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Encyclopedia > Jim Aparo
Jim Aparo
Jim Aparo

James N. "Jim" Aparo (1932-July 19, 2005) was a comic book artist best known for his work on various Batman stories for DC Comics. Aparo's style was primarily in the tradition of his influential contemporary Neal Adams, striving for realistic renditions of his subject rather than caricature or exaggeration. Aparo's muscular figures tended to be leaner than those drawn by most of his peers. He paid particular attention to detail in rendering vehicles, "street clothes", architecture, and landscape. He frequently tilted the viewpoint so that the horizon line in a panel was significantly angled away from level, and used props such as potted plants and furniture to emphasize depth in a setting. He was also known for inserting drawings of celebrities (such as Humphrey Bogart, Peter Falk, Ed McMahon, and Fred Allen) as background characters in heavily-populated scenes. Image File history File links source:home. ... 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... July 19 is the 200th day (201st in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 165 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The comic book character Batman, originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman, is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Cover to Green Lantern #76, April 1970. ... Caricature of Alan Greenspan by Jan Op De Beeck. ... Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957) was an iconic American actor who retains legendary status decades after his death. ... DVD cover of Columbo - The Complete First Season Peter Falk (born September 16, 1927 of Jewish immigrants from Russia and Hungary) is an American actor. ... Ed McMahon During One of Johnny Carsons Monologues on the Tonight Show Ed McMahon (born Edward Leo Peter McMahon Jr. ... Fred Allen and wife Portland Hoffa Fred Allen (May 31, 1894 – March 17, 1956) was a United States comedian best known for his witty, pointed radio programs of the 1930s and 1940s, including a comic feud with comedian Jack Benny. ...


Aparo was primarily self-trained as an artist. He attempted to enter the comic book profession in his early 20's, approaching EC Comics, which declined to hire him. He then worked in the advertising industry in Connecticut, often drawing fashion illustrations for newspaper advertisements. He continued to pursue a career in comic books and comic strips while working in advertising. Entertaining Comics was headed by William Gaines but is better known by its publishing name of EC Comics. ...


His first break in the comics field was with a comic strip called "Stern Wheeler," written by Ralph Kanna, which was published in 1963 in a Hartford, Connecticut newspaper for less than a year. In 1966, editor Dick Giordano at Charlton Comics hired him as a comic book artist, where his first assignment was a humorous character called "Miss Bikini Luv" in "Go-Go Comics." This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (July 20, 1932 - ) is a United States comic book artist and editor. ... Charlton Comics was a minor comic book publishing house that existed from 1946 to 1986, best known for several of its characters and some of the noteworthy creators who worked for it. ...


Over the next few years at Charlton, Aparo drew stories in many genres--Westerns, science fiction, romance, horror, mystery, and suspense. Most of his work was for standalone stories in anthology titles, but there were a few notable continuing series that featured Aparo art:

  • Thane of Bagarth was a historical adventure that ran as a backup in "Hercules".
  • Nightshade was a superheroine that ran as a backup in "Captain Atom".
  • Wander was a science fiction/Western/comedy that ran as a backup in "Cheyenne Kid".
  • The Phantom was the title character of a comic book based on Lee Falk's newspaper strip.

Aparo was notable for being one of the relatively few artists in mainstream comics at that time to serve as penciller, inker, and letterer for all of his work. These tasks were typically divided between two or more artists, leading most of his contemporaries to specialize in a single area, and allowing editors to pipeline the preparation of comic book art in order to speed production. Captain Atom (DC version) as depicted in Justice League Unlimited Captain Atom is a fictional character, a comic book superhero. ... The Phantom is a comic strip created by Lee Falk (also creator of Mandrake the Magician), recounting the adventures of a costumed crime-fighter called the Phantom. ... Lee Falk (April 28, 1911 - March 13, 1999) was an American writer, best known as the creator of the popular comic strip superheroes Mandrake the Magician and The Phantom. ... In the collaborative method of producing a comic book used to create the majority of the comics published by major US publishers, the penciller (or penciler) is the artist who interprets the story created by the writer as comics pages drawn in pencil. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... In comic books, the letterer is the person who draws the letters in the word balloons, draws in sound effects and usually designs a books logo. ...


