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Encyclopedia > Jim Bowie
James Bowie

James Bowie (probably April 10, 1796 - March 6, 1836), aka Jim Bowie, was a nineteenth century pioneer and soldier who took a prominent part in the Texas Revolution and was killed at the Battle of the Alamo. He was born in Kentucky, and spent most of his life in Louisiana before moving to Texas and joining in the revolution. Possible source for this image is [1] which may in turn have obtained it from the Encarta Encyclopedia which may have sourced it from Culver Pictures, which appears to be an archival image library. ... Possible source for this image is [1] which may in turn have obtained it from the Encarta Encyclopedia which may have sourced it from Culver Pictures, which appears to be an archival image library. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (66th in leap years). ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The word woodsman, meaning man of the woods, can be applied to any person coming from or living in a wooded area. ... Modern soldiers. ... Combatants Republic of Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack {1,800 in assault-see below} 183 to 250 Casualties 370 to 600 total 70 to 200... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city Baton Rouge [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ...


Bowie is also known for the style of knife he carried, which came to be known as the "Bowie knife". Stories of his frontier spirit has made him one of the most colorful folk heroes of Texas history. Bowie knife is a term commonly used in modern times to refer to any large sheath knife. ... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ... A folk hero is type of hero, real or possibly mythological. ... The history of Texas (as part of the United States) began in 1845, but settlement of the region dates back to the end of the Upper Paleolithic Period, around 10,000 BC. Its history has been shaped by being part of six independent countries: Spain, France, Mexico, the Republic of...

Contents

Life

Early Years

Bowie was born in Logan County, Kentucky (now Simpson County) probably on April 10, 1796,[1] [2] [3] but spent most of his childhood in Louisiana. He was the son of Rezin (or Reason) Bowie and Elve Ap-Catesby Jones (or Johns). The family moved to Madrid in what is now Missouri in 1800, before settling in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana in 1801. Eight years later Rezin purchased 640 acres along the Vermilion River in Atakapa country.[2] Logan County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... Simpson County is a county located in the state of Kentucky. ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (101st in leap years). ... Year 1796 (MDCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city Baton Rouge [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St. ... Catahoula Parish is a parish located in the U.S. state of Louisiana. ...


During his early years, Bowie did a lot of hunting and fishing, and popular folklore says that he roped alligators, tamed wild horses, and trapped bears. As a teenager he worked in Avoyelles Parish and Rapides Parish, floating lumber to market along the bayous.[2] Avoyelles Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ... Rapides Parish is a parish located in the state of Louisiana. ...


During the War of 1812 Bowie and his brother Rezin Jr. joined the Louisiana militia company of Col. Colman Martin to fight the British at New Orleans. By the time the pair arrived in New Orleans in January 1815, the war had ended. They returned home and, despite the fact that the United States had outlawed the importation of slaves over seven years previously, entered the slave trade, purchasing illegally-acquired slaves from pirate Jean Lafitte and selling them in St. Landry Parish. Once they had collected $65,000, the brothers opted out of the slave trade and began speculating in land. Combatants United States Britain Canadian militia Eastern Woodland Indians Commanders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson George Prevost Isaac Brock† Tecumseh† Strength •U.S. Regular Army: 35,800 •Rangers: 3,049 •Militia: 458,463* •US Navy & US Marines: (at start of war): •Frigates:6 •Other vessels... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Jean Lafitte (1780? - 1826?), was a famous pirate in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 19th century. ... St. ...


Bowie knife

Apart from his sudden wealth, Bowie became known for his fiery temper. In 1826 Bowie challenged Norris Wright, the Rapides Parish sheriff and local banker, to a fight for refusing to make Bowie a loan. Bowie survived the fight by luck, as a bullet that Wright fired at him at point-blank range was deflected. To help ensure his safety, his older brother Rezin gave him a large knife to carry.[2] This now-legendary Bowie knife had a huge blade that was ten and one-half inches long and two inches wide. Bowie knife is a term commonly used in modern times to refer to any large sheath knife. ...


