats, NBC's Late Night With Conan O'Brien, Comedy Central's The Colbert Report, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and Jimmy Kimmel Live. Today, commonly referred to as The Today Show to avoid ambiguity, is an American morning news and talk show airing weekday mornings on the NBC television network. ... NBC Nightly News is the flagship evening news program for NBC News and broadcasts from the GE Building, Rockefeller Center in New York City. ... Live with Regis and Kelly is a syndicated American television talk show, hosted by Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa. ... ESPN Classic features reruns of famous sporting events, sports documentaries, and sports themed movies. ... Cheap Seats is a television program broadcast on ESPN Classic hosted by brothers Jason and Randy Sklar. ... This article is about the television network. ... Late Night with Conan OBrien is an Emmy Award-winning American late night talk show that is syndicated worldwide. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... May 26, 2006 opening monologue of The Tonight Show with Jay Leno The Tonight Show with Jay Leno is an Emmy Award-winning American late-night talk show hosted by comedian Jay Leno on NBC. It premiered on May 25, 1992, succeeding The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. ... Jimmy Kimmel Live is a late-night talk show in the United States created and hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, broadcast from the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, California. ...


Controversy

Fox News Channel Lawsuit

In 2000, Cramer settled a lawsuit with Fox News Channel in which Fox had claimed Cramer reneged on a deal to produce a show for them. Their conflict began when Fox complained that Cramer promoted TheStreet.com's stock on the air.[14] Fox News redirects here. ...


Trading With The Enemy

In 2002, Nicholas Maier, a former trader at Cramer's hedge fund, released the book, Trading With The Enemy, about his time at Cramer, Berkowitz & Co. In the book, Maier alleged that Cramer and the hedge fund engaged in illegal trading practices. Maier also stated that Cramer was the subject of an SEC investigation. Cramer denied the allegations and threatened to sue the publisher for libel. The publisher of the book quickly destroyed 4000 copies of the original release, and re-released it after editing out 4 pages that were possibly libelous.[15] SEC redirects here. ...


SEC Subpoena

In February 2006, an SEC investigation into allegations of collusion between short-sellers and a stock research firm led to the serving of subpoenas to TheStreet.com and Cramer, as well as journalists for Dow Jones and Marketwatch.com. Cramer disclosed the subpoena on his Mad Money television show, holding it up to the camera with the word "Bull" handwritten on it.[16] Both Cramer and TheStreet.com refused to comply with the SEC's demands for communications between journalists and their sources, and First Amendment advocates publicly criticized the SEC move. Soon after, the SEC later stated it would not enforce the subpoena, and the investigation of the stock research firm was dropped a year later. In April 2006, the SEC announced a new policy on subpoenaing journalists, saying it would avoid issuing subpoenas "that might impair the news gathering and reporting functions." Any subpoena issued to a journalist must now be approved by the SEC's enforcement director.[17] The first ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution make up the Bill of Rights. ...


The allegations had been raised publicly and in a lawsuit against Gradient by Overstock.com chief executive Patrick M. Byrne. In May 2007, it was revealed that the SEC had subpoenaed Byrne in May 2006, in connection with an investigation of the company.[18] The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Patrick M. Byrne is CEO of internet retailer Overstock. ...