In the late 1960's, Dick Giordano left Charlton for an editorial position at DC Comics and offered Aparo a job drawing the Aquaman comic book. After an initial issue (#40) for which Aparo provided only pencil art, Aparo resumed producing pencils, inks, and letters for most issues of the series until its cancellation. Aparo continued for a time to provide art to Charlton for The Phantom, alternating between the two series month by month (both series were being released on a bimonthly basis at the time). Richard Joseph Dick Giordano (July 20, 1932 - ) is a United States comic book artist and editor. ... The current DC Comics logo, adopted in May 2005. ... Aquaman is a DC Comics superhero. ... The Phantom is a comic strip created by Lee Falk (also creator of Mandrake the Magician), recounting the adventures of a costumed crime-fighter called the Phantom. ...


Eventually Aparo resigned his assignment on The Phantom and worked almost exclusively for the remainder of his career for DC Comics. Aparo's next series assignment at DC was Phantom Stranger. After Aquaman was cancelled, the bimonthly frequency of Phantom Stranger was insufficient to fill his typical production rate of one page per day, so DC assigned him several short jobs such as mystery stories for House of Mystery and House of Secrets. The Phantom is a comic strip created by Lee Falk (also creator of Mandrake the Magician), recounting the adventures of a costumed crime-fighter called the Phantom. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ... House of Mystery was a horror anthology comic book series published by DC Comics. ... House of Secrets was a horror anthology comic book series published by DC Comics. ...


In 1971, Aparo was assigned a fill-in job as the artist for The Brave and the Bold #98. This series routinely featured team-ups of DC's Batman with other characters, in this case, the Phantom Stranger. As the regular artist on the Phantom Stranger's own series, Aparo was considered an appropriate choice. The editor of Brave and Bold soon assigned Aparo the regular artistic responsibilities for the series, which he continued until its cancellation with issue 200, missing only a few issues. The Brave and the Bold was a DC Comics superhero comic book which was published from August 1955 to July 1983. ... The comic book character Batman, originally and still sometimes referred to as The Batman, is a fictional character who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


During the more than 10 years as the artist for Brave and Bold, its bimonthly frequency permitted Aparo to do many other significant works for DC. In addition to numerous covers, he served as the regular artist for a notorious series starring a ruthless avenging ghost called The Spectre, which ran in Adventure Comics, and which in 2005 was collected in a trade paperback edition. He also provided art for a revival of Aquaman in both Adventure Comics and a continuation of the previously-cancelled Aquaman. He was assigned the solo Batman series in Detective Comics for a rather short time and drew occasional stories for anthology series. Cover to The Spectre #31, November 1989. ... Adventure Comics was a comic book published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ... Categories: Comics stubs | Batman | DC Comics titles ...


When Brave and Bold was cancelled in 1983, it was replaced with a series called Batman and the Outsiders, a superhero team led by Batman. This series, which Aparo co-created with writer Mike W. Barr, ran for several years, continuing with an Outsiders series that did not include Batman. For the final few issues, DC finally requested that Aparo provide only pencils, and a long and nearly unbroken string of Aparo inking and lettering his own work came mostly to an end. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Outsiders is a fictional superhero team, produced by DC Comics. ...