The following year Bowie gained regionwide recognition after he and his knife were involved in a brawl near Natchez, Mississippi, known as the Sandbar Fight, where several people died and he himself was wounded. The brawl was the result of an unsuccessful duel between Samuel Levi Wells III and Dr. Thomas Maddox, whose shots caused no damage. Following the duel, an onlooker shot and hit another bystander, and Bowie then shot and missed the original shooter. Looking to settle old scores, Wright fired and hit Bowie in the lower chest. Bowie, ignoring the injury, was said to have chased Wright with his Bowie knife. During the skirmish, several people assaulted Bowie with their knives, but Bowie, with his long blade, repelled the attacks and caused more damage. This fight cemented Bowie's reputation across the South as a superb knife-fighter, and soon men all over Texas were asking blacksmiths to make knives for them that were like Bowie's.[2] Melrose, an antebellum home in Natchez, Mississippi. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ...


Late 1820s

Bowie spent much of the late 1820s living in New Orleans and concentrating on his land speculations in southern Louisiana. In 1829 Bowie became engaged to Cecilia Wells, but she died in Alexandria on September 29, two weeks before their wedding.[2] New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Alexandria is a city in Louisiana and is the parish seat of Rapides Parish. ...


With his brothers Rezin and Stephen he established an 1800-acre (730-ha) sugarcane plantation known as Arcadia near Thibodaux, where they established the first steam-powered sugar mill in the state.[2] Thibodaux (pronounced TIB-uh-doe; IPA: ) is a small city located on the banks of Bayou Lafourche in northwestern Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. ...


Texas

Establishing himself

On January 1, 1830, Bowie and his friend Isaac Donoho left Thibodaux for Texas. They are documented as having stopped at Nacogdoches, at Jared E. Groce's farm on the Brazos River, and in San Felipe, where Bowie presented a letter of introduction to Stephen F. Austin from Thomas F. McKinney, one of the Old Three Hundred colonists. On February 20th Bowie and his friend took the oath of allegiance to Mexico and then proceeded to San Antonio. There, Bowie continued to speculate in land, supplementing his income with gambling and often falling into debt.[2] January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Official language(s) No Official Language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Stephen F. Austin Stephen Fuller Austin (November 3, 1793 – December 27, 1836), known as the Father of Texas, led the second and ultimately successful colonization of the region by the United States. ... Nickname: Alamo City; River City Location in the state of Texas Coordinates: Counties Bexar County Government  - Mayor Phil Hardberger Area  - City  412. ...


By the end of 1830 Bowie had been baptized into the Catholic Church and became a Mexican citizen. Because the terms of his citizenship stipulated that he would need to estabish textile mills in Coahuila, he arranged to purchase an existing mill. The following year, after grossly exaggerating his wealth (and underreporting his age), Bowie married Ursula Maria de Veramendi[4] (daughter of the Governor of the province of Texas).


San Saba Mine

Shortly after his marriage, Bowie became fascinated with the story of the "lost" Los Almagres Mine, said to be west of San Antonio near the ruin of Santa Cruz de San Sabá Mission. He quickly obtained permission from the Mexican government to mount an expedition into Indian territory to search for the legendary silver mine. On November 2nd, with his brother Rezin and nine others, Bowie set our for San Saba. Six miles from their goal, the group realized that they were being followed by a large Indian raiding party and stopped to negotiate. The attempts at parley failed, and Bowie and his group were forced to fight for their lives for the next thirteen hours. When the Indians finally retreated Bowie had reportedly lost only one man, while over 40 Indians had been killed and thirty more wounded.[2] Lost mines are a very popular form of lost treasure legend. ...


The group returned to San Antonio to recover and regroup. In January 1832 Bowie set out again with a larger force. After two and a half months of searching, the group returned home with nothing to show for their efforts.[2]


Texas Independence

Tension was beginning to rise between the Mexican officials and the mainly Anglo citizenry. In July 1832 Bowie, who was in Natchez, heard that the Mexican commader to Nacogdoches, Jose de las Piedras, had demanded that all residents in his area surrender their arms. Bowie returned to Texas and led 300 armed men in a siege of the garrison at Nacogdoches. After a battle in which Piedras lost thirty-three men, the Mexican army evacuated during the night. Bowie and eighteen companions ambushed the fleeing army, and, after Piedras fled, marched the soldiers back to Nacogdoches.[2]


The following fall, while Bowie was suffering from yellow fever in Natchez, his wife Ursula and their child (in addition to her parents), died during an outbreak of cholera.[2] Afterward, Bowie reportedly turned to the bottle.


Bowie returned to land speculation in Texas in 1834 after the Mexican government passed new laws allowing land sale in the state. He was appointed a land commissioner, tasked with promoting settlement in the area purchased by John T. Mason. His appointment ended in May 1835, when Santa Anna abolished the Coahuila-Texas government and ordered the arrest of all Texans (including Bowie) doing business in Monclova. Bowie was forced to flee Mexico and return to the San Felipe-Nacogdoches area of Texas.[2] Santa Anna is a name referring to different meanings: In Spanish (where is equivalent to Santa Ana) and in Italian language, Santa Anna is the name of Saint Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary. ...