Market Manipulation: TheStreet.com Interview

In March 2007, a December 2006 interview from TheStreet.com's "Wall Street Confidential" webcast stirred controversy after it appeared on YouTube.com. In the video, Cramer described activities used by hedge fund managers to manipulate stock prices; some illegal and some debatably legal.[19] He described how he could push stocks higher or lower with as little as $5 million in capital when he was running his hedge fund. Cramer said, "A lot of times when I was short, I would create a level of activity beforehand that would drive the futures." He also encouraged hedge funds to engage in this type of activity because it is "a very quick way to make money." Cramer claimed that everything he did was legal, but that illegal activity is common in the hedge fund industry. He also stated that some hedge fund managers spread false rumors to drive a stock down: " ...it's important to create a new truth, to develop a fiction."[20] Cramer said one strategy to keep a stock price down is to spread negative rumors to reporters he described as "the Pisanis of the world". "You have to use these guys," said Cramer. He also discussed getting "the bozo reporter from The Wall Street Journal" to publish a negative article.[21] Cramer said this practice, although illegal, is easy to do "because the SEC doesn't understand it."[22] [23] TheStreet. ... YouTube. ... A hedge fund is a private investment fund charging a performance fee and typically open to only a limited range of qualified investors. ... In finance, a futures contract is a standardized contract, traded on a futures exchange, to buy or sell a certain underlying instrument at a certain date in the future, at a specified price. ... A Short and Distort scam involves short selling a stock while smearing a company with rumors to drive the stocks price down. ... Robert Pisani is a news correspondent for the financial news network CNBC. He has been with the network since 1990. ...


Criticism

  • In January 2006, Joseph Nocera opined that the "people who are watching [Mad Money] and following [Cramer's] advice are fools." [2]
  • In February 2007, Henry Blodget -- himself indicted for civil securities fraud in 2002 and banned for life from the securities industry -- criticized Cramer for overstating his abilities as a market forecaster, noting that in 2006 Cramer's suggested portfolio lost money "despite nearly every major equity market on earth being up between about 15 percent and 30 percent." [24]
  • In March 2007, a review by CXO Advisory showed that Cramer's stock picks have done worse than the market averages.[25]
  • In March 2007, Joseph Parnes, a noted short seller featured in Barron's, refuted positions by Cramer on CNBC, and has shown to his audience in his publication, Shortex, that using positions contrary to Cramer's recommendations is actually more advantageous.
  • In April 2007, Credit Bubble Stocks criticized Cramer because of a speech he gave on February 29, 2000, at the height of the dot-com bubble, recommending a number of speculative stocks that ultimately fell in value substantially with some even becoming worthless. [26]
  • In August 2007, Cramer called for the Federal Reserve to support hedge funds that were losing money in the Subprime mortgage financial crisis, prompting Martin Wolf, the chief economics commentator for the Financial Times, to accuse Cramer of advocating an offensive and catastrophic "socialism for capitalists". [27] However, within weeks the Fed had lowered the short term interest discount rate by 0.5% as Cramer had requested on his Stop Trading segment.

Joseph Nocera, an American journalist, lives in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Henry Blodget (born 1966) is a former securities analyst who was senior Internet analyst for Merrill Lynch during the dot-com bubble. ... Joseph Parnes is President of Technomart Investment Advisors and editor of the market letter Shortex. ... Barrons can mean: Barrons Educational Series, a publisher of books, as well as college entrance exam preparation classes and materials, based in the US Barrons Magazine, a financial weekly published by US-based Dow Jones & Company See also: Barron This is a disambiguation page — a navigational... This article is about CNBC U.S., the business news channel in the U.S.. For other uses, see CNBC (disambiguation). ... The dot-com bubble was a speculative bubble covering roughly 1995–2001 during which stock markets in Western nations saw their value increase rapidly from growth in the new Internet sector and related fields. ... The subprime mortgage financial crisis refers to the sharp rise in foreclosures in the subprime mortgage market that began in the United States in 2006 and became a global financial crisis in July 2007 as rising interest rates increased newly-popular variable rate mortgage payments and property values suffered declines...

Bibliography

  • Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life: Get Rich, Stay Rich (Make Your Kids Even Richer) ISBN 978-1416558859
  • Jim Cramer's Mad Money: Watch TV, Get Rich ISBN 1-4165-3790-2
  • Jim Cramer's Real Money: Sane Investing in an Insane World ISBN 0-7432-2489-2
  • Confessions of a Street Addict ISBN 0-7432-2487-6
  • You Got Screwed! Why Wall Street Tanked and How You Can Prosper ISBN 0-7432-4690-X

