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Encyclopedia > Jiang Wei
Jiang Wei
Qing Dynasty illustration.
Regent of Shu Han
Born 202
Died 264
Names
Simplified Chinese 姜维
Traditional Chinese 姜維
Pinyin Jiāng Wéi
Wade-Giles Chiang Wei
Courtesy name Bóyuē (伯約)

Jiang Wei (202 - 264) was a miltary general and later regent of Shu Han during the Three Kingdoms era of China. He was originally a Cao Wei middle-level military officer, but joined Shu Han strategist Zhuge Liang on Zhuge's first Northern Expedition against Cao Wei in 228. Zhuge Liang became impressed with Jiang Wei and immediately made him an army commander. He eventually rose through the ranks during the regencies of Zhuge Liang and of Zhuge Liang's successors Jiang Wan and Fei Yi to eventually become Fei Yi's chief assistant. After Fei Yi's death in 253, he succeeded to Fei Yi's position, but did not have the power that Fei Yi had, as he apparently became in charge largely only of military matters -- and therefore was only arguably a regent. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 340 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (361 × 637 pixels, file size: 67 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Flag (1890-1912) Anthem Gong Jinou (1911) Qing China at its greatest extent. ... The Kingdom of Shu (蜀 shǔ) (221 – 263) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... Events Roman law bans female gladiators Deaths Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyon (martyred) Perpetua (martyred) Felicitas (martyred) Yuan Shao, Chinese warlord Categories: 202 ... Events Sun Hao succeeds Sun Xiu as ruler of the Chinese kingdom of Wu Births Deaths Deng Ai, Wei general Jiang Wei, Shu general,Grand Commander and strategist, and foster son of Zhuge Liang Zhang Yi, Shu general Zhong Hui, Wei general Categories: 264 ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Traditional Chinese (Traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字, Simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字) refers to one of two standard sets of printed Chinese characters. ... Pinyin, more formally called Hanyu Pinyin (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is the most common variant of Standard Mandarin romanization system in use. ... Wade-Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a Romanization (phonetic notation and transliteration) system for the Chinese language based on Mandarin. ... A Chinese style name, sometimes also known as a courtesy name, is an extra name that could be used in place of the given name. ... Events Roman law bans female gladiators Deaths Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyon (martyred) Perpetua (martyred) Felicitas (martyred) Yuan Shao, Chinese warlord Categories: 202 ... Events Sun Hao succeeds Sun Xiu as ruler of the Chinese kingdom of Wu Births Deaths Deng Ai, Wei general Jiang Wei, Shu general,Grand Commander and strategist, and foster son of Zhuge Liang Zhang Yi, Shu general Zhong Hui, Wei general Categories: 264 ... The Kingdom of Shu (蜀 shǔ) (221 – 263) was one of the Three Kingdoms competing for control of China after the fall of the Han Dynasty. ... The Three Kingdoms period (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a period in the history of China, part of an era of disunity called the Six Dynasties. ... The territories of Cao Wei (in yellow), AD 262 Capital Luoyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 220 - 226 Cao Pi  - 226 - 239 Cao Rui  - 239 - 254 Cao Fang  - 254 - 260 Cao Mao  - 260 - 265 Cao Huan Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Cao Pi taking over the throne of the Later... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Zhuge (諸葛) Zhuge Liang (181 - 234) was one of the greatest Chinese strategists of the Three Kingdoms period, as well as a statesman, engineer, scholar, and inventor. ... Combatants Cao Wei Shu Han Qiang Commanders Cao Zhen Sima Yi Zhuge Liang† For Chiang Kai-sheks Northern Expedition in modern China, see Northern Expedition. ... The Praetorian guard kill Ulpian, Praetorian prefect, who had wanted to reduce their privileges. ... Jiang Wan (? - 246 AD) was an officer of the Shu Kingdom. ... Fei Yi (費禕) (d. ... For the book see 253 (book). ...