Santa Anna began preparing for war, sending large numbers of Mexican troops to Texas as the Anglos in Texas began agitating for war. Bowie worked with William B. Travis, the leader of the War Party, to gain support for war, with Bowie even visiting several Indian villages in East Texas to try to convince the reulctant tribes to fight against Mexico.[2] William Travis William Barret Travis (August 1 or 9, 1809 – March 6, 1836) was a 19th Century lawyer and soldier. ...


Stephen F. Austin returned to Texas in September 1835 and was soon elected the commander of the volunteer army in Texas. Bowie joined the army with a small party of friends from Louisiana, and Austin quickly named him a colonel. On the orders of Austin and General Sam Houston, who commanded the Texas regular army, Bowie and Captain James W. Fannin scouted the area south of Bexar. On the 28th of October, a Mexican force consisting of 300 cavalry and 100 infantry attacked Bowie and his ninety-two horseman. At the end of the skirmish Bowie had lost only one man, while the Mexican army suffered 16 fatalities and had sixteen men wounded.[2] Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... James Fannin James Walker Fannin, Jr. ...


Following the battle, Bowie tried several times to resign his commission, preferring to contribute to fights when needed but less interested in holding a formal command. After a brief absence from the army, he returned in late November, and, accompanied by 30 cavalry, successfully took a train guarded by Mexican troops which carried food for the Mexican garrison livestock in a class known as the Grass Fight.[2] The Grass Fight was a battle // between the Republic of Mexico and the rebelling Texas colonists in the Mexican GO TEXAS Dudes state of Coahuila y Texas. ...


The Alamo

In January 1836, Bowie arrived in Bexar with a detachment of 30 men. Although his orders were to demolish the fortifications there, Bowie wrote to the Governor urging that the Alamo be held as it was a strategic spot. Bowie and his men joined the seventy-nine men already at the Alamo, and were joined in the next few weeks by William Travis, with 30 men, and Davy Crockett, with twelve additional men. After the Alamo's commander, Colonel James C. Neill, left the mission, the men elected Bowie as their commander; he celebrated by getting drunk. After that spectacle, Bowie agreed to share responsibility with Travis.[2] Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack {1,800 in assault-see below} 183 to 250 Casualties 370 to 600 total 70 to 200... Davy Crockett Colonel David Crockett (August 17, 1786 – March 6, 1836) was a celebrated 19th-century American folk hero, frontiersman, soldier and politician; usually referred to as Davy Crockett and by the popular title King of the Wild Frontier. He represented Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives, served... James Clinton Neill (1790–1845) was a 19th Century soldier and politician, most noted for his role in the Texas Revolution and the early defense of the Alamo. ...


The Mexican army, with 1500 cavalrymen, arrived in Bexar in late February and demanded that the Texas surrender. Bowie refused, but collapsed on February 24, most likely from advanced tuberculosis and was confined to a cot in his quarters. He perished with the 187 other Alamo defenders on March 6th, when the Mexicans attacked. His body was identified by Bexar mayor Francisco Ruiz and Santa Anna chose to personally observe his corpse to verify that he was dead.[2] Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for Tubercle Bacillus) is a common and deadly infectious disease that is caused by mycobacteria, primarily Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...