The scene from Batman #428 (1988), in which Batman discovers Jason Todd dead
The scene from Batman #428 (1988), in which Batman discovers Jason Todd dead

Aparo's next major work consisted of pencils for Batman and Detective Comics, where his art was almost always inked by Mike DeCarlo. Perhaps the most notable product of this period remains "A Death in the Family" (Batman #426-429, 1988-9), depicting the death of Jason Todd (Robin). Aparo continued to draw Batman stories in Detective and Batman until the early 90's. For a while in 1992, Aparo was again asked to provide pencils, inks, and lettering for his Batman stories, but was soon returned to contributing only pencil art. inside panel of jason todds death, fan site, think is ok by fair use File links The following pages link to this file: Robin (comics) Batman: A Death in the Family Categories: Images with unknown source | Batman images ... inside panel of jason todds death, fan site, think is ok by fair use File links The following pages link to this file: Robin (comics) Batman: A Death in the Family Categories: Images with unknown source | Batman images ... Mike DeCarlo is an American artist of comic books. ... Batman: A Death in the Family is a Batman comic book story arc first published in the late 1980s which gave fans the ability to influence the story through voting with a 900 number. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... DC was initially hesitant to turn Dick Grayson, the original Robin, into Nightwing and to replace him with a new Robin. ...


In 1992, Aparo was given his last regular series assignment for DC as pencil artist for Green Arrow issues 81-100. Following that assignment, Aparo's work appeared infrequently, when Aparo was mostly assigned occasional Batman-related stories and covers in miniseries and specials. His published work in the late 90's and early 2000's include a Batman Annual, a G.C.P.D. miniseries, a Speed Force Special (featuring The Flash), an issue of a Deadman miniseries that revisited his "Death in the Family" story, and a single page of "Legends of the Green Flame" written by Neil Gaiman in which he had a final opportunity to draw the Phantom Stranger. Green Arrow (Oliver Ollie Queen) is a DC Comics superhero. ... The Flash is a DC Comics superhero possessing super-speed, nicknamed Created by Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert, the original Flash first appeared in Flash Comics #1 (1940). ... Deadman is a DC Comics superhero created by Arnold Drake and Carmine Infantino in the comic book series, Strange Adventures, specifically in issue #205 (October 1967). ... Neil Gaiman (November 2004) Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960 in Portchester, England) is an English Jewish author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many comic books. ... The Phantom Stranger is a fictional character of unspecified paranormal origins who battles mysterious and occult forces in various titles published by DC Comics, sometimes under their Vertigo imprint. ...


In his retirement, Aparo sold many of the original art pages produced over his long career. His most recent work for DC was the cover for the trade paperback "Batman in the Eighties", published in 2004. TwoMorrows Publishing has announced The Brave and Bold Art of Jim Aparo (ISBN 1893905497), a book that will focus on Aparo's work, to be published in Fall 2005. // Overview Started by John and Pam Morrow out of their small advertising agency in Raleigh, North Carolina, TwoMorrows Publishing has grown to be one of the lights of the world of Comics Fandom, publishing magazines, books, and DVDs all devoted to the history and preservation of Comic Books, and, more...


Aparo died early on July 19, 2005. Some reports attributed the cause of death to "a long battle with cancer," but his family's formal announcement (through his art agent Spencer Beck) attributed his death to "complications relating to a recent illness" and the AP obituary reported that "Aparo died Tuesday at home after a short illness, said his daughter, Donna Aparo.".


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jim Aparo 1932 - 2005 | ART and ARTIFICE (760 words)
Though his figures are typically elegantly muscular, Aparo did not draw (for example) abdominal muscles in the fashion that modern superhero artists do, he instead seemed at times to try and suggest clothing folds and wrinkles around the waistline.
In the 1980s, Aparo used a shorthand outline drawing style that looks significantly more caricatured and "cartoony" compared to his earlier work, though is still identifiable as Aparo.
Aparo is noted for having penciled, inked and lettered his own work.
Near-Mint Heroes: R.I.P. Jim Aparo (908 words)
Aparo was notable for being one of the relatively few artists in mainstream comics at that time to serve as penciler, inker, and letterer for all of his work.
Jim's work on Brave and the Bold was his favorite work of his time at DC as he truly considered the series his "baby." Also during this period Jim did one of the seminal runs on The Spectre, where his realistic style made the Ghostly character truly come to life.
Jim Aparo defined Batman and many of the other characters in th DC Universe for me. I always hoped for a his return to some of DC's titles, particularly the Batman, and I'm saddened that we won't ever see any new work by one of the greats again.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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