Reviving Zhuge Liang's campaigns against Cao Wei (which Jiang Wan and Fei Yi had largely abandoned), Jiang Wei made a number of incursions against Wei -- one in coordination with Eastern Wu's regent Zhuge Ke (Zhuge Liang's nephew) -- but each had to be abandoned due to the inadequate food supplies or due to battlefield losses, and these campaigns greatly drained Shu Han's resources. In 263, Wei, led by Deng Ai and Zhong Hui, conquered Shu Han. Jiang Wei tried to restore the kingdom by persuading Zhong Hui to declare a rebellion against the de facto Cao Wei ruler Sima Zhao, Zhong Hui agreed but after he did so, Zhong's own soldiers rebelled against him and Jiang Wei and Zhong Hui were killed in battle. The territories of Eastern Wu (in green), AD 262 Capital Jianye Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 222 - 252 Sun Quan  - 252 - 258 Sun Liang  - 258 - 264 Sun Xiu  - 264 - 280 Sun Hao Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Establishment 222  - Sun Quan declares himself emperor 229  - Conquest of Wu by Jin... This article lacks information on the subject matters importance. ... Events The Wei Kingdom conquered the kingdom of Shu Han, one of the Chinese Three Kingdoms. ... Deng Ai (鄧艾) was a talented young officer of the Kingdom of Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ... Zhong Hui (鍾會) was a general of the Wei Kingdom during the Three Kingdoms period in China. ... Sima Zhao (司馬昭) (211-264) was the son of Prime Minister Sima Yi of the Kingdom of Wei, during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. ...

Contents

Early life and career under Zhuge Liang's regency

Jiang Wei was born during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and was from Tianshui Commandery . His father Jiang Jiong (姜冏) was a military officer who was killed in battle during a Qiang rebellion, early in Jiang Wei's life. Because of what happened to his father, Jiang Wei became a military general himself for Cao Wei, Han's successor state. The Han Dynasty (Traditional Chinese characters: 漢朝, Simplified Chinese characters: 汉朝, pinyin Hàncháo 202 BC - AD 220) followed the Qin Dynasty and preceded the Three Kingdoms in China. ... Tianshui (Chinese: 天水; pinyin: ) is the second largest city in Gansu province in northwest China. ... The Qiang people (羌族; Pinyin: qiāng zú) are an ethnic group. ... The territories of Cao Wei (in yellow), AD 262 Capital Luoyang Language(s) Chinese Government Monarchy Emperor  - 220 - 226 Cao Pi  - 226 - 239 Cao Rui  - 239 - 254 Cao Fang  - 254 - 260 Cao Mao  - 260 - 265 Cao Huan Historical era Three Kingdoms  - Cao Pi taking over the throne of the Later...


For reasons unknown, when Liu Shan's regent Zhuge Liang had his first northern expedition in 228, Jiang Wei's commanding officer suspected him of secretly wishing to join Zhuge Liang, and once, when Jiang Wei was outside the city walls with his troops, they closed the city gates and would not allow Jiang Wei to re-enter. Jiang Wei was forced to indeed defect to Zhuge's army, leaving his mother in Cao Wei. Zhuge was impressed by Jiang Wei's military capabilities and quickly made him one of his leading officers, at the age of 27. Liu Shan, (commonly mispronounced as Liu Chan[1]), (207 – 271) was the second and last emperor of the Kingdom of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ... The Praetorian guard kill Ulpian, Praetorian prefect, who had wanted to reduce their privileges. ...