Jim Bowie in Popular Culture

Film

  • The Painted Stallion (1937) is a 1820s wagon train drama directed by Alan James, Ray Taylor, and William Witney. Jim Bowie is played by Wally Wales.
  • Heroes of the Alamo (1937), directed by Harry L. Fraser. Jim Bowie is played by Roger Williams.
  • Man of Conquest (1939), directed by George Nichols, Jr.. A biographical drama of Sam Houston. Jim Bowie is played by Robert Armstrong.
  • Comanche Territory (1950), directed by George Sherman, features Jim Bowie (played by MacDonald Carey).
  • The Iron Mistress (1952), directed by Gordon Douglas, depicts a New Orleans love affair between Jim Bowie (played by Alan Ladd) and the fictional Judalon de Bornay (played by Virginia Mayo).
  • Walt Disney's Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier (1954), directed by Norman Foster. Jim Bowie (played by Kenneth Tobey) is a side-character.
  • The Last Command (1955), an Alamo film directed by Frank Lloyd. Jim Bowie is played by Sterling Hayden.
  • The First Texan] (1956), directed by Byron Haskin and set at the Alamo. Jim Bowie is played by Jeff Morrow.
  • The Alamo (1960), directed by John Wayne, who also stars as Davy Crockett. Jim Bowie is played by Richard Widmark.
  • Houston: The Legend of Texas (1986), a made-for-TV movie directed by Peter Levin. Jim Bowie is played by Michael Beck.
  • The Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory (1987), a made-for-TV movie directed by Burt Kennedy. Jim Bowie is played by James Arness.
  • Texas (1994), a made-for-TV movie directed by Richard Lang. Jim Bowie is played by David Keith.
  • Two for Texas (1998), directed by Rod Hardy. A made-for-TV movie about two chain gang prisoners who escape and join Sam Houston's army. Jim Bowie is played by Peter Coyote.
  • The Alamo (2004), yet another retelling of the Battle of the Alamo, this time a major motion picture produced by Touchstone Pictures. Bowie is played by Jason Patric.

Alan James is the bandleader of Powerhouse,[1] a leading event entertainment group based in Naples, Florida. ... Ray Taylor was a fictional character in the BBC soap opera EastEnders, played by Dorian Lough. ... William Witney (born 15 May 1915 in Lawton, Oklahoma, United States – died 17 March 2002 in Jackson, California, United States) was a Film Director. ... Roger Williams could mean: Roger Williams University Roger Williams (theologian), co-founder of Rhode Island Roger Williams (soldier) Roger Williams (pianist), American pianist Roger Williams (UK politician), British politician Roger Williams (US politician), US Texas politician Roger Williams (hepatologist), a British liver specialist Roger Williams (trombonist) Roger Williams (activist) This... Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793–July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician and soldier. ... Robert Armstrong is a character in James Clavells novel Noble House. ... George Sherman (July 14, 1908-March 15, 1991) was a prolific film director of action movies beginning in the 1930s. ... Macdonald Carey Macdonald Carey (March 15, 1913 – March 21, 1994) was an American actor best known for his role as the patriarch Dr. Tom Horton on NBCs soap opera Days of our Lives. ... Gordon Douglas could refer to one of the following: Gordon Douglas, ordained the first Western monk in Buddhism in 1899. ... Alan Walbridge Ladd (September 3, 1913 – November 7, 1964) was an American film actor. ... Virginia Mayo (November 30, 1920 – January 17, 2005) was an American film actress. ... Film director and movie actor Norman Foster (December 13, 1900 - July 7, 1976) may be best remembered for being married twice - both times to leading ladies. ... Kenneth Tobey (Born March 23, 1917—December 22, 2002) was an American television and film actor. ... Frank Lloyd (born 2 February 1886 in Glasgow, UK, died 10 August 1960 in Santa Monica, California, United States) was a film director, scriptwriter and producer. ... Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 - May 23, 1986) was an American actor. ... Byron Conrad Haskin (April 22, 1899 – April 16, 1984) was an American film and television director. ... Irving Jeff Morrow (b. ... John Wayne (May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), born Marion Robert Morrison[1] and later changed to Marion Michael Morrison, popularly known as the Duke, was an iconic, Academy Award winning, American film actor. ... Davy Crockett Colonel David Crockett (August 17, 1786 – March 6, 1836) was a celebrated 19th-century American folk hero, frontiersman, soldier and politician; usually referred to as Davy Crockett and by the popular title King of the Wild Frontier. He represented Tennessee in the U.S. House of Representatives, served... Richard Widmark in Kiss of Death Richard Widmark (born December 26, 1914 in Sunrise, Minnesota) is an Academy Award-nominated American film actor. ... Michael Beck (born February 4, 1949 in Memphis, Tennessee, USA) is an American actor born as John Michael Beck Taylor. ... Burt Kennedy (September 3, 1922 - February 15, 2001) was a American screenwriter and director known for mainly directing film Westerns. ... James Arness James Arness (originally Aurness) (born May 26, 1923 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an actor best known for portraying Marshal Matt Dillon on Gunsmoke for 20 years, a record length for a character on a single prime time show (though the length of time in a role is shared... David Keith (born May 8, 1954 in Knoxville, Tennessee) is an American actor and director. ... Image:Petercoyoteheadshot02feb06. ... The current logo for Touchstone Pictures films since 2002 Touchstone Pictures (also known as Touchstone Films in its early years) is one of several alternate film labels of The Walt Disney Company, established in 1984. ... Roger Ebert, Peter OToole, and Jason Patric at the 2004 Savannah Film Festival. ...