References

  1. ^ http://www.seekingalpha.com/article/54345-jim-cramer-s-stop-trading-11-14-07-don-t-nix-nyx
  2. ^ http://www.seekingalpha.com/article/54345-jim-cramer-s-stop-trading-11-14-07-don-t-nix-nyx
  3. ^ Feinberg, Andrew. "Cover Boy Cramer", The Money Monster Web Log, The Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc., 2005-10-24. Retrieved on [[2007-06-14]]. 
  4. ^ Tim Russert Show, July 14, 2007.
  5. ^ Tim Russert Show, July 14, 2007.
  6. ^ Cramer, James J. (2002). Confessions of a Street Addict. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, pp. 4-6. ISBN 0-7432-2487-6. 
  7. ^ http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=950DE3D71E3AF937A15750C0A96F948260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=print
  8. ^ Tim Russert Show, July 14, 2007.
  9. ^ Tim Russert Show, July 14, 2007.
  10. ^ "Archives: James J. Cramer". nymag.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-13.
  11. ^ "Archives: James J. Cramer". time.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-17.
  12. ^ The Fortune Tellers, p.146, Howard Kurtz, 2000, The Free Press books
  13. ^ Cramer, James J.. Cramer vs. Cramer. New York Magazine. New York Magazine Holdings LLC. Retrieved on 2007-08-03.
  14. ^ Associated Press/USA Today (December 4, 2000). Jim Cramer Quits Hedge Fund.
  15. ^ Joyce, Erin. "TheStreet.com's Cramer vs. Maier, Round II", internetnews.com, Jupitermedia Corporation, 2002-05-13. Retrieved on 2007-02-18. 
  16. ^ Matthew Goldstein, TheStreet.com (February 27, 2006). TheStreet.com, Cramer Get Subpoenas in Gradient Probe.
  17. ^ Marcy Gordon, Associated Press (February 14, 2007). SEC Ends Probe of Gradient.
  18. ^ New York Post (May 11,2007). Company Byrne-d on Probe Report.
  19. ^ Henry Bloget, Slate (March 22, 2007). Cramer vs. Cramer: Will his crazy confession destroy his career?.
  20. ^ Thomas Kostigen, MarketWatch.com (March 23, 2007). Jim Cramer's big mouth: His revelations only confirm what dupes average investors are.
  21. ^ Roddy Boyd, The New York Post (March 21, 2007). Cramer's Big Mouth: Clip Could Run Afoul of CNBC.
  22. ^ Matt Krantz, USA Today (March 24,2007). CNBC's Cramer boasts of manipulating markets.
  23. ^ Hamilton, Dane (2007-03-20). Jim Cramer draws fire over manipulation comments. Retrieved on 2007-03-20.
  24. ^ Blodget, Henry (2007-01-29). Pay No Attention to That Crazy Man on TV. Slate. The Washington Post Company. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  25. ^ LeCompte, Steve (2007-03-17). Jim Cramer Deconstructed. Retrieved on 2007-03-17.
  26. ^ James J Cramer, Mad Money Indeed. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  27. ^ Wolf, Martin (2007-08-17). Fear makes a welcome return. Retrieved on 2007-8-17.

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
James Cramer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1494 words)
Cramer graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1977 where he was an editor and the President of the Harvard Crimson.
In 1988, Cramer married his wife, Karen Backfisch, whom he refers to as the "Trading Goddess." (Karen was a professional trader herself, and Jim claims that she earned the nickname before the two met.) Karen stopped trading full-time after the birth of their first child in July 1991.
Maier was sued by Cramer due to a suggestion that Cramer was the subject of an SEC investigation of IPO practices.
Cramer vs. Cramer [Fool.com: Commentary] January 9, 2006 (1409 words)
Cramer is a brilliant man. His ability to have something to say on just about every name that is fired his way is commendable.
According to the recap, "Cramer said it would be silly for investors who have big gains to not ring the register after such a big move in the stock." The next day the stock opened at $69.21.
Yes, you have to give Cramer props in that the company didn't do much while he was away, though buying in a few pennies higher than after his July warning also came with the extra costs of two broker trades to step out and step back in.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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