Under Jiang Wan and Fei Yi's regencies

After Zhuge Liang's death in 234, Jiang Wan succeeded him as regent. He continued to value Jiang Wei's capabilities greatly, and he commissioned Jiang Wei with the title of the governor of Liang Province (涼州, modern Gansu), which Shu Han did not control, but effectively giving Jiang Wei the authority over the northwestern border. After Jiang Wan's death in 245, Fei Yi succeeded him and made Jiang Wei his chief assistant. Events Wei Yan revolts against the kingdom of Shu Han Births Emperor Wu of Jin China (approximate date) Deaths Li Yan, general of the Shu Kingdom Wei Yan, Shu general, executed by Ma Dai Zhuge Liang of the Shu Kingdom in China, dies on the Wu Zhang Plains in a... Jiang Wan (? - 246 AD) was an officer of the Shu Kingdom. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Events Roman emperor Philip the Arabian entrusted future emperor Gaius Messius Quintus Trajanus with an important command on the Danube Trieu Thi Trinh Vietnamese warrior women begins her three year resistance against the invading Chinese. ... Fei Yi (費禕) (d. ...


Jiang Wei had constantly wanted to revive Zhuge Liang's strategy of actively waging war against Cao Wei, and Fei Yi agreed -- but only partly. He gave Jiang Wei a small detachment of troops to allow Jiang to harass Cao Wei's border defense forces, and Jiang Wei appeared to be fairly effective at this task. He also was successful in persuading a number of non-Han tribes into joining Shu.


As regent

After Fei Yi's assassination in 253, Jiang Wei took over Fei's position, making him regent -- but his influence on domestic matters appeared to be limited, as those matters appeared to be dominated by Liu Shan's trusted eunuch Huang Hao. Jiang Wei, however, was the supreme authority in military matters. Jiang Wei attempted to strengthen Shu, however, its government's efficiency and cleanliness were deteriorating from within, greatly hindering Jiang's efforts and magnifying the effect of Jiang's losses on the battlefield. For the book see 253 (book). ... Huang Hao was a eunuch serving Liu Shan, second and last emperor of the Kingdom of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era in ancient China. ...


Campaigns against Cao Wei

Jiang Wei immediately revived Zhuge Liang's northern strategy, and later in 253 he set up a coordinated effort with Eastern Wu's regent Zhuge Ke to attack Cao Wei on two fronts -- Shu Han on the west and Eastern Wu on the east. Jiang Wei attacked the key border city of Didao (狄道, in modern Dingxi, Gansu) as Zhuge Ke launched a massive attack on Hefei. Cao Wei's regent Sima Shi correctly judged the Wu force to be the more serious threat and personally led the main Cao Wei force to the eastern front while sending a smaller detachment to relieve Didao. As the first sign of what would eventually recur, Jiang, while sieging Didao, ran out of food supplies and had to withdraw. Eventually, Sima's forces dealt a crippling defeat to Zhuge Ke, leading to Zhuge Ke's downfall later that year. Dingxi (simplified Chinese: 定西; pinyin: Dìng xÄ«) is a prefecture-level city in Chinas Gansu province. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Hefei (Chinese: 合肥; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Hofei) is a prefecture-level city and the provincial capital of Anhui province, China. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


In 254, Jiang, after Li Jian (李簡), the county magistrate of Didao secretly declared that he would defect, again advanced on Didao and took the city, but after suffering a loss at the hands of Xu Zhi (徐質), Jiang Wei was forced to withdraw. A cosmic number. ...


In the summer of 255, despite the opposition from Zhang Yi (under the rationale that Shu Han could not sustain continuous campaigns against Cao Wei), Jiang again attacked Didao, and was highly successful in his initial battles against the Cao Wei Yong Province (雍州, modern Shaanxi) governor Wang Jing (王經), nearly annihilating Wang's troops. Zhang Yi again tried to persuade Jiang Wei to stop his campaign at this point, but Jiang refused. Instead, he sieged Didao again and eventually was forced to lift the siege when additional Cao Wei forces arrived under the command of Chen Tai. Jiang Wei and Chen Tai's forces remained in a stalemate throughout the entire winter. In the summer of 256, as Jiang Wei shifted his strategy to advance instead on Shanggui (上邽, in modern Tianshui, Gansu), his move was anticipated by the Wei general Deng Ai, who intercepted him and dealt him a major loss -- a loss that would cause the people of Shu to begin to resent Jiang. Events Births Deaths Wuqiu Jian, general of the Kingdom of Wei Categories: 255 ... Zhang Yi (張翼, Zi 伯恭) (AD ??? - 264) was a general originally from Wuyang. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the... Chen Tai (陳泰; ?-260) a notable minister of Wei, and the son of Chen Qun. ... Events Births Arius, founder of Arianism Deaths Invasions Goths invade Asia Minor. ... Tianshui (Chinese: 天水; pinyin: ) is the second largest city in Gansu province in northwest China. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