Television

  • The Adventures of Jim Bowie (1956-1958), set in 1830s Louisiana Territory. Jim Bowie is played by Scott Forbes.
  • The scifi series The Time Tunnel featured Jim Bowie in an episode entitled "The Alamo" (1966). Jim Bowie is played by Jim Davis.
  • The children's scifi series Into the Labrynth featured Jim Bowie in an episode entitled "Alamo" (1981). Jim Bowie is played by Norman Bowler.
  • The PBS anthology series American Playhouse featured Jim Bowie in an episode entitled "Seguin" (1982). Jim Bowie is played by Tex Hill.
  • The Steven Spielberg series Amazing Stories featured Jim Bowie in an episode entitled "Alamo Jobe" (1985). Jim Bowie is played by Jon Van Ness.

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Marlin Jim Davis (August 26, 1909 - April 26, 1981) was an American character actor who appeared in motion pictures from the 1940s to the 1980s. ... Norman Bowler Norman Bowler is a British actor. ... Steven Allan Spielberg KBE (born December 18, 1946) is an American film director and producer. ...

Literature

  • Bowie: A Novel (2000), by Randy Lee Eickhoff and Leonard C. Lewis.
  • Red Ripper (2000), by Kerry Newcomb.
  • Deep in the Heart (2003), by Gilbert Morris.
  • The Crystal City (2003), by Orson Scott Card.
  • The Iron Mistress (novel) by Paul Wellman

Gilbert Morris, (1929-) is a Christy Award winning, prolific Christian author. ... Orson Scott Card (born August 24, 1951)[1] is an American author, working in numerous genres. ...

Music

David Robert Jones, an aspiring rock star in the 1960s, feared his name was too similar to Davy Jones, a member of already famous The Monkees. David Jones chose to use the stage name "Bowie" after Jim Bowie, and subsequently became David Bowie. Davy Jones, 1967 Davy Jones redirects here, for other uses see David Jones. ... The Monkees were a pop-rock quartet created and based in Los Angeles in 1965 for an NBC American television series of the same name. ... David Bowie (IPA: []) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger and audio engineer. ...


Punk Rock band The Dickies wrote a song about Bowie called "Jim Bowie" The Dickies are a punk rock group formed in Los Angeles, California in 1977. ...


Bowie is often mentioned in Alamo based country songs, including "The Ballad of the Alamo" by Marty Robbins(which has also been covered by Texas country arists Brian Burns and K.R. Woods), "The Sons of San Antone" by Michael Shane Borden, and multiple tracks from K.R. Wood's Fathers of Texas album. Marty Robbins, (September 26, 1925, Glendale, Arizona - December 8, 1982), was an American Country & Western Hall of Fame musician. ...


References

  1. ^ Goodson, Steve. Bowie. TextFiles.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-22.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Handbook of Texas, retrieved on 2006-12-26; the located described corresponds to 36°46′26″N, 86°42′10″W
  3. ^ Kentucky Historical Society, retrieved on 2006-12-26
  4. ^ Handbook of Texas, retrieved on 2007-2-23

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... December 22 is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Edmondson, J.R.; The Alamo Story-From History to Current Conflicts; Republic of Texas Press; ISBN 1-55622-678-0
  • Hopewell, Clifford; James Bowie-Texas Fighting Man; Eakin Press; ISBN 0-89015-881-9

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jim Bowie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (766 words)
James Bowie (1796 - March 6, 1836), aka Jim Bowie, was a 19th century pioneer and soldier who took a prominent part in the Texas Revolution and was killed at the Battle of the Alamo.
Bowie is also known for the style of knife he carried, which came to be known as the "Bowie knife".
Bowie's first famous display of courage was participating in a brawl near Natchez, Mississippi where several people died and he himself was wounded.
Bowie knife - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1394 words)
Jim Bowie's older brother John claimed that the knife at the Sandbar Fight was not Cleft's knife, but a knife specifically made for Bowie by a flsmith named Snowden.
The most famous version of the Bowie knife was designed by Jim Bowie and presented to Arkansas flsmith James Black in the form of a carved wooden model in December of 1830.
Bowie returned, with his knife, to Texas and was involved in a knife fight with three men who had been hired to kill him.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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