In 257, when the Cao Wei was dealing with the rebellion of Zhuge Dan (who had anticipated an usurpation by Sima Shi's brother and successor Sima Zhao and wanted to resist it), Jiang Wei again attacked, this time advancing all the way to Mangshui (芒水, in modern Xi'an, Shaanxi), but could not induce Cao Wei's forces, commanded by Deng Ai and Sima Wang, to engage him in battle. After Zhuge was defeated in 258, Jiang withdrew. Events Pope Sixtus II succeeds Pope Stephen I Births Saint Gregory the Illuminator, founder and patron saint of the Armenian Church (approximate date) Deaths Pope Stephen I Categories: 257 ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Sima Zhao (司馬昭) (211-264) was the son of Prime Minister Sima Yi of the Kingdom of Wei, during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. ... Xian redirects here. ...   (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ShÇŽnxÄ«; Wade-Giles: Shan-hsi; Postal map spelling: Shensi) is a north-central province of the Peoples Republic of China, and includes portions of the Loess Plateau on the middle reaches of the Yellow River as well as the Qinling Mountains across the... Sima Wang (205 - 271) served the Kingdom of Wei, and later, the Jin Dynasty as a general during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. ... Events Sun Xiu succeeds Sun Liang as ruler of the Chinese kingdom of Wu The Goths ravage Asia Minor and Trabzon Gaul, Britain and Spain break off from the Roman Empire to form the Gallic Empire Nanjing University first founded in Nanjing, China Births Emperor Hui of Jin China (approximate...


In 262, Jiang Wei, despite Liao Hua's opposition, again attacked Wei, targeting Taoyang (洮陽, in modern Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Hezuo), Gansu), but was defeated by Deng Ai. He withdrew to Tazhong (沓中, also in modern Gannan), and, apprehensive that Huang Hao might take this opportunity to damage him politically, did not dare to return to the Shu Han capital Chengdu, but remained at Tazhong, perhaps to carry out one strategy that Zhuge considered late in his campaigns -- have soldiers grow wheat to use as next year's food supply. Why Jiang was particularly apprehensive of Huang at this point was that he had unsuccessfully tried to persuade Liu Shan to execute Huang Hao earlier that year, and Huang was trying to find an opportunity to replace Jiang Wei with his friend Yan Yu (閻宇). // Events Births Deaths Xi Kang, author Other Often associated with the legendary Laurence 262, whos origins are unknown. ... Liao Hua (廖化; ? - 263 CE), courtesy name Yuanjian (元儉), a military and political figure in ancient Chinese history. ... Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Simplified Chinese: 甘南藏族自治州; Pinyin: Gānnán Zàngzú Zìzhìzhōu; Tibetan: -དཀར་ལྷོ་བོད་རིགས་རང་སྐྱོང་ཁུལ་ / Dkar-lho Bod-rigs rang-skyong-khul) is an autonomous prefecture in southern Gansu Province, China. ... Gansu (Simplified Chinese: 甘肃; Traditional Chinese: 甘肅; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kan-su, Kansu, or Kan-suh) is a province located in the northwest of the Peoples Republic of China. ... Not to be confused with Chengde. ...


Fall of Shu Han

In 258, Jiang Wei had suggested the following strategic plan be drawn up in case of a major Wei attack -- that the border cities do not try to resist, but instead have the main forces to withdraw to the mountain passes to wait for Wei forces to be worn out, and then close up their path of withdrawal. Liu Shan approved the strategy and made it the official plan to follow in case Cao Wei attacked. Events Sun Xiu succeeds Sun Liang as ruler of the Chinese kingdom of Wu The Goths ravage Asia Minor and Trabzon Gaul, Britain and Spain break off from the Roman Empire to form the Gallic Empire Nanjing University first founded in Nanjing, China Births Emperor Hui of Jin China (approximate...


Late in 262, aggravated by Jiang's constant attacks, Sima Zhao considered hiring assassins to kill Jiang Wei. At his strategists' suggestion, he decided instead to try to wipe out Shu Han once and for all, and commissioned Deng Ai and Zhong Hui to lead the Cao Wei forces against Shu Han. Jiang Wei quickly realized that Wei was about to attack and petitioned Liu Shan to send forces to block off the key passes, but Huang Hao, believing in fortunetellers, disagreed and persuaded Liu Shan to take no actions on Jiang Wei's petition.


In 263, while Jiang was still at Tazhong, the Wei attack was launched. Liu Shan ordered that Jiang Wei's plan from 258 AD be carried out -- but much to Liu Shan's surprise, the Wei forces took no heed of Shu Han border cities at all and headed directly for the key passes. Jiang Wei quickly withdrew his forces to try to defend against the attack, and after some initial failures, was finally able to block off Zhong Hui's forces at Jiange (劍閣, in modern Guangyuan, Sichuan). Zhong Hui considered retreating, but Deng Ai led a smaller detachment through a treacherous mountain pass descending on Jiangyou (江油, in modern Mianyang, Sichuan), defeating Zhuge Liang's son Zhuge Zhan and heading directly for the Shu Han capital Chengdu. Surprised and believing that Chengdu was defenseless, Liu Shan surrendered and ordered Jiang Wei to surrender to Zhong Hui, even though Chengdu was still manned by hundreds of thousands of soldiers. Zhong Hui treated Jiang Wei with respect and quickly made him a key advisor. Events The Wei Kingdom conquered the kingdom of Shu Han, one of the Chinese Three Kingdoms. ... Guangyuan (Simplified Chinese: 广元; Traditional Chinese: 廣元; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuang-yüan) is a prefecture-level city in the Sichuan Province with a population of three million. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: SzÅ­4-chuan1; Postal map spelling: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in the central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Mianyang (Chinese: 绵阳; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Mian-yang) is a prefecture-level city and the second largest city in Sichuan Province, in south central China, with a population of 5. ...   (Chinese: ; pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: SzÅ­4-chuan1; Postal map spelling: Szechwan and Szechuan) is a province in the central-western China with its capital at Chengdu. ... Zhuge Zhan (諸葛瞻) was the son of Huang Yueying and Zhuge Liang. ... Not to be confused with Chengde. ...


Efforts to reestablish Shu Han and death

Jiang Wei quickly saw that Zhong Hui had other ideas -- Zhong considered his abilities superior to all Wei generals, even Sima Zhao, and wanted to overthrow Sima. Jaing Wei encouraged Zhong to rebel against Sima Zhao, and Zhong agreed. Zhong Hui first falsely reported to Sima Zhao that Deng Ai was planning a rebellion, and forged letters to and from Deng to increase the tension between Sima Zhao and Deng Ai. In early 264, Sima ordered that Zhong arrest Deng and seize his troops -- but at the same time led a force personally, heading toward Chengdu from the Cao Wei capital Luoyang. Zhong Hui, after seizing Deng Ai's troops, realized that Sima Zhao had seen through his intentions, and declared a rebellion. Luoyang (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a prefecture-level city in western Henan province, Peoples Republic of China. ...


Jiang Wei had other plans, however. He tried to persuade Zhong Hui to kill all of the high level Cao Wei officers, with his own plan that after Zhong did so, he would kill Zhong Hui and then all of the Wei soldiers and redeclare Shu Han's independence. He wrote letters to Liu Shan explaining his actions. Zhong Hui tentatively agreed with Jiang Wei's suggestion to kill all of the key officers, but hesitated in carrying the plan out. The plan leaked, however, and Zhong's soldiers turned against him. Jiang Wei led Zhong's personal guards against the rebelling soldiers, but could not withstand the attack and was killed in battle, along with Zhong Hui. Jiang Wei's wife and children were also killed in the confusion.


Historical views of Jiang Wei

Jiang Wei was one of the most controversial figures in Chinese history. In Bo Yang's Modern Chinese Edition of Sima Guang's Zizhi Tongjian, for example, Bo cited seven different and discordant views of Jiang's career -- ranging from ringing endorsements of his honesty and loyalty to Shu Han (Pei Songzhi (裴松之), commentator to the Records of Three Kingdoms) to criticism of his constant draining campaigns (Chen Shou, author of the Sanguo Zhi) to outright condemnation (Sun Sheng (孫盛), author of the Spring and Autumn Annals of Jin), each of which could be considered a potentially valid view of his complicated character. (Bo himself declined comment, but later in an open letter to a reader suggested that all of the views were, indeed, correct -- that Jiang's fatal errors were to drain the energy of his people, but that he was indeed an honest and loyal man, willing to lay down his life in a futile attempt to reestablish Shu Han.) Bo Yang (柏楊, born 1920) is a Mainlander-born writer based in Taiwan. ... Sima Guang (Chinese:司马光; Wade-Giles:Szuma Kuang, 1019-1086) was a Chinese historian, scholar and statesman of the Song Dynasty. ... Zizhi Tongjian (traditional Chinese character: 資治通鑑; simplified Chinese character: 资治通鉴; pinyin Zīzhì Tōngjìan, Wade-Giles Tzu-chih tung-chien) is known to be a important Chinese history text of annual chronology. ... The Sānguó Zhì (Chinese 三国志, or 三國誌), variously translated as Chronicles of the Three Kingdoms, Records of the Three States and Records of the Three Kingdoms, was the official and authoritative historical text on the Three Kingdoms Period compiled by Chen Shou during the Jin Dynasty (265-420). ... Chen Shou (陳壽) (233-297), courtesy name Chengzuo (承祚) was the author of the Sanguo Zhi, a historical account of the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... The Jin Dynasty (晉 pinyin: jìn, 265-420), one of the Six Dynasties, followed the Three Kingdoms and preceded the Southern and Northern Dynasties in China. ...


Modern references

Jiang Wei, as he appears in Dynasty Warriors 5.
Jiang Wei, as he appears in Dynasty Warriors 5.

Jiang Wei is a playable character the Koei video game series Dynasty Warriors. He is portrayed as an inherently kind and noble individual with a fierce desire to learn and a deep respect for brilliant men, friend and foe alike. Jiang wields a trident called the "Blink" in battle and generally wears leather and cloth of a decidedly Westernised appearance. Although initially an officer of Wei and serving under Ma Zun, Jiang is soon convinced by his revered idol Zhuge Liang to join Shu Han, where his potential would be properly appreciated. Even if the player is successful in defeating Zhuge Liang while serving Cao Wei, Jiang will inevitabley flee to Shu Han when Ma Zun begins to fear Jiang's abilities. Here, Jiang becomes Zhuge's most promising and talented prodigy, with key battles involving Zhuge teaching Jiang how to lead an offensive, conduct a siege, etc. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (667x1000, 260 KB) Jiang Wei of Shu Han. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (667x1000, 260 KB) Jiang Wei of Shu Han. ... Dynasty Warriors 5 (真・三國無双4) is a beat em up video game set in China and the fifth installment in the Dynasty Warriors series, developed by Omega Force and published by Koei, the game was released on the PlayStation 2 and Xbox. ... Koeis Current Company Logo Koei Co. ... The Logo of Shin Sangokumusou 5 (Dynasty Warriors 6) Dynasty Warriors ( 真・三國無双:Shin Sangokumusou in Japan; literally meaning True - Unrivaled Three Kingdoms) is a series of video games created by Koei based loosely around the Romance of the Three Kingdoms epic, and is a spinoff series of another Koei game Romance... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... Ma Zun (馬遵) was the governor of Tian Shui during the Three Kingdoms period of China. ...


Jiang Wei's "Musou Mode" (story mode) culminates in the Battle of Wu Zhang Plains, wherein Zhuge Liang's escalating illness forces Jiang Wei to assume control of the Shu army whilst pitted against Wei's most brilliant and deadly strategist, Sima Yi, after Zhuge finally succumbs to sickness. Jiang successfully rallies the panic-stricken, retreating Shu Han army and turns the tide against Sima as he prematurely celebrates his "victorious" campaign. (This depiction is historically inaccurate, as these actions were carried out by Yang Yi, not Jiang.) After uniting China under the Shu Han banner, Jiang Wei is shown assuming the position of chief strategist to Liu Shan (alternately named Liu Chan in the game), retiring his trident in favour of Zhuge Liang's "White Feather." Jiang Wei's first Dynasty Warriors appearance is in Dynasty Warriors 2. Combatants Cao Wei Shu Han Commanders Sima Yi Zhuge Liang† Yang Yi, Fei Yi Strength 200,000 100,000 The Battle of Wuzhang Plains (五丈原之戰) is a famous standoff between the kingdoms of Wei and Shu in 234 A.D. during the Three Kingdoms period of China. ... Sima Yi (179 - 251) was a general, military strategist, and politician of Cao Wei during the Three Kingdoms period. ... This article or section may be confusing for some readers, and should be edited to be clearer or more simplified. ... The Logo of Shin Sangokumusou 5 (Dynasty Warriors 6) Dynasty Warriors ( 真・三國無双:Shin Sangokumusou in Japan; literally meaning True - Unrivaled Three Kingdoms) is a series of video games created by Koei based loosely around the Romance of the Three Kingdoms epic, and is a spinoff series of another Koei game Romance... Dynasty Warriors 2 (真・三國無双) is the second game in Koeis Dynasty Warriors series, available on Playstation 2. ...

 Because of high amounts of Character redesigns and early release for Christmas, Jiang Wei does not appear in Dynasty Warriors 6 as a playable character 

In Koei's Romance of the Three Kingdoms strategy game series, Jiang Wei is known as "Zhuge Liang's Scholarly Heir". Romance of the Three Kingdoms for the Nintendo Entertainment System Romance of the Three Kingdoms is a computer and video game that originated from Japan. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Jiang Wei - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (439 words)
Jiang Wei (姜維, 202-264), or Jiang Boyue, was amongst some of the greatest generals during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history.
Jiang was ultimately unsuccessful in his attempts to conquer or establish a firm foothold in the Kingdom of Wei, and as a result of all of these efforts, Jiang Wei depleted the strength of Shu.
Jiang proposed to restore the kingdom by persuading Zhong to rebel, but his plot was discovered and Jiang killed himself out of guilt for he had 'given away' the Shu Kingdom and lost to Wei.
Jiang Wei - definition of Jiang Wei in Encyclopedia (284 words)
Jiang Wei 姜維 (204-263) was a general during the Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history.
However, he was ultimately unsucessful in his attempts to conquer or establish a foothold in the Kingdom of Wei, and as a result of all of these efforts, Jiang Wei depleted the strength of Shu.
Jiang proposed to restore the kingdom by persuading the Wei general Zhong Hui to rebel, but his plot was discovered and Jiang himself was killed along with the general by the Wei Army next